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OTAPE

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How can you create presentations that will stick with learners and create lasting change? Use the OTAPE method, and you can help people become Batman. …

How can you create presentations that will stick with learners and create lasting change? Use the OTAPE method, and you can help people become Batman.

I'm totally serious. Batman.

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  • 1. Be the Bat Using the OTAPE Method to Train Effectively Dan Larsen
  • 2. This is the current Justice League.
  • 3. I’m pretty unique compared to the rest of the group.
  • 4. He’s an Alantean (as in, Atlantis) with super-strength who can breath under water.
  • 5. He has a ring that allows him to create whatever he can imagine. Oh, and fly through outer space.
  • 6. She’s an Amazonian with super-strength who can deflect bullets and fly.
  • 7. He’s an alien that gets pretty much every super power there is from our sun’s radiation.
  • 8. He can run really fast. Or something.
  • 9. And he has super-advanced cybernetic enhancements. When he wants to, he can turn his arm into a laser gun. A laser gun.
  • 10. In comparison, I’m “normal” – and I catch flack for this on occasion, mostly from the green one.
  • 11. But here’s the thing – I’m just as awesome as the rest of the Justice League, and I did it without a power ring or a yellow sun.
  • 12. I know what you’re thinking.
  • 13. That’s comic books. The real world doesn’t work that way.
  • 14. Superhuman Talent What Does it Take to be Great? Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Well, let’s talk about this guy. He actually has a lot in common with me.
  • 15. Superhuman Talent What Does it Take to be Great? Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Plus, comics are for geeks, AMIRITE? Golf is so much more refined.
  • 16. Superhuman Talent What Does it Take to be Great? Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Here’s what Tiger’s accomplished so far.
  • 17.  Won 78 official PGA tour events (including 14 majors)  One of only five players to have achieved the Career Grand Slam by winning all four major championships – The only one to win them in a row – The youngest to win all four (25-years-old) Superhuman Talent What Does it Take to be Great? Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate
  • 18.  Won 78 official PGA tour events (including 14 majors)  One of only five players to have achieved the Career Grand Slam by winning all four major championships – The only one to win them in a row – The youngest to win all four (25-years-old) Superhuman Talent What Does it Take to be Great? Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Are you seeing this?
  • 19.  Won 78 official PGA tour events (including 14 majors)  One of only five players to have achieved the Career Grand Slam by winning all four major championships – The only one to win them in a row – The youngest to win all four (25-years-old) Superhuman Talent What Does it Take to be Great? Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate He must be born to golf, right? Have some innate talent for being an incredible player?
  • 20.  Won 78 official PGA tour events (including 14 majors)  One of only five players to have achieved the Career Grand Slam by winning all four major championships – The only one to win them in a row – The youngest to win all four (25-years-old) Superhuman Talent What Does it Take to be Great? Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Nope.
  • 21. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate
  • 22. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate This is Tiger at three-years-old.
  • 23. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate He became great just like I did – with a massive amount of dedicated practice over the course of decades.
  • 24. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate That’s where OTAPE comes in. Let me explain.
  • 25. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate OTAPE is not meant to make people great, like Tiger or myself.
  • 26. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate This is Noel Tichy, a management consultant and business professor.
  • 27. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate He said this:
  • 28. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate “Some people are much more motivated than others, and that's the existential question I cannot answer – why.”
  • 29. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate In my case, my parents were murdered viciously in front of me…. Hopefully, I’m the exception. “Some people are much more motivated than others, and that's the existential question I cannot answer – why.”
  • 30. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate But OTAPE is still important, because it is meant… “Some people are much more motivated than others, and that's the existential question I cannot answer – why.”
  • 31. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate To put greatness within reach “Some people are much more motivated than others, and that's the existential question I cannot answer – why.”
  • 32. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate You’re leading them to water, in the words of the famous proverb, and preparing them to be successful whenever they decide to drink. “Some people are much more motivated than others, and that's the existential question I cannot answer – why.” To put greatness within reach
  • 33. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE “Some people are much more motivated than others, and that's the existential question I cannot answer – why.” Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate In non-proverbial language, you do this – put greatness within reach – by teaching others how to practice the way Tiger and I practiced to become great. To put greatness within reach
  • 34. Not to make them great The Purpose of OTAPE “Some people are much more motivated than others, and that's the existential question I cannot answer – why.” Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate That’s what OTAPE does. To put greatness within reach
  • 35. The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate If you hadn’t guessed, it’s called OTAPE for a reason.
  • 36. 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply 4. Practice and Evaluate The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate O.T.A.P.E.
  • 37. 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply 4. Practice and Evaluate The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Follow these steps while you present.
  • 38. 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply 4. Practice and Evaluate The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Those of you who are astute may notice some similarities between OTAPE and the running agenda below.
  • 39. 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply 4. Practice and Evaluate The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate “Ohhhhhhhhh….”
  • 40. 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply 4. Practice and Evaluate The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate We’ll come back to that later.
  • 41. 1. Overview The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Let’s start with an overview
  • 42. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate As you can see, the overview is the why behind the what.
  • 43. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate It’s your opportunity, as the presenter, to sell your audience on the idea. If you’re good, you’ll also do it in a way that’s memorable.
  • 44. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate There’s a tricky balance at play, though. Balance
  • 45. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate How can you be memorable, but not too distracting? Balance
  • 46. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information Take this training, for example.
  • 47. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information I picked Batman and golf as the mechanisms to make this training “stick”.
  • 48. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information Is that too goofy? Maybe for some. Like I said, it’s a balance.
  • 49. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information You can be as ‘professional’ as you want…
  • 50. O.T.A.P.E. Trainings Presenter Date
  • 51. • The OTAPE method will help people practice unfamiliar skills and improve their performance • There is a proverb that says, “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink.” With OTAPE, you are leading them to water, telling them how drinking will help them, showing them how to drink. Ultimately, they need to work at it themselves, but if you’ve trained them right, they’ll have the tools they need to be successful. • The “O” stands for “Overview” • Tell participants why you are training them on a specific skill. Make the overview memorable. • The “T” stands for “Train” • Choose three to five basic steps that participants can learn and practice. You will practice together.
  • 52. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information But you should ask yourself what your objective is –
  • 53. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information Are you setting out to present your material in the most ‘professional’ way possible?
  • 54. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information Or are you trying to create lasting , meaningful change?
  • 55. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information The two are not mutually exclusive, but priority is important.
  • 56. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information Luckily, I have a principle to guide you.
  • 57. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information Pro-tip:
  • 58. Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information 2X2 matrixes make you look like a genius.
  • 59. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information BAM! Told you.
  • 60. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information Think about it in terms of food.
  • 61. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information You’re feeding your audience an idea.
  • 62. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information The tastiest marshmallow won’t change their lives…
  • 63. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information …and they won’t even try the broccoli.
  • 64. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information With Batman and golf, I’ve tried to end up here.
  • 65. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information Hopefully I’ve been successful.
  • 66. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information You won’t win with everyone…
  • 67. Nutrition (Information Usefulness) Taste(MessageEntertainment) Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate A Good Overview Finding a Balance Between Entertainment and Information …but if you’re smart, you’ll win with most.
  • 68. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Next is to train. Balance
  • 69. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate If an overview is the why, the training is the how. Balance
  • 70. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Keep the steps brief, or they will be too hard to practice. Balance
  • 71. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate OTAPE has four steps, for example. Balance
  • 72. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate After you train on the steps, you have an opportunity to give a good demonstration of what the skill looks like in action. Balance
  • 73. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Since you’re going to make participants role-play, it’s only fair to show them how. Balance
  • 74. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Finally, practice and evaluate the skill together. Balance
  • 75. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Evaluation should be relatively simple, since it’s based on the steps you just covered. Balance
  • 76. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate This is probably the most important thing you’ll do. Balance
  • 77. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Remember, we’re trying to create lasting change. Balance Lasting Change
  • 78. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate That change won’t happen during your training, rock star. Balance Lasting Change
  • 79. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate They’ll have to drink on their own. Balance Lasting Change
