30 Things In 30 Minutes

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30 Interesting and useful websites in 30 minutes - PowerPoint version

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  • In the box put this in to generate a map of who is going to talk about what. ALLA(WA) -30 in 30 Lisa Legal Research Legify Jane Legal Research Legify ALLA(WA) -30 in 30
  • Background Aim was to put all the practical resources of the internet in the one place, so that they would be at everyone's fingertips. To make it easier for everyone to find things without wasting time hunting around each time. Foolkit does not replace the paid subscription services and the commentary they provide. Information has been deliberately chosen that is practical and will be used often. Foolkit has over 13,000 URL's and is growing. What the user sees is "the tip of the iceberg" compared to the computing behind it. So, how does Foolkit survive? Foolkit is not a charity. Foolkit does not receive any support from any Law Foundation, Government or Law Society. People ask why I don't make people pay to use Foolkit. If it was a subscription service then this would exclude many of the users. Foolkit is looking for advertisers / sponsors who wish to promote themselves before lawyers and everyone else involved in the law or before the public who are looking for legal answers. Not Legal Advice Content is not intended to and does not constitute legal advice and no attorney-client relationship is formed, nor is anything submitted to this Web Site treated as confidential. The accuracy, completeness, adequacy or currency of the Content is not warranted or guaranteed. Your use of information on this Web Site or Content linked from this Web Site is at your own risk
  • PANDORA, Australia's Web Archive was established by the National Library in 1996 and is a collection of historic online publications relating to Australia and Australians. Online publications and web sites are selected for inclusion in the collection with the purpose of providing long-term and persistent access to them Legal deposit In building its print collections, the National Library relies on the legal deposit provisions of the Copyright Act 1968 , which requires publishers to deposit one copy of each edition of a work with the Library. These provisions do not yet cover electronic publications. Most of the States also have legal deposit legislation, some of which include provisions for physical format electronic publications, such as CD-ROM and DVD. Of the deposit libraries contributing to PANDORA, only the Northern Territory Library has legislation which specifically includes online publications. In the absence of legal deposit provisions for online publications and web sites permission is sought of publishers before copying a title into the Archive Services to Researchers Citation service One of the most problematical aspects of the Web from a researchers point of view is the issue of broken links. Researchers may wish to cite a document published on the Web in a research paper or publication, but they cannot be sure that the document will still be available at the current URL when their readers go to look for it. It may have vanished from the Web altogether. When a publication or web site is archived in PANDORA, the Digital Archiving System (PANDAS) automatically allocates a unique persistent identifier to it, and this is recorded on the title entry page for the item in the Archive, towards the bottom of the page. For example, see Safety Science Monitor, "To cite this page use http://nla.gov.au/nla.arc-13139." As well as providing a persistent identifier at the title level, the system also creates one for all of the component parts, for instance, for an article within a issue of an electronic journal, or for an image or a table within a web site. The persistent identifier for any part of a title that a researcher may wish to cite can be ascertained by using the citation service . This is available towards the bottom of every title entry page, just under the persistent identifier for the title.
  • PANDORA, Australia's Web Archive was established by the National Library in 1996 and is a collection of historic online publications relating to Australia and Australians. Online publications and web sites are selected for inclusion in the collection with the purpose of providing long-term and persistent access to them Legal deposit In building its print collections, the National Library relies on the legal deposit provisions of the Copyright Act 1968 , which requires publishers to deposit one copy of each edition of a work with the Library. These provisions do not yet cover electronic publications. Most of the States also have legal deposit legislation, some of which include provisions for physical format electronic publications, such as CD-ROM and DVD. Of the deposit libraries contributing to PANDORA, only the Northern Territory Library has legislation which specifically includes online publications. In the absence of legal deposit provisions for online publications and web sites permission is sought of publishers before copying a title into the Archive Services to Researchers Citation service One of the most problematical aspects of the Web from a researchers point of view is the issue of broken links. Researchers may wish to cite a document published on the Web in a research paper or publication, but they cannot be sure that the document will still be available at the current URL when their readers go to look for it. It may have vanished from the Web altogether. When a publication or web site is archived in PANDORA, the Digital Archiving System (PANDAS) automatically allocates a unique persistent identifier to it, and this is recorded on the title entry page for the item in the Archive, towards the bottom of the page. For example, see Safety Science Monitor, "To cite this page use http://nla.gov.au/nla.arc-13139." As well as providing a persistent identifier at the title level, the system also creates one for all of the component parts, for instance, for an article within a issue of an electronic journal, or for an image or a table within a web site. The persistent identifier for any part of a title that a researcher may wish to cite can be ascertained by using the citation service . This is available towards the bottom of every title entry page, just under the persistent identifier for the title.
  • The Internet Archive Wayback Machine is a service that allows people to visit archived versions of Web sites. The Internet Archive is a 501(c)(3) non-profit that was founded to build an Internet library. Its purposes include offering permanent access for researchers, historians, scholars, people with disabilities, and the general public to historical collections that exist in digital format. Founded in 1996 and located in San Francisco, the Archive has been receiving data donations from Alexa Internet and others. In late 1999, the organization started to grow to include more well-rounded collections. Now the Internet Archive includes texts, audio, moving images, and software as well as archived web pages in our collections, and provides specialized services for adaptive reading and information access for the blind and other persons with disabilities. Archive-It allows institutions to build and preserve their own web archive of digital content, through a user friendly web application, without requiring any technical expertise or hosting facilities. Subscribers can harvest, catalog, and archive their collections, and then search and browse the collections when complete. Collections are hosted at the Internet Archive data center, and accessible to the public with full text search. Archive-It is designed to fit the needs of many types of organizations and individuals. The over 130  partners include: state archives, university libraries, federal institutions, state libraries, non government non profits, museums, historians, and independent researchers. The 1050 Collections captured by Archive-It range from subject matters as diverse as "Political parties in Latin America" to the "Matthew Shepard Web Archive"  to  the "2008 Beijing Olympic Games" to "Iranian Blogs" to "North Carolina State Government Web Site Archive". Contact the Archive-It team for more details about subscribing to this service.
  • PANDORA, Australia's Web Archive was established by the National Library in 1996 and is a collection of historic online publications relating to Australia and Australians. Online publications and web sites are selected for inclusion in the collection with the purpose of providing long-term and persistent access to them Legal deposit In building its print collections, the National Library relies on the legal deposit provisions of the Copyright Act 1968 , which requires publishers to deposit one copy of each edition of a work with the Library. These provisions do not yet cover electronic publications. Most of the States also have legal deposit legislation, some of which include provisions for physical format electronic publications, such as CD-ROM and DVD. Of the deposit libraries contributing to PANDORA, only the Northern Territory Library has legislation which specifically includes online publications. In the absence of legal deposit provisions for online publications and web sites permission is sought of publishers before copying a title into the Archive Services to Researchers Citation service One of the most problematical aspects of the Web from a researchers point of view is the issue of broken links. Researchers may wish to cite a document published on the Web in a research paper or publication, but they cannot be sure that the document will still be available at the current URL when their readers go to look for it. It may have vanished from the Web altogether. When a publication or web site is archived in PANDORA, the Digital Archiving System (PANDAS) automatically allocates a unique persistent identifier to it, and this is recorded on the title entry page for the item in the Archive, towards the bottom of the page. For example, see Safety Science Monitor, "To cite this page use http://nla.gov.au/nla.arc-13139." As well as providing a persistent identifier at the title level, the system also creates one for all of the component parts, for instance, for an article within a issue of an electronic journal, or for an image or a table within a web site. The persistent identifier for any part of a title that a researcher may wish to cite can be ascertained by using the citation service . This is available towards the bottom of every title entry page, just under the persistent identifier for the title.
  • 30 Things In 30 Minutes

    1. 1. ALLA(WA) 30 Things in 30 Minutes http://wordle.net
    2. 2. http://www.text2mindmap.com/
    3. 3. Legal Research sites
    4. 4. <ul><ul><li>Legify : Finding Authoritative Australian Legislation </li></ul></ul>A great tool, when you are not sure what the jurisdiction is. http://legify.com.au/
    5. 5. Andrew Rogers LL.B. Lawyer and Founder of Foolkit Legislation Finder & CPI Calculator You can use the Legislation Finder to go directly to a section of a commonly used Act or Regulation. If you are unsure of the Section Number, then just leave this blank and We do not have any pop-up advertising, but we use similar techniques for some of our calculators and tools. The Legislation Finder uses information provided by AustLII. To check the currency of that information visit Update Status for Legislation . http://www.foolkit.com.au/
    6. 6. Malaysian law MLITC http://www.malaysianlaw.my
    7. 7.   http://feefiefoefirm.com/au
    8. 8. http://research.lawlex.com.au/ Lawlex provides easy access to EM's and Hansard debates Lawlex
    9. 9. Oldies but goodies!
