Studying the Book Arts in the 21st Century:
Using Linked Data to Enhance Knowledge and Context
(a case study)
Allison Jai ...
Linked Data
“The term Linked Data refers to a set of best practices for
publishing and interlinking structured data on the...
FollowYourNose
“In the context of determining the meaning of a
discovered URI, ‘Follow Your Nose’ is an informal
way to sa...
Resource Description Framework (RDF)
Subject: Allison
Predicate: lives in
Object: Miami
World Wide Web Consortium, “Resour...
User Task: Just Browse
“We contend that the current
state of the discussion around
browsing in libraries requires a
comple...
BIBFRAME: Linked Open Data FTW
Image from Coyle’s InFormation:
http://kcoyle.blogspot.com/2013/05/bibframe-authorities.htm...
Creator Metadata
• “The Creator element identifies the individual, group of
individuals, corporate body, cultural group, o...
Provenance
• “To better understand the meaning, function, and importance” of artifacts.
Lauren Lessing, “Problems in Prove...
Reconsidering Library Catalog Data
“Most standards development work … has focused on the
description of records or resourc...
Data Elements for Provenance
MARC Bibliographic record:
Entity identification information:
o Main Entry fields (1xx)
o Add...
The RAMP Editor
• Converts data to the EAC-CPF format
• Converts EAC-CPF records to wiki markup for export to Wikipedia
• ...
EAC-CPF
MOAR EAC PROJECTS!
• Harvard Library Lab, “Connecting the Dots: Using EAC-CPF to Reunite Samuel Johnson and His Ci...
XLink & Triples
<cpfRelation cpfRelationType="associative"
xlink:href="http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80106853"
xlin...
Book Artists Unbound
Links to:
• Web portfolios
• Biographies
• Maps
• Data visualizations
• Library catalog
• Wikipedia
•...
Book Artists Unbound
eac.allisonjai.com
More about the Book Artists Unbound project:
http://eac.allisonjai.com
Allison Jai O’Dell
University of Miami Libraries
a....
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Studying the book arts in the 21st century: using Linked Data to enhance knowledge and context (a case study) presented at the 2014 RBMS Preconference

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Studying the book arts in the 21st century: using Linked Data to enhance knowledge and context (a case study) presented at the 2014 RBMS Preconference

