History Chapter 14 Study Guide

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History Chapter 14 Study Guide
American Journey

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  • History Chapter 14 Study Guide

    1. 1. HISTORY CHAPTER 14 TEST STUDY GUIDE By Ally Naifeh
    2. 2. SECTION 1VocabularySection ReviewReading CheckTimeline
    3. 3. VOCABULARYUtopia- community based on a vision of a perfect society sought byreformersRevival- a series of meetings conducted by a preacher to arousereligious emotionsTemperance- the use of little or no alcoholic drinknormal school- a two-year school for training high school graduatesas teachersTranscendentalist- any of a group of New England writers whostressed the relationship between human beings and nature,spiritual things over material things, and the importance of theindividual conscience
    4. 4. SECTION REVIEW 2-32. What were the three accepted principles of public education inthe 1850s? Pg. 413By the 1850s most states had accepted three basic principles ofpublic education: that schools should be free and supported bytaxes, that teachers should be trained, and that children should berequired to attend school.3. How did Thoreau act on his beliefs? What impact might suchacts have had on the government? Pg. 415He refused to pay one-dollar tax to vote and chose to go to jail.Thoreau put his beliefs into practice through civil disobediencerefusing to obey laws he thought were unjust.
    5. 5. SECTION REVIEW 4-5 4. What did Thomas Jefferson mean when he said that the United States could not survive as a democracy without educated and well-informed citizens? Pg. 3 “... (W)ell directed education improves the morals, enlarges the minds, enlightens the councils, instructs the industry, and advances the power, the prosperity, and the happiness ...” 5. Re-create the diagram below and describe two ways the religious movement influenced reform. Pg. 413 The first Great Awakening had spread through the colonies in the mid-1700s. The new religious movement began with frontier camp meetings called revivals.Religious People came from miles around to hear eloquent preachers, such as Charles Finney, and to pray, sing, weep, and shout. The experience often made men and women eager to reform both their own lives and the world. The Second Great Awakening increased church membership. It alsoMovement inspired people to become involved in missionary work and social reform movements.
    6. 6. SECTION REVIEWStudy the paintingof the school roomon page 414. Whatis pictured that youstill use in schooltoday? Pg. 414Alphabet
    7. 7. READING CHECKWhat were the effects of the second great awakening?Church membership increased and people were more eager toreform both their own lives and the world.How did Dr. Samuel Howe help the visually impaired?He developed books with large raised letters that people withsight impairments could “read “ with their fingers. Howe headedthe Perkins Institute, a school for the blind, in Boston.What was one of the subjects that margaret fuller wrote about?Through her writings, Fuller supported rights for women.
    8. 8. TIMELINE• 1820 • 1830 • 1840 • 1850 1825 1835 1837 1843 Robert Owen Oberlin College Horace Mann initiates Dorothea Dix reveals establishes New admits African education reform abuses of mentally ill Harmony, Indiana Americans
    9. 9. SECTION 2VocabularySection ReviewReading CheckTimeline
    10. 10. VOCABULARYAbolitionist- a person who strongly favors doing awaywith slaveryUnderground Railroad- a system that helped enslavedAfrican Americans follow a network of escape routesout of the South to freedom in the North
    11. 11. SECTION REVIEW 2-32. Describe the American Colonization Society’s solution toslavery. Pg. 219The American Colonization Society, formed in 1816 by a groupof white Virginians, worked to free enslaved workers gradually bybuying them from slaveholders and sending them abroad to startnew lives.3. What role did Harriet Tubman play in the antislaverymovement? Pg. 423After her escape from slavery, Harriet Tubman became the mostfamous conductor on the Underground Railroad. Slaveholdersoffered a large reward for Tubman’s capture or death.
    12. 12. SECTION REVIEW 4-54. Compare the arguments of Northerners with Southerners who opposedabolitionism. Pg. 423Southern slaveholders—and many Southerners who did not have slaves—opposedabolitionism because they believed it threatened the South’s way of life, whichdepended on enslaved labor. Many people in the North also opposed theabolitionist movement.5. Use a diagram like the one below to identify actions that abolitionists took tofree enslaved people. Pg. Freeing of Enslaved PeopleGarrison attracted enough followers to start the New England Antislavery Society in 1832 and the American Antislavery Society the next year In 1830 free African American leaders held their first convention in Philadelphia.As a runaway, Douglass could have been captured and returned to slavery. Still, he joined the Massachusetts Antislavery Society and traveled widely to address abolitionist meetings. Born a free man in North Carolina, writer David Walker of Boston published an impas- sioned argument against slavery.
    13. 13. SECTION REVIEW 66. Study the map on page423. Why do you thinkmore enslaved peopleescaped from the borderstates than from the DeepSouth? Pg. 423Because the faster theycrossed the border waswhen they could stoppedbeing scared ofsomebody capturingthem.
    14. 14. READING CHECKWhy did Frederick Douglass return to the United States?Douglass returned to the United States because hebelieved abolitionists must fight slavery at its source.How did the American Colonization Society FightSlavery?The American Colonization Society, formed in 1816 by agroup of white Virginians, worked to free enslavedworkers gradually by buying them from slaveholders andsending them abroad to start new lives.
    15. 15. TIMELINE• 1815 • 1830 • 1845 • 1860 1816 1822 1831 1847 American First African William Lloyd Liberia becomes Colonization Americans Garrison The an independent Society is formed settle in Liberia Liberator country
    16. 16. SECTION 3VocabularySection ReviewReading CheckTimeline
    17. 17. VOCABULARYSuffrage- the right to voteCoeducation- the teaching of male and femalestudents together