  • 80. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Over and over and over and over…. Balance Lasting Change
  • 81. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Drinking with them will give them a good start, because practice is hard. Balance Lasting Change
  • 82. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate At least, the kind of practice they’ll need to be doing is hard. Balance Lasting Change
  • 83. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Let me explain. Balance Lasting Change
  • 84. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate Back to golf.
  • 85. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate This is Geoffrey Colvin, the man behind the idea of “deliberate practice”.
  • 86. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate He said this:
  • 87. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better.
  • 88. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. I know what you’re thinking.
  • 89. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. “Well, no duh Geoffrey Colvin. You’ve gotta hit a bunch of buckets. Psh, can you believe this guy?”
  • 90. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. Not quite.
  • 91. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. Therein lies what makes deliberate practice so difficult.
  • 92. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. There’s 20 years of experience, and then there’s one year of experience 20 times.
  • 93. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. The two are very different.
  • 94. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. In the same way, there’s practice, and then there’s deliberate practice. Colvin continues:
  • 95. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. “Hitting an eight-iron 300 times with a goal of leaving the ball within 20 feet of the pin 80% of time time, continually observing results and making appropriate adjustments, and doing that for hours every day – that’s deliberate practice.”
  • 96. Good Practice and Evaluation Helping Participants Practice How to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate “Simply hitting a bucket of balls is not deliberate practice, which is why most golfers don’t get better. “Hitting an eight-iron 300 times with a goal of leaving the ball within 20 feet of the pin 80% of time time, continually observing results and making appropriate adjustments, and doing that for hours every day – that’s deliberate practice.” See the difference?
  • 97. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Without doing really well on steps 2 through 4, participants are at a tremendous disadvantage when they start to practice. Balance Lasting Change
  • 98. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate They likely won’t even be able to achieve deliberate practice. Balance Lasting Change
  • 99. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate And without doing really well on step 1, no one will care enough to practice. Balance Lasting Change
  • 100. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Especially the kind of practice that is difficult and painful, but essential to lasting change. Balance Lasting Change
  • 101. 1. Overview – The why behind the what – Creates buy-in – Makes your training “sticky” 2. Train – The how behind the what – Three to five simple steps that participants can practice 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) – Give a good demonstration of the skill – This step prepares participants to practice themselves 4. Practice and Evaluate – Participants role-play the skill; the group then evaluates – Use the steps outlined in training to help evaluation – Participants are practicing how to practice the skill The OTAPE Method Step-by-Step Overview Train Apply Practice/Evaluate Do you see how it all fits together? Balance Lasting Change
  • 102. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate Now, I would be remiss in my duty if I did not give a good demonstration of the OTAPE skill.
  • 103. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate Frankly, it would be Morissette-level ironic.
  • 104. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate So let’s look for OTAPE in this OTAPE training!
  • 105. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate Did you see the overview? 1. Overview
  • 106. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview
  • 107. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate And what about training? 1. Overview 2. Train
  • 108. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview 2. Train
  • 109. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate And the demonstration? 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate)
  • 110. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate)
  • 111. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate And step 4 would come after we’re done demonstrating. 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate
  • 112. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate This OTAPE training is a fantastic example of OTAPE. 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate
  • 113. The OTAPE Method Demonstration Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate I take it back. That’s Morissette-level ironic. 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate
  • 114. The OTAPE Method Time to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate Now, I can’t really practice with you.
  • 115. The OTAPE Method Time to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate You get what you pay for and all that.
  • 116. The OTAPE Method Time to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate But you’re a champ. Give it a try.
  • 117. The OTAPE Method Time to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate With time, this will be second nature.
  • 118. The OTAPE Method Time to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate You’ll help people experience meaningful, lasting change.
  • 119. The OTAPE Method Time to Practice Overview Train Demonstrate Practice/Evaluate 1. Overview 2. Train 3. Apply (or Demonstrate) 4. Practice and Evaluate You’ll be the bat.
  • 120. And the bat rocks.

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