The 5 Most Important Analysis Questions You'll Ever Ask

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ABOUT THIS WEBINAR:
The standard accepted methodology for designing e-learning is the five step ADDIE process: Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation. Often project success rests on the analysis activities, yet designers commonly admit that little emphasis is placed on analysis, or that it is skipped altogether because content was pre-screened by a subject matter expert, or they believed that analysis is already complete. Unfortunately, analysis carried out by dedicated SMEs often is completely content bound, with a focus on content knowledge goals that don’t address key aspects of how the knowledge is applied.

Attendees will learn the five key questions to ask during instructional analysis, the answers to which are necessary to create the kind of interactivity that results in performance change. Looking well beyond surface issues of content knowledge, the questions instead focus on the users and how the lesson content can best address their needs and motivations. You’ll get concrete processes that will directly impact the relevance and effectiveness of any e-learning you build, as well as see real working e-learning courses resulting from this approach to analysis.

In this session, you will learn:

- Why traditional ADDIE analysis often fails to identify critical challenges
- The risks and pitfalls of skipping meaningful analysis when starting an e-learning design
- Five powerful questions that will transform your design process
- How to conduct user-centered design to fully include users in defining the desired outcomes

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The 5 Most Important Analysis Questions You'll Ever Ask

  1. 1. Grab a piece of paper or open a Notepaddocument and take a moment to writedown what you think are the mostimportant analysis questions when youare starting out on an e-learning project.
  2. 2. The Challenges designing for e-Learning:Instruction must stand on its own
  3. 3. The Challenges designing for e-Learning:Instruction must stand on its ownCan’t be adjusted or fixed on the fly
  4. 4. The Challenges designing for e-Learning:Instruction must stand on its ownCan’t be adjusted or fixed on the flyMust account for all the things an instructor might do
  5. 5. None of this matters if you or your organization isinvesting in e-learning entirely because of theoperational advantages it provides: easytracking, 24/7 availability, reduce travelcosts, eliminated dependence on expensiveresources, etc.
  6. 6. None of this matters if you or your organizationbelieves that designing for e-learning is essentiallyformatting information, decorating screens, andtesting.
  7. 7. e-Learning, as an interactive individualized medium,requires careful planning for EXPERIENCES that willcreate LASTING and BENEFICIAL CHANGE in thePERFORMANCE environment.Our goal as designers is to create opportunities forlearning that will happen more efficiently and moreassuredly than would happen otherwise.
  8. 8. Analysis skipped altogether Let’s face it, many authoring systems don’t even support design. They provide formatting options, and often those decisions are taken out of the hands of designers by uniform templates, lesson structures, and question formats that can’t be modified.
  9. 9. Analysis skipped altogetherAnalysis “done” already by SMEs Many SMEs don’t view analysis as a dialog with the designer, but rather as a content dump--the opportunity to document their encyclopedic knowledge. Documentation of content doesn’t equal design. It might prepare you to write a Wikipedia article but not how to teach the content.
  10. 10. Analysis skipped altogetherAnalysis “done” already by SMEs It is unreasonable to expect e-learning to create expertise. A more reasonable expectation is that it can create minimal competence.
  11. 11. Analysis skipped altogetherAnalysis “done” already by SMEsCourse already exists…conversiondoesn’t require analysis, right? The organization doesn’t recognize the essential differences in preparing content for individualized instruction via e-learning than standard instructor- led courses.
  12. 12. Why these 5 questions?
  13. 13. Why is this important?
  14. 14. Why is this important? Blah Gurgle Blah blah More Gurgle Some more One more
  15. 15. Why is this important? Blah Gurgle Blah blah More Gurgle Some more One more
  16. 16. Why is this important? Blah Gurgle Blah blah More Gurgle Some more One more
  17. 17. Why is this important? Blah Gurgle Blah blah More Gurgle Some more One more
  18. 18. Why is this important? Blah Gurgle Blah blah More Gurgle Some more One more
  19. 19. The chances of a learner mastering a performance objective when there is no opportunity to attempt or practice that behavior are slim.
  20. 20. Questions?
  21. 21. Why is this important?Risk and Consequences are some of the strongest toolsyou have to create motivation and buy-in. Rememberthat the consequences to YOU or the ORGANIZATIONare often different that the consequences to theLEARNER.
  22. 22. Example: Compliance TrainingRisk to organization: fines, loss of accreditationRisk to learner: personal safety, death or injury
  23. 23. Example: Sexual Harassment TrainingRisk to organization: legal requirementRisk to learner: personal growth, safe workenvironment, successful work relationships continuedemployment
  24. 24. Questions?
  25. 25. Why is this important?SMEs are often quite removed from actualperformance environments and are unaware of someof the real challenges. (Recent learners who are nowsuccessful make very good experts!)
  26. 26. Why is this important?Content accounts don’t accurately represent expectedperformance.
  27. 27. Why is this important?SMEs are often quite removed from actualperformance environments and are unaware of someof the real challenges. (Recent learners who are nowsuccessful make very good experts!)
  28. 28. Questions?
  29. 29. Why is this important?We learn most effectively and most memorably bymaking mistakes, assessing how our performance wasoff target, and then correcting…and then practicing.
  30. 30. Why is this important?We learn most effectively and most memorably bymaking mistakes, assessing how our performance wasoff target, and then correcting…and then practicing.So the most important challenges to design into thetraining are opportunities for the learners to make thesame kind of mistakes they will be tempted to do inthe performance environment.
  31. 31. Questions?
  32. 32. Why is this important?We make our training challenges more difficult thanthey need to be if we ignore the resources and aidsthat are available to the learner. In fact, guidinglearners in appropriate use of those resources shouldbe one of the critical performance objectives.
  33. 33. Questions?
  34. 34. For a copy of a White Paper on thistopic or to view demos visit:alleninteractions.comContact me at:eedwards@alleninteractions.com

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