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Your e-Learning Investment: How Allen interactions Achieves Business Impact and Boosts Learner Performance

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So much of e-learning created and invested in today focuses on content instead of the learner and improving performance – the result – boring e-learning and wasted budgets! ...

So much of e-learning created and invested in today focuses on content instead of the learner and improving performance – the result – boring e-learning and wasted budgets!
This webinar covers best practices for creating learning solutions that can generate business impact. Applicable strategies and approaches are shared on how to re-align current training needs for greater budget impact. In addition, business impact and ROI of budget allocation for skill-based and performance-changing learning initiatives are explored in addition to process pitfalls to avoid.
Lastly, a unique and effective instructional design model consisting of four instructional interactivity components is reviewed by looking at real-world case studies and e-learning applications. Learn how to apply these components with gaming principles for maximum learner engagement and performance.
IN THIS WEBINAR LEARN HOW TO:
• maximize your investment in performance-based and skill-based learning initiatives
• re-align current training needs for great budget impact
• apply a new instructional design model to your learning initiatives for maximum learner engagement and performance
ABOUT PAUL HOWE, VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES
Paul Howe has been in the learning industry for 20 years. As the 6th employee of Allen Interactions, an expert instructional designer and Authorware developer, Paul has excelled in many roles holding executive level positions in both sales and operations. Since 1993, Paul has provided strategic learning and consulting services for over 200 major organizations. He holds a B.S. degree from St. John's University and has a vast array of speaking experience.

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    Your e-Learning Investment: How Allen interactions Achieves Business Impact and Boosts Learner Performance Your e-Learning Investment: How Allen interactions Achieves Business Impact and Boosts Learner Performance Presentation Transcript

    • ChallengeYou are an ID in the Learning department of the Food Service ManagementInstitute. Senior program managers have asked you and your team to developan e-learning course that will teach food service workers in schools across theU.S. how to serve meals that meet federal guidelines and are thereforeclassified as “reimbursable.”These food service workers work on the tray lines in schools and they mustensure that when a student leaves the line to sit down in the cafeteria andeat, they have been offered the proper items for their meal trays.Note: it is critical that the food service workers communicate properly andselect reimbursable meals. Millions of dollars are at stake.
    • Types of Learning Design Information and Awareness Skill Building and Application Performance and Behavior Change
    • Types of Learning Design • • • •
    • Click on the Railway ExitCrossing to learnmore about whatto DO and whatnot to DO Menu Railway Crossings Pre-Test What to DO What Not to DO Summary Post-Test
    • Exit Yield Crossing This type of crossing does not have any type of No Light traffic control device. You must stop at these No Arm crossings and follow proper procedures. Passive Menu crossings require you to recognize the crossing, search for any train using the tracks and decide ifRailway Crossings there is sufficient clear space to cross safely. Pre-Test What to DO What Not to DO •Slow down •Proceed directly through crossing What to DO •Look left •Get out of your truck to look for a What Not to DO •Look right train •Roll down your window to listen •Keep your windows rolled up Summary for train sounds •Proceed through crossing with caution Post-Test Page 8 of 40 Next
    • Knowledge CheckWhen approaching a rail crossing, which is NOTone of the six steps in safe rail crossings?a. Slow downb. Roll down windowsc. Look both waysd. Obey controls and signagee. Turn on headlights
    • Knowledge CheckDrag each sign to its meaning. Crossing to Rail crossing left Stop at track Tracks ahead
    • Drag each sign to its meaning. Crossing to Rail crossing left Stop at track Tracks ahead
    • Types of Learning Design Skill Building and Application Performance and Behavior Change • Action-based • ROI - Performance • Task Simulation and Practice • Organizational Goal Alignment
    • Budget Allocation — Multiple Projects Information and Awareness
    • Budget Allocation — Multiple Projects Information and Awareness Skill Building and Application Performance and Behavior Change
    • Budget Allocation — Multiple Projects Information and Awareness Skill Building and Application Performance and Behavior Change
    • Budget Allocation — Multiple Projects$ $$$$ Information and Awareness$$$ $ Skill Building and Application$$$ Performance and Behavior Change$ $
    • CCAF Model: Learning Filter Design
    • Less Effective Contexts:GenericAcademic (Book, lessons)Corporate saysBetter Contexts:SpecificVisualRelated to applicationTap into emotionsPersonal
    • Less Effective Challenges:Passing scoreComplianceFalse gamesToo easy - click thru testBetter Challenges:PurposeProgressive difficultyReal-lifeMulti-step
    • Less Effective Actions:Rooted in mechanicsMeaninglessAccomplished thoughtlesslyUnobservableBetter Actions:Require effortSuggest applicationAllow for self correctionDirect manipulation
    • Less Effective Feedback:Focused only on judgmentImmediate judgmentGenericFalsely encouragingBetter Feedback:IntrinsicDelayed judgmentContent-richHonest
    • Instructional Interactivity
    • The Tale of Two Learning Designs
    • Initial Design Questions• What to the learners need to DOwhen they are done with theperformance intervention?• What are the decisions points fortaking appropriate/inappropriateactions?• What are the data points neededfor an appropriate decision.• What are the consequences forgood and bad decisions?
    • CCAF example
    • Challenge revisitedYou are an ID in the Learning department of the Food Service ManagementInstitute. Senior program managers have asked you and your team to developan e-learning course that will teach food service workers in schools across theU.S. how to serve meals that meet federal guidelines and are thereforeclassified as “reimbursable.”These food service workers work on the tray lines in schools and they mustensure that when a student leaves the line to sit down in the cafeteria andeat, they have been offered the proper items for their meal trays.Note: it is critical that the food service workers communicate properly andselect reimbursable meals. Millions of dollars are at stake.
    • e-Learning Myths or Traps to Watch Out For
    • e-Learning MythsFinish analysis, then design• Design aids analysis• Prototypes generate questions• Analysis is never finished
    • e-Learning MythsList learning objectives• Nobody reads them• Fail to provide orientation• Fail to focus• Fail to motivate
    • e-Learning MythsSequence skill by hierarchy• Starts with the boring stuff• “Trust Me Motivation”• Hides helpful context• Postpones meaningfulness
    • e-Learning MythsProvide immediate feedback• Risk can be a great motivator• Don’t baby the learners• Detracts from the context
    • e-Learning MythsPrevent learner errors• Don’t baby the learners• Learners will not think and will click, click, click to get through
    • e-Learning MythsTell then test• Learners have to guess at what is important until the test• Learners have to guess at what is important until the test• All learners receive same content• Learners are typically passive
    • Process — Potential PitfallsRISKS:• No end to project, cost and time increase• Leads to awareness onlyWAYS TO MINIMIZE RISKS:• Define process• Prototype/iterate• Set expectations on what can be changed/when• Get signoffs
    • Process — Potential PitfallsStakeholder enters quality assurance process LateRISKS:• Cost and schedule changes or increased workload with no schedule accommodationWAYS TO MINIMIZE RISKS:• Expectation document• Stakeholder in initial meetings & early reviews
    • Process — Potential PitfallsLost review commentsRISKS:• No trail of comments• Developers get blamed for not making fixes• Revision cycles increaseWAYS TO MINIMIZE RISKS:• Utilize bug tracker systems• Create tracking process (no voicemails or emails)
    • Process — Potential PitfallsMultiple reviewers – No authorityRISKS:• Revisions will be made and remadeWAYS TO MINIMIZE RISKS:• Assign feedback coordinator who validates and synthesizes comments; team review• Everyone get in a room together
    • Process — Potential PitfallsQA Process ParalysisRISKS:• Too many revision cyclesWAYS TO MINIMIZE RISKS:• Require sign-offs• Set expectations about what can be changed & when• Use bug tracker system
    • Process — Potential PitfallsSME’s say all content must be includedRISKS:• Course becomes passive read and watch of content that isn’t meaningful to the learnerWAYS TO MINIMIZE RISKS:• Include SME’s early in design process, educate them on design principles
    • Process — Potential Pitfalls Information and Awareness Skill Building and Application Performance and Behavior ChangeWAYS TO MINIMIZE RISKS:• Align learning strategy with the business• Repurpose models
    • Process — Potential PitfallsStakeholders or learner feedback – it’s too difficultRISKS:• Low impact solutions• High learner satisfaction (But is that always a good thing?)WAYS TO MINIMIZE RISKS:• Use learners for usability testing, not determination of learning strategy
    • White Paper:Creating e-Learning That Makes a Difference alleninteractions.com
    • e-Learning Demos & Case Studies alleninteractions.com
    • ASTD e-Learning Instructional Design Certificate Programs alleninteractions.com | astd.org
    • Michael Allen’s Books alleninteractions.com
    • Email: phowe@alleninteractions.com