  1. 1. Studying the Book Arts in the 21st Century: Using Linked Data to Enhance Knowledge and Context (a case study) Allison Jai O’Dell University of Miami Libraries a.odell@miami.edu Twitter: @AllisonJaiODell Instagram: @um_spec_coll Tumblr: umscc.tumblr.com Presented at the 2014 RBMS Preconference
  2. 2. Linked Data “The term Linked Data refers to a set of best practices for publishing and interlinking structured data on the Web ... 1. Use URIs as names for things. 2. Use HTTP URIs so that people can look up those names. 3. When someone looks up a URI, provide useful information, using the standards (RDF, SPARQL) 4. Include links to other URIs, so they can discover more things.” Tom Heath and Christian Bizer, Linked Data: Evolving the Web into a Global Data Space (San Rafael, CA: Morgan & Claypool, 2011), 7
  3. 3. FollowYourNose “In the context of determining the meaning of a discovered URI, ‘Follow Your Nose’ is an informal way to say FollowLinksForMoreInformation.” W3C, “FollowYourNose,” http://www.w3.org/wiki/FollowYourNose
  4. 4. Resource Description Framework (RDF) Subject: Allison Predicate: lives in Object: Miami World Wide Web Consortium, “Resource Description Framework (RDF),” W3C Semantic Web: http://www.w3.org/RDF/ Things vs. Strings “use URIs as names for things” “The most basic unit of Linked Data value is the hyperlink. The most powerful aspect of hyperlinks is their ability deliver combined denotation (naming) and access (de-reference) services for data objects that represent entities (real-world, web, and other realms).” Kingsley Idehen, “Linked Data’s Follow-Your-Nose Pattern”
  5. 5. User Task: Just Browse “We contend that the current state of the discussion around browsing in libraries requires a complete reassessment of what we mean by browsing and how it can be applied in an electronic context. We believe that “discovery” is best understood as a complex interplay between both searching and browsing.” Kate M. Joranson, Steve VanTuyl, and Nina Clements, “E-Browsing: Serendipity and Questions of Access and Discovery,” Charleston Library Conference (Purdue University: Purdue e-Pubs, 2013)
  6. 6. BIBFRAME: Linked Open Data FTW Image from Coyle’s InFormation: http://kcoyle.blogspot.com/2013/05/bibframe-authorities.html Annotation is defined as: “a resource that decorates other BIBFRAME resources with additional information.” Eric Miller et al., “Bibliographic Framework as a Web of Data: Linked Data Model and Supporting Services” (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, November 21, 2012), 8.
  7. 7. Creator Metadata • “The Creator element identifies the individual, group of individuals, corporate body, cultural group, or other entity that contributed to creating, designing, producing, manufacturing, or altering the work.” Cataloging Cultural Objects (CCO) Libraries call this “provenance.” • Book collecting has always been saturated with “methods of recording provenance information.” Sarah A. Buchanan, “Special Collections and Archives Code (SPAC): Preserving Provenance in a Bibliographic Catalog,” Cataloging & Classification Quarterly 49, no. 5 (2011): 350
  8. 8. Provenance • “To better understand the meaning, function, and importance” of artifacts. Lauren Lessing, “Problems in Provenance Research,” Art Documentation 19, no. 2 (2000): 49 • “Documents (i.e., library resources) are knowledge artifacts that reflect the cultural milieu in which they arose.” Richard P. Smiraglia, “Rethinking What We Catalog: Documents as Cultural Artifacts,” Cataloging & Classification Quarterly 43, no. 3 (2008): 30 • “The context in which [materials] are created endows [them] with their essential meaning and value.” Michelle Light, “Moving Beyond the Name: Defining Corporate Entities to Support Provenance-Based Access,” Journal of Archival Organization 5, nos. 1-2 (2007): 53 • Provenance is “the sine qua non of historical research. Without it historians are unable to understand or interpret [what] they are examining.” Wendy M. Duff and Catherine A. Johnson, “Accidentally Found on Purpose: Information-Seeking Behavior of Historians in Archives,” The Library Quarterly 72, no. 4 (2002): 486 • “Who were these books made for, and why? How were they used?” Jos van Heel, “Some Notes on Research into the Provenance of Medieval Books,” Quaerendo 41 (2011): 258
  9. 9. Reconsidering Library Catalog Data “Most standards development work … has focused on the description of records or resources.” Daniel V. Pitti, “Creator Description: Encoded Archival Context,” Cataloging & Classification Quarterly 38, nos. 3-4 (2004): 203 Meanwhile, the description of provenance has developed in the research community. David Pearson, Provenance Research in Book History: A Handbook (New Castle: Oak Knoll, 1999) Vocabularies for Encoding Creator Metadata • VRA Core: works of visual culture & the images that document them • FOAF (Friend of a Friend): people, the links between them, and the things they create and do • BIO: biographical information • RELATIONSHIP: relationships between people • EAC-CPF (Encoded Archival Context – Corporate bodies, Persons, and Families): entities that are responsible for and/or associated with records
  10. 10. Data Elements for Provenance MARC Bibliographic record: Entity identification information: o Main Entry fields (1xx) o Added Entry fields (7xx) o Subject Added Entry fields (6xx) Role designators: Relator term subfields of o Main Entry fields (1xx) o Added Entry fields (7xx) o Subject Added Entry fields (6xx) Name, geographic, and chronological information for publishers, printers, and other manufacturers: o Imprint fields (260, 264) Biographical information: o Biographical or Historical Data field (545) Previous owner, annotation, and reader response information: o Immediate Source of Acquisition field (541) o Ownership and Custodial History field (561) Binder information: o Binding Information field (563) Additional notes about the activity of makers: o General Note field (500) o Local Notes fields (59x) MARC Holdings record: Some of the above fields (541, 561, 563) are duplicated in the MARC format for Holdings Data MARC Authority record: Entity identification information: o Heading fields (1xx) Biographical information: o Biographical or Historical Data field (678) Geographic information: o Associated Place field (370) o Address field (371) Community of practice information: o Field of Activity field (372) o Associated Group field (373) o Occupation field (374) Family: o Family Information field (376) Linguistic context: o Associated Language field (377)
  11. 11. The RAMP Editor • Converts data to the EAC-CPF format • Converts EAC-CPF records to wiki markup for export to Wikipedia • Matches the name entity in an EAC-CPF record against WorldCat Identities and VIAF, letting one import information and URIs rampeditor.info
  12. 12. EAC-CPF MOAR EAC PROJECTS! • Harvard Library Lab, “Connecting the Dots: Using EAC-CPF to Reunite Samuel Johnson and His Circle” • Stanford University, “Mapping the Republic of Letters” • “Social Networks and Archival Contexts (SNAC) Project” • xEAC, User Interface Demo The EAC-CPF Record: Record control <control> Description <cpfDescription>  Name entity identification <identity>  Contextual information <description>  Relationships <relations>
  13. 13. XLink & Triples <cpfRelation cpfRelationType="associative" xlink:href="http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n80106853" xlink:role="http://rdvocab.info/uri/schema/FRBRentitiesRDA/Person" xlink:type="simple"> <relationEntry localType=”author”>Frankétienne</relationEntry> </cpfRelation> Subjects Predicates & Objects
  14. 14. Book Artists Unbound Links to: • Web portfolios • Biographies • Maps • Data visualizations • Library catalog • Wikipedia • Thesauri • Linked Datasets • WorldCat • …More? MOAR! eac.allisonjai.com
  15. 15. Book Artists Unbound eac.allisonjai.com
  16. 16. More about the Book Artists Unbound project: http://eac.allisonjai.com Allison Jai O’Dell University of Miami Libraries a.odell@miami.edu @AllisonJaiODell [Forthcoming] “Book Artists Unbound: Providing Access to Creator Metadata with EAC-CPF,” Art Documentation 33, no. 2 (Fall 2014)

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