Designing e-Learning for Maximum Motivation

2,495 views
2,322 views

Published on

This webinar explores the importance of motivation in the design framework for e-learning and present six rules for creating maximally motivating e-learning, which are illustrated through several successful corporate
e-learning courses. At issue will be considerations of content scope, difficulty, judgment, leveling, content placement, and user control.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
11 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,495
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
109
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
11
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Designing e-Learning for Maximum Motivation

  1. 1. Ethan Edwards, Chief Instructional Strategist
  2. 2. The goal of e-learning is to createmeaningful performance change inthe learner.
  3. 3. The goal of e-learning is to createmeaningful performance change inthe learner.(There are a number of other reasons organizations may bechoosing to use e-learning (access, cost, trackability, etc.)but these other motivators are pretty much unrelated toour jobs as instructional designers.)
  4. 4. •Learning is an active endeavor
  5. 5. •Learning is an active endeavor•People learn best in highly particularways
  6. 6. •Learning is an active endeavor•People learn best in highly particularways•Learners must actively constructmeaning
  7. 7.  Learning is a process that must be initiated actively No one else is present at learning event Cannot rely on social motivators Rewards are indirect or absent
  8. 8.  Learning is a process that must be initiated actively No one else is present at learning event Cannot rely on social motivators Rewards are indirect or absentSo the motivation for engagement has to come from thelearner or from the instructional design.
  9. 9. “Learning” path •Reading text with no purpose •Memorizing useless trivia •Struggle with unhelpful feedback (“No, try again”) •Endure unbroken linear narratives
  10. 10. “Expedited” path •Breeze through navigation thoughtlessly •Multi-task watching kitten videos on YouTube waiting for slow narration to complete. •Guess without consequence •Repeat random gestures until lesson gives up
  11. 11. Which would you choose?
  12. 12. The instructional designer MUST create anexperience where the learner abandons thisstrategy.The “learning” path must be meaningful,achievable, appealing, and convincing as apath to success.
  13. 13. “Learning” path •Reading text to satisfy a need •Active involvement in meaningful tasks •Attend to specific, helpful, content-rich feedback •Minimize time of passive listening or reading
  14. 14. “Expedited” path •Can’t rely on default navigation to make progress •Tasks require attention •Guessing is unproductive •Failure leads to a dead-end rather than to default completion
  15. 15. Which would you choose?
  16. 16. C
  17. 17. C
  18. 18. A
  19. 19. F
  20. 20. This willautomaticallyincrease thelikelihood thatlearners choose the“learning” path.
  21. 21. 1 2 3 4 5 6Just say less… Formal objectives Technical requirements/compliance documents Things that only matter to the SME
  22. 22. 1 2 3 4 5 6Make the e-learning more challenging Achievable challenges with appropriate risks Build on prior knowledge Ambiguity is not always a bad thing Withhold information until learner asks for it This is different from just making it harder.
  23. 23. 1 2 3 4 5 6Delay judgment Allows for self-assessment and correction Include “I’m ready” button Increases memory
  24. 24. 1 2 3 4 5 6Pack content into feedback Natural place for content to reside Learner is at point of highest interest regarding content Performing actions results in valuable consequence Naturally chunks content
  25. 25. 1 2 3 4 5 6Create levels of difficulty Challenges grow as skills develop Expand content as levels grow Expand functionality as levels grow Modulate degree of help http://studiok.alleni.com/client_projects/OLI/RailwaySafety/integ ration/index.html
  26. 26. 1 2 3 4 5 6Give more control over to learners Prevents role of “learner as victim” Transfers responsibility to learner Choice areas: pace, sequence, review, construct answers, seek help, choose when ready to be tested
  27. 27. 1.Say less2.More challenging3.Delay judgment4.Content-rich feedback5.Levels of difficulty6.Expanded user control
  28. 28. More information:www.alleninteractions.comeedwards@alleninteractions.com

×