    18. 18. SECTION REVIEW 2-3How did the fight to end slavery help spark the women’s movement?Pg. Women sympathized with slaves because they too wereoppressed and disenfranchised by men. Women played a huge part inabolition for that reason and in the hopes that, were African Americanmales to obtain the basic rights of humanity, women might as well.Discuss three specific goals of the women’s rights movement. Pg. 425& 426 Mott gave lectures in Philadelphia calling for temperance,peace, workers’ rights, and abolition. The women’s declaration calledfor an end to all laws that discriminated against women. It demandedthat women be allowed to enter the all-male world of trades,professions, and businesses. The most controversial issue at the SenecaFalls Convention concerned suffrage, or the right to vote
    19. 19. SECTION REVIEW 4-5What qualities do you think women such as Sojourner Truth,Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and ElizabethBlackwell shared? Pg. These women shared the view of worldequality and not just in the United States. These people weresignificant in propelling America into what it is today.Re-create the diagram below and list the areas where womengained rights. Pg. Womens Rights The convention voted to include the demand for woman suffrage in the United States, this happened in Seneca Falls, New York. Beginning with Wyoming in 1890, several states granted women the right to vote.New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Wisconsin, Mississippi, and the new state of California recognized the right of women to own property after their marriage.
    20. 20. SECTION REVIEW 6Study the information on the feature on the Seneca FallsConvention on pages 426–427. When did Wyomingwomen gain the right to vote? What “first” did ElizabethBlackwell accomplish? Pg. 427In 1869 Women granted voting rights in WyomingTerritory. Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman toreceive a medical degree in the United States.
    21. 21. READING CHECKWhat is suffrage?Suffrage is the right to vote.Who established the Troy Female Seminary?Emma Willard
    22. 22. TIMELINE • 1830 • 1860 • 1890 18691837 1848 1857 Wyoming TerritoryMary Lyon First women’s Elizabeth Blackwell grants women theestablishes Mount rights convention founds the New York right to voteHolyoke Female held in Seneca Infirmary for Women andSeminary Falls, New York Children
    23. 23. CHAPTER ASSESSMENTChapter QuestionsChapter SummaryImportant Women of the Seneca Falls convention
    24. 24. QUESTIONS 12-14What were the founders of utopias hoping to achieve? Pg. 412 Some reformers sought to improve society by forming utopias.What problems in society did reformers in the temperance movement blame onthe manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages? Pg. 413 Reformers blamed alcohol for poverty, the breakup of families, crime, and even insanity.What were the basic principles of public education? Pg. 413 By the 1850s most states had accepted three basic principles of public education: that schools should be free and supported by taxes, that teachers should be trained, and that children should be required to attend school.
    25. 25. QUESTIONS 15-18What was unique about the subject matter that American artists and writers of the mid-1800s used? Pg. Earlier generations of American painters and writers lookes to Europe for their inspiration and models. Beginning in the 1820s American artists developed their own style and explored American themes.How did William Lloyd Garrison’s demands make him effective in the anti-slavery movement? Pg. 420 He called for imitated and complete emancipation.What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad? Pg. 422 African Americans on the Underground Railroad hoped to settle in a free state in the North or to move on to Canada.What role did Catherine Beecher play in education for women? Pg. 427 Early pioneers such as Catherine Beecher and Emma Hart Willard believed that women should be educated for their traditional roles in life.
    26. 26. QUESTION 19-20What role did Dorothea Dix play regarding prison inmates and people withmental illness? Pg. 414 & 415 When schoolteacher Dorothea Dix began visiting prisons in 1841, she found the prisoners were often living in inhumane conditions—chained to the walls with little or no clothing, often in unheated cells. To her further horror, she learned that some of the inmates were guilty of no crime—they were mentally ill persons. Dix made it her life’s work to educate the public as to the poor conditions for both the mentally ill and for prisoners.What was the significance of the Seneca Falls Convention? Pg. 426 The Seneca Falls Convention led to the growth of the woman suffrage movement.
    27. 27. CHAPTER SUMMARY A movement grows to improve education, make school attendanceUtopian communities compulsory, and help students with special needs. Groups start small voluntary communities to put their idealistic Abolition ideas into practice. Reformers work to help enslavedReligion people escape to freedom and to ban slavery. Great revival meetings, the building of new churches, and the founding of Women’s rights scores of colleges and universities mark the Second Great Awakening. Reformers call for equal rights, including the right to vote.Temperance The Arts Reformers work to control consumption of alcohol. Education •Writers and painters turn their attention to the American scene.
    28. 28. SENECA FALLS CONVENTION- WOMENElizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to receive a medical degree in the UnitedStates.Maria Mitchell gained world renown when she discovered a comet in 1847. Shebecame a professor of astronomy and the first woman elected to the American Academyof Arts and Sciences.Mary Ann Shadd Cary was the first African American woman in the nation to earn alaw degree.Helen Keller overcame the challenges of an illness that left her deaf, blind, and mute tohelp others with similar disabilities.Susette La Flesche was a member of the Omaha tribe and campaigned for NativeAmerican rights.Lucretia Mott and Susan B. Anthony were leaders in the effort to allow women agreater role in American society.

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