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Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy
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Robison New Agendas for Media Literacy

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Slides from a talk for the New Agendas for Media Literacy meeting at the University of Texas at Austin, 06.06.08.

Slides from a talk for the New Agendas for Media Literacy meeting at the University of Texas at Austin, 06.06.08.

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  1. The Game School: Developing Theories and Practices Around Gaming Literacies Alice Robison Massachusetts Institute of Technology & The Game School alicerobison.org flickr.com/photos/iand Monday, June 9, 2008 1
  2. Goals & Methods: 2nd-Generation Literacy Scholars Follow theory-builders of 1st generation. Are gathering evidence, collecting data using sociological and anthropological methods. Take as their goal to “provide information about the epistemology, practices and interpretation of literacy xkcd.com/208 practices over time” (Tyner). Monday, June 9, 2008 2
  3. Positions: 2nd-gen. Literacy Scholars Contrary to recent NEA reports, literacy is not connected to large- scale social or cognitive consequences (Graff). Written cultures are not superior to oral ones (Scribner & Cole). What “counts” as literacy is a range of complex practices situated in particular contexts and http://icanhascheezburger.com/2007/01/26/invisible-sandwich/ cultures (The New London Group). Monday, June 9, 2008 3
  4. What Does it Mean if... • Videogaming is the new golf? • You’re not making connections in virtual spaces, or you have no reference for it? • You don’t know how to visualize data, problem-solve with others, simulate processes, think with systems? • You don’t know how to present yourself online? • You can’t maintain relationships both on and offline? • Can’t use the tools, parse the messages, synthesize the information? Monday, June 9, 2008 4
  5. The Game School image © interactiondesign.com.au Monday, June 9, 2008 5
  6. The Game School Developed by the Institute of Play (instituteofplay.org), NYC, led by Katie Salen (gamersmob.com). image © interactiondesign.com.au Monday, June 9, 2008 5
  7. The Game School Developed by the Institute of Play (instituteofplay.org), NYC, led by Katie Salen (gamersmob.com). Partnership project with New Visions for Public Schools (NYC) and the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Learning Initiative (digitallearning.macfound.org). image © interactiondesign.com.au Monday, June 9, 2008 5
  8. The Game School Developed by the Institute of Play (instituteofplay.org), NYC, led by Katie Salen (gamersmob.com). Partnership project with New Visions for Public Schools (NYC) and the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Learning Initiative (digitallearning.macfound.org). Set to open in Fall 2009 with 6th grade, adding grades each year. image © interactiondesign.com.au Monday, June 9, 2008 5
  9. The Game School Developed by the Institute of Play (instituteofplay.org), NYC, led by Katie Salen (gamersmob.com). Partnership project with New Visions for Public Schools (NYC) and the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Learning Initiative (digitallearning.macfound.org). Set to open in Fall 2009 with 6th grade, adding grades each year. The school’s design process “aims to harness strategic thinking around gaming and game design as an innovative curricular and learning paradigm, and actively seeks to change the way institutions of learning are conceived of and built” (Planning Document). image © interactiondesign.com.au Monday, June 9, 2008 5
  10. The Game School Developed by the Institute of Play (instituteofplay.org), NYC, led by Katie Salen (gamersmob.com). Partnership project with New Visions for Public Schools (NYC) and the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Learning Initiative (digitallearning.macfound.org). Set to open in Fall 2009 with 6th grade, adding grades each year. The school’s design process “aims to harness strategic thinking around gaming and game design as an innovative curricular and learning paradigm, and actively seeks to change the way institutions of learning are conceived of and built” (Planning Document). Will emphasize immersion in basic literacy practices in addition to “ways of knowing and doing,” such as the ability to think, read, and interact critically, to solve complex problems in mathematics and science, and to express oneself persuasively through language and media as authors, agents, and consumers” (Planning Document). image © interactiondesign.com.au Monday, June 9, 2008 5
  11. What Do Gamers Learn? They must seek expertise and ask for help, to share expertise and tutor others (forums, boards, guilds). That collaboration is crucial with both problem-solving and execution. Indeed, collaborative play is a designed objective. They must thrive at fast decision- making and know how to prioritize in order to work collectively toward a common goal. Monday, June 9, 2008 6