    10. 10. <ul><ul><li>Service of Australian court process abroad </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Courtesy of the Attorney-General </li></ul></ul>http://www.ag.gov.au/www/agd/agd.nsf/Page/Internationalcivilprocedure_ServiceofAustraliancourtprocessabroad-A-Zcountrylist
    11. 11. Attorney General’s website Including, details on the enforcement of Australian judgments in other Countries: http://www.ag.gov.au/www/agd/agd.nsf/page/International_civil_procedure
    12. 12. <ul><ul><li>NLA- Gov Pubs Nation Wide listings </li></ul></ul>  This page lists dates EM's were introduced in each State/Territory with further information on accessing copies. http://www.nla.gov.au/apps/govpubs?action=BrowsePublication&pubTypeId=4
    13. 13. Click from tag/topic to decision, open decision, note citation links within decision http://jade.barnet.com.au /
    14. 14. Not quite sure how comprehensive the coverage is for non-Australian jurisdictions http://www.austlii.edu.au/LawCite/
    15. 15. Archives and News
    16. 16. http://www.archive.org/index.php http://www.archive-it.org/
    17. 17. http://pandora.nla.gov.au/
    18. 18. <ul><ul><li>Digitised newspapers & more : NLA </li></ul></ul>  Progress towards 4.4 million pages 0.13 million pages awaiting digitisation 2.39 million pages digitised but not yet available (awaiting OCR) 1.87 million pages finished and available http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper
    19. 19. Legal training tutorials
    20. 20. http://libguides.murdoch.edu.au/AGLC Reviewing Legal research skills - Murdoch
    21. 21. http://libguides.library.uwa.edu.au/legislation_research Reviewing Legal research skills - UWA
    22. 22. Helpful tools <ul><li>3 already demonstrated </li></ul><ul><ul><li>wordle </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>text to mind map </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>google docs power points - shared and in the cloud </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Create astonishing presentations live and on the web http://prezi.com/
    24. 24. http://itunes.apple.com/au/app/itranslate-universal-translator/id288113403?mt=8 Translation Technorati.com http://itranslate.com/
    25. 25. http://thebrowser.com/fivebooks http://fivebooks.com/
    26. 26. http://technorati.com/  
    27. 27. http://www.google.com/ig
    28. 28. Social Networking & Law
    29. 29. The best way to discover what’s new in your world <ul><li>Twitter is a real-time information network that connects you to the latest information about what you find interesting. Simply find the public streams you find most compelling and follow the conversations </li></ul><ul><li>At the heart of Twitter are small bursts of information called Tweets . Each Tweet is 140 characters in length, but don’t let the small size fool you—you can share a lot with a little space. Connected to each Tweet is a rich details pane that provides additional information, deeper context and embedded media. You can tell your story within your Tweet, or you can think of a Tweet as the headline, and use the details pane to tell the rest with photos, videos and other media content </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter for Businesses </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter connects businesses to customers in real-time. Businesses use Twitter to quickly share information with people interested in their products and services, gather real-time market intelligence and feedback, and build relationships with customers, partners and influential people. From brand lift, to CRM, to direct sales, Twitter offers businesses a chance to reach an engaged audience. </li></ul><ul><li>A few Twitter facts (updated September 14, 2010) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We have 175 million registered users. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>95M tweets are written per day. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>We have 300 employees and we're hiring . </li></ul></ul>http://twitter.com/
    30. 30. http://www.linkedin.com/
    31. 31. http://topsy.com/
    32. 32. http://www.delicious.com/ Access your bookmarks from any computer!
    33. 33. ALLA sites
    34. 34. http://www.alla.asn.au
    35. 35. http://allawa.blogspot.com/

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