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Media in Transition 5: Learning Through Remixing

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Presentation given at the Media in Transition (MiT) Conference in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Panel was on learning and remixing; panel included Juan Devis, Ricardo Pitts-Wiley, Renee Hobbs, Erik …

Presentation given at the Media in Transition (MiT) Conference in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Panel was on learning and remixing; panel included Juan Devis, Ricardo Pitts-Wiley, Renee Hobbs, Erik Blankenship, and myself. Henry Jenkins moderated the discussion.

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  • 1. MiT5 Plenary: Learning Through Remixing Alice J. Robison, Ph.D. Comparative Media Studies Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://alicerobison.org
  • 2. Who invented the remix?
  • 3. From NLS comes NML “New media literacies” is a term used to expand but not replace our current concept of media literacy as it is practiced and taught in schools in order to allow for practices of and experiences with “participatory culture” (Jenkins, 2006).
  • 4. From NLS comes NML “New media literacies” is a term used to expand but not replace our current concept of media literacy as it is practiced and taught in schools in order to allow for practices of and experiences with “participatory culture” (Jenkins, 2006). The NML framework (Jenkins, et al., 2006) reflects principles of the New Literacy Studies theories and cutting-edge research on cognition, which include:
  • 5. From NLS comes NML “New media literacies” is a term used to expand but not replace our current concept of media literacy as it is practiced and taught in schools in order to allow for practices of and experiences with “participatory culture” (Jenkins, 2006). The NML framework (Jenkins, et al., 2006) reflects principles of the New Literacy Studies theories and cutting-edge research on cognition, which include: •multimodal literacy (Kress and Van Leeuwen),
  • 6. From NLS comes NML “New media literacies” is a term used to expand but not replace our current concept of media literacy as it is practiced and taught in schools in order to allow for practices of and experiences with “participatory culture” (Jenkins, 2006). The NML framework (Jenkins, et al., 2006) reflects principles of the New Literacy Studies theories and cutting-edge research on cognition, which include: •multimodal literacy (Kress and Van Leeuwen), •the multiliteracies framework (New London Group, Cope & Kalantzis),
  • 7. From NLS comes NML “New media literacies” is a term used to expand but not replace our current concept of media literacy as it is practiced and taught in schools in order to allow for practices of and experiences with “participatory culture” (Jenkins, 2006). The NML framework (Jenkins, et al., 2006) reflects principles of the New Literacy Studies theories and cutting-edge research on cognition, which include: •multimodal literacy (Kress and Van Leeuwen), •the multiliteracies framework (New London Group, Cope & Kalantzis), •collective intelligence (Levy),
  • 8. From NLS comes NML “New media literacies” is a term used to expand but not replace our current concept of media literacy as it is practiced and taught in schools in order to allow for practices of and experiences with “participatory culture” (Jenkins, 2006). The NML framework (Jenkins, et al., 2006) reflects principles of the New Literacy Studies theories and cutting-edge research on cognition, which include: •multimodal literacy (Kress and Van Leeuwen), •the multiliteracies framework (New London Group, Cope & Kalantzis), •collective intelligence (Levy), •problem-based learning (Barron),
  • 9. From NLS comes NML “New media literacies” is a term used to expand but not replace our current concept of media literacy as it is practiced and taught in schools in order to allow for practices of and experiences with “participatory culture” (Jenkins, 2006). The NML framework (Jenkins, et al., 2006) reflects principles of the New Literacy Studies theories and cutting-edge research on cognition, which include: •multimodal literacy (Kress and Van Leeuwen), •the multiliteracies framework (New London Group, Cope & Kalantzis), •collective intelligence (Levy), •problem-based learning (Barron), •situated and distributed cognition (Brown & Duguid, Hutchins, Clark), and
  • 10. From NLS comes NML “New media literacies” is a term used to expand but not replace our current concept of media literacy as it is practiced and taught in schools in order to allow for practices of and experiences with “participatory culture” (Jenkins, 2006). The NML framework (Jenkins, et al., 2006) reflects principles of the New Literacy Studies theories and cutting-edge research on cognition, which include: •multimodal literacy (Kress and Van Leeuwen), •the multiliteracies framework (New London Group, Cope & Kalantzis), •collective intelligence (Levy), •problem-based learning (Barron), •situated and distributed cognition (Brown & Duguid, Hutchins, Clark), and •peripheral participation and apