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Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
Art Appreciation-Chapter2
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Art Appreciation-Chapter2

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  • which answer is false?? the artist of this work

    a. Created a dramatic, dynamic composition

    b. Was interested in the many lines found in the composition

    c. Was attentive to his surroundings

    d. Encourages his audience to take note of the everyday and overlooked.
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  • Transcript

    • 1. VISUAL COMMUNICATION CHAPTER 2
    • 2. LOOKING AND SEEINGLOOKING-TAKING IN WHAT IS BEFORE USSEEING-ACTIVE EXTENSION OF LOOKING ORDINARY THINGS BECOME EXTRAORDINARY WHEN WE SEE THEM DEEPLY
    • 3. EDWARD WESTON PEPPER #30
    • 4. THE VISUAL TOOLBOXVISUAL TOOLS USED BY ARTISTS TO CREATE ARTISTICEXPRESSION LINE, SHAPE, MASS, SPACE, TIME, MOTION, LIGHT, COLOR, ABSTRACTION
    • 5. CHARACTERISTICS OF LINELINES CAN BE ACTIVE OR STATIC, AGGRESSIVE ORPASSIVE, SENSUAL OR MECHANICALLINES CAN: INDICATE DIRECTION DEFINE SHAPES AND BOUNDARIES IMPLY VOLUME OR MASS DEPICT LIGHT AND SHADOW FORM PATTERNS
    • 6. LEE FRIEDLANDERBISMARCK, NORTH DAKOTA 2002
    • 7. LINE VARIATIONS ACTUAL LINE
    • 8. LINE VARIATIONS IMPLIED LINE
    • 9. LINE VARIATIONSACTUAL STRAIGHT LINES AND IMPLIED CURVE LINE
    • 10. LINE VARIATIONS LINE CREATED BY EDGE
    • 11. LINE VARIATIONSVERTICAL LINE, HORIZONTAL LINE
    • 12. LINE VARIATIONS DIAGONAL LINES
    • 13. LINE VARIATIONS SHARP, JAGGED LINE
    • 14. LINE VARIATIONSDANCE OF CURVING LINES
    • 15. LINE VARIATIONS HARD LINE, SOFT LINE
    • 16. LINE VARIATIONSRAGGED, IRREGULAR LINE
    • 17. ALNSELM REYLE UNTITLED 2006
    • 18. BRIDGET RILEY CURRENT 1964
    • 19. TORII KIYOTADA
    • 20. KORII KIYOTADA
    • 21. KIKI SMITH GINGER 2000
    • 22. IMPLIED LINEIMPLIED LINES-SUGGEST VISUAL CONNECTIONS CAN SERVE AS AN UNDERLYING STRUCTURE
    • 23. SHAPESHAPE-EXPANSE WITHIN THE OUTLINE OF A TWO-DIMENSIONAL AREA OR WITHIN THE BOUNDARIES OF ATHREE-DIMENSIONAL OBJECTTWO CATEGORIES GEOMETRIC SHAPES-CIRCLES, TRIANGLES... ORGANIC SHAPES-IRREGULAR SHAPESSHAPES ON A PICTURE PLANE CAN ALSO CREATE ASECONDARY SHAPE IN THE NEGATIVE SPACE
    • 24. IMPLIED SHAPE
    • 25. M.C. ESCHERSKY AND WATER 1 1938
    • 26. MASSA 2-DIMENSIONAL AREA IS A SHAPE, BUT A 3-DIMENSIONAL AREA IS A MASSWHEN A MASS ENCLOSES SPACE IT IS VOLUMEMOST OFTEN USED IN SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE
    • 27. SENNEFERSTEWARD OF THE PALACE 1450
    • 28. ELIZABETH CATLETT BREAD 1962
    • 29. SPACESPACE IS THE INDEFINABLE EMPTYHOW AN ARTIST ORGANIZES THE SPACE IS A VERYIMPORTANT STEP IN THE MAKING OF THEIR ART3D SPACE IS EXPERIENCED BY THE VIEWER2D SPACE IS SIMPLY THE PARAMETERS OF THE ART, BUTSPACE CAN BE IMPLIED
    • 30. CESAR PELLI AND ASSOCIATESNORTH TERMINAL, RONALD REAGAN WASHINGTON NATIONAL AIRPORT
    • 31. TOMB OF NEBAMUN POOL IN THE GARDEN
    • 32. IMPLIED DEPTHWHEN SHAPES OVERLAP, WE ASSUME THAT ONE IS INFRONT OF THE OTHERDIMINISHING SIZE-AS THINGS GET FURTHER AWAY,THEY APPEAR SMALLERVERTICAL PLACEMENT-THINGS LOWER ON THE PICTUREPLANE APPEAR CLOSER
    • 33. CLUES TO SPATIAL DEPTH
    • 34. MU QISIX PERSIMMONS 1269
    • 35. LINEAR PERSPECTIVEPERSPECTIVE REFERS TO POINT OF VIEWIN ART, PERSPECTIVE REFERS TO THE REPRESENTATIONOF 3D OBJECTS IN SPACE
    • 36. LINEAR PERSPECTIVE
    • 37. RAPHAELTHE SCHOOL OF ATHENS 1508
    • 38. ATMOSPHERIC PERSPECTIVEATMOSPHERIC OR AERIAL PERSPECTIVE-DEPTH ISCREATED BY DIFFERENCE IN COLOR, VALUE, AND DETAILAS THINGS GET FURTHER AWAY, THEY APPEAR MOREINDISTINCT AND CONTAIN LESS CONTRAST BETWEENLIGHT AND DARK
    • 39. ASHER BROWEN DURAND KINDRED SPIRIT 1849
    • 40. SHEN ZHOUPOET ON A MOUNTAIN TOP 1427-1509
    • 41. TIME AND MOTIONTIME-FOURTH DIMENSION IN WHICH EVENTS OCCUR INSUCCESSION
    • 42. AZTEC CALENDAR 1479 STONE
    • 43. SASSETTA AND WORKSHOPTHE MEETING OF ST. ANTHONY AND ST. PAUL
    • 44. GARY PANTER BACK TO NATURE 2001
    • 45. MOTIONARTISTS OFTEN TRY TO FIND WAYS TO DEPICT MOTIONMOTION CAN GIVE A LIFE LIKE QUALITY TO A WORKTWO CATEGORIES: IMPLIED MOTION ACTUAL MOTION
    • 46. DANCING KRISHNA
    • 47. JENNY HOLZER UNTITLED 1989
    • 48. LIGHTLIGHT CAN DRASTICALLY CHANGE HOW WE SEE A PIECEOF ART, SPECIFICALLY SCULPTUREVALUE REFERS THE DARKNESS OF LIGHTNESS OF ASURFACE
    • 49. DANIEL CHESTER ABRAHAM LINCOLN 1850-1931
    • 50. ANNIBALE CARRACCI HEAD OF YOUTH 1560-1609
    • 51. COLORCOLOR CAN AFFECT OUR THOUGHTS, MOODS, ACTIONS,AND EVEN HEALTHMOST CULTURES USE COLOR SYMBOLICALLYCOLOR IS THE EFFECT OF LIGHT ON OUR EYES WHITE LIGHT CONTAINS ALL COLORS COMBINED TO SEE A COLOR IS TO SEE PART OF WHITE LIGHT
    • 52. PIGMENTS AND LIGHTWHEN LIGHT REFLECT OFF OF A SURFACE, SOME LIGHTIS ABSORBED AND SOME LIGHT IS REFLECTED. THEREFLECTED LIGHT MAKES THE COLORWHEN ALL LIGHT IS ABSORBED IN THE SURFACE, ITAPPEARS BLACK
    • 53. COMPONENTS OF COLORHUE- THE SPECTRAL COLOR (RED, GREEN, YELLOW...)VALUE-LIGHTNESS OR DARKNESS OF THE COLOR ADD BLACK TO CREATE A SHADE OF A COLOR ADD WHITE TO CREATE A TINT OF A COLORINTENSITY/SATURATION-PURITY OF THE HUE
    • 54. HUE
    • 55. VALUE
    • 56. VALUE
    • 57. INTENSITY
    • 58. PIGMENT PRIMARIESSUBTRACTIVE COLOR MIXTURE
    • 59. LIGHT PRIMARIESADDITIVE COLOR MIXTURE
    • 60. COLOR WHEELPRIMARIES-RED, YELLOW, BLUESECONDARY-MIXTURE OF TWO PRIMARIES ORANGE, GREEN, VIOLETINTERMEDIATE-BETWEEN PRIMARIES AND SECONDARIES RED-ORANGE, YELLOW-ORANGE, YELLOW-GREEN, BLUE-GREEN, BLUE-VIOLET, RED-VIOLET
    • 61. WARM/COOL COLORS
    • 62. JAMES ABBOTT MCNEILL WHISTLERMONOCHROMATICCOLOR SCHEME USESVARIATIONS OF THESAME HUETHE ARTIST MAY FEELTHIS COLORREPRESENTS A MOOD
    • 63. JENNIFER BARTLETTANALOGOUS COLORSCHEMES ARE BASEDON COLOR NEAR EACHOTHER ON THE COLORWHEEL
    • 64. KEITH HARINGCOMPLEMENTARYCOLOR SCHEMES USEHUES ON OPPOSITESIDES OF THE COLORWHEELINTENSIFIES CONTRAST
    • 65. ART AND REALITYHOW AN ARTIST APPROACHED REALITY IS PART OFTHEIR VISUAL TOOLBOXHOW REALITY IS DEPICTED: REPRESENTATIONAL ABSTRACT NONREPRESENTATIONAL
    • 66. REPRESENTATIONAL ARTDEPICTS THEAPPEARANCE OFTHINGSREPRESENTATIONALART DEPICTSSUBJECTS
    • 67. ABSTRACT ARTABSTRACT IS TO TAKETHE ESSENCE OF ANOBJECT OR IDEAABSTRACT ART CAN: HAVE NO REFERENCE TO REAL OBJECTS SIMPLIFY OR EXAGGERATE OBJECTS
    • 68. NON REPRESENTATIONALVISUAL FORMS WITHNO REFERENCES TOANYTHING REAL
    • 69. FORM AND CONTENTFORM-WHAT WE SEECONTENT-THE MEANING WE GET FROM WHAT WE SEE
    • 70. ICONOGRAPHYSYMBOLIC MEANING OFSIGNS, SUBJECTS, ANDIMAGES

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