  12. What Do Gamers Learn? They learn to see the world as a designed space, as a series of systems. Can synthesize both macro- and micro-data in order for quick analysis. Are good at multitasking and continuous partial attention. Phase by Harmonix Studios, Cambridge, Massachusetts Monday, June 9, 2008 7
  13. What Do Gamers Learn? Real-time, immediate assessment and visual feedback. They work toward an end-goal, a quantifiable outcome. They are willing to experiment and keep trying, to fix things, take risks, failure is part of the objective. flickr.com/photos/conexaogamer Monday, June 9, 2008 8
  14. What Do Gamers Learn? See themselves as heroes on a quest, identify with protagonists. Experimental identities, strategies, solutions (guitar player, drummer). Low-risk testing of living in an immersive space, role-playing (a bee in a bee’s world) flickr.com/photos/foreverdigital Monday, June 9, 2008 9
  15. Games-Based Thinking Gamers see themselves as heroes on quests, solving a series of ever- increasing puzzles and problems. They work toward an end-goal, a quantifiable outcome. They are willing to experiment and keep trying, to fix things, take risks. Failure is part of the objective. They learn to see the world as a designed space, as a series of systems. They are willing to seek expertise and ask for help, to share expertise and tutor others, just because it’s fun. They learn that collaboration is crucial with both problem-solving and execution. Gamers thrive at fast decision-making and know how to prioritize. They often practice multitasking and continuous partial attention. Monday, June 9, 2008 10
  16. Game School Core Practices Taking on Identities Responding to a Need to Know Using Game Design and Interacting with Others Systems Thinking Experimenting and Imagining Practicing in Context Possibilities Playing and Reflecting Giving and Receiving Feedback Theorizing and Testing Inventing Solutions © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 11
  17. Ways of Knowing, Learning Systems-based thinking Need to know Interdisciplinary thinking Need to share and reflect User-Centered design Occasion to share Specialist language Context for ongoing feedback and evaluation Meta-level reflection Channels for distribution Network literacies across internal and external communities Productive/tool literacies © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 12
  18. Institute of Play http://www.viddler.com/explore/instituteofplay/videos/2/ Monday, June 9, 2008 13
  19. Potential Uses of Gaming © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  20. Potential Uses of Gaming • Authoring systems--using games to produce an artifact (e.g., game designs, mods, videos, visual texts, avatars, body of code, written texts, etc.) © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  21. Potential Uses of Gaming • Authoring systems--using games to produce an artifact (e.g., game designs, mods, videos, visual texts, avatars, body of code, written texts, etc.) • Content systems--COTS games used to supplement understanding (e.g. Civilization for history, Everquest for economics) © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  22. Potential Uses of Gaming • Authoring systems--using games to produce an artifact (e.g., game designs, mods, videos, visual texts, avatars, body of code, written texts, etc.) • Content systems--COTS games used to supplement understanding (e.g. Civilization for history, Everquest for economics) • Simulations for manipulation--testing theories about how systems work, how principles of design are implemented--as well as for measuring internal assessment measures (data) © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  23. Potential Uses of Gaming • Authoring systems--using games to produce an artifact (e.g., game designs, mods, videos, visual texts, avatars, body of code, written texts, etc.) • Content systems--COTS games used to supplement understanding (e.g. Civilization for history, Everquest for economics) • Simulations for manipulation--testing theories about how systems work, how principles of design are implemented--as well as for measuring internal assessment measures (data) • Experiential context or “trigger systems” for understanding concepts (e.g., play Mafia to experience ethical dilemma) © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  24. Potential Uses of Gaming • Authoring systems--using games to • Gateways to technologies needed to help produce an artifact (e.g., game designs, understand and/or master another mods, videos, visual texts, avatars, body medium (learning Photoshop for Sims, of code, written texts, etc.) then Second Life) • Content systems--COTS games used to supplement understanding (e.g. Civilization for history, Everquest for economics) • Simulations for manipulation--testing theories about how systems work, how principles of design are implemented--as well as for measuring internal assessment measures (data) • Experiential context or “trigger systems” for understanding concepts (e.g., play Mafia to experience ethical dilemma) © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  25. Potential Uses of Gaming • Authoring systems--using games to • Gateways to technologies needed to help produce an artifact (e.g., game designs, understand and/or master another mods, videos, visual texts, avatars, body medium (learning Photoshop for Sims, of code, written texts, etc.) then Second Life) • Content systems--COTS games used to • Illustration--reflective systems used as supplement understanding (e.g. contexts for meta-cognitive tasks. COTS Civilization for history, Everquest for and board games help reflect on decision- economics) making • Simulations for manipulation--testing theories about how systems work, how principles of design are implemented--as well as for measuring internal assessment measures (data) • Experiential context or “trigger systems” for understanding concepts (e.g., play Mafia to experience ethical dilemma) © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  26. Potential Uses of Gaming • Authoring systems--using games to • Gateways to technologies needed to help produce an artifact (e.g., game designs, understand and/or master another mods, videos, visual texts, avatars, body medium (learning Photoshop for Sims, of code, written texts, etc.) then Second Life) • Content systems--COTS games used to • Illustration--reflective systems used as supplement understanding (e.g. contexts for meta-cognitive tasks. COTS Civilization for history, Everquest for and board games help reflect on decision- economics) making • Simulations for manipulation--testing • Exemplars of points-of-view--identity theories about how systems work, how play, RPGs, etc. principles of design are implemented--as well as for measuring internal assessment measures (data) • Experiential context or “trigger systems” for understanding concepts (e.g., play Mafia to experience ethical dilemma) © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  27. Potential Uses of Gaming • Authoring systems--using games to • Gateways to technologies needed to help produce an artifact (e.g., game designs, understand and/or master another mods, videos, visual texts, avatars, body medium (learning Photoshop for Sims, of code, written texts, etc.) then Second Life) • Content systems--COTS games used to • Illustration--reflective systems used as supplement understanding (e.g. contexts for meta-cognitive tasks. COTS Civilization for history, Everquest for and board games help reflect on decision- economics) making • Simulations for manipulation--testing • Exemplars of points-of-view--identity theories about how systems work, how play, RPGs, etc. principles of design are implemented--as well as for measuring internal assessment • Code worlds--code systems such as measures (data) writing as primary mechanic of game play (text adventures, text-based mobile • Experiential context or “trigger systems” games). Writing is mode of action, for understanding concepts (e.g., play thinking, and expression. Mafia to experience ethical dilemma) © Institute of Play; Do Not Cite Monday, June 9, 2008 14
  28. References Gee, J.P. (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. NY: Palgrave MacMillan. Graff, H. (1995). The labyrinths of literacy: Reflections on literacy past and present. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh UP. Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Clinton, K., Weigel, M., & Robison, A. (2006). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Retrieved from http://digitallearning.macfound.org/site/ c.enJLKQNlFiG/b.2029291/k.97E5/Occasional_Papers.htm Lankshear, C. & Knobel, M. (2006). New literacies: Everyday practices and classroom learning (2nd ed.). London: Open UP. The New London Group (1996). A Pedagogy of multiliteracies: Designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review 66(1), 60-92. Salen, K., Torres, R., Wolozin, L., Rufo-Tepper, R. (2008). The Game School planning document: Draft 1.0. Personal copy. Scribner, S. & Cole, M. (1981). The psychology of literacy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP. Tyner, K. (1998). Literacy in a digital world. Mahwah, NJ: LEA, Inc. Unitd States. National Endowment for the Arts. (2007, November). To Read or not to read: A Question of national consequence. Retrieved 1 December 2007 from the NEA website: http://www.nea.gov/pub/pubLit.php Monday, June 9, 2008 15
  29. instituteofplay.org The Game School: Developing Theories and Practices Around Gaming Literacies Alice Robison Massachusetts Institute of Technology & The Game School alicerobison.org flickr.com/photos/iand Monday, June 9, 2008 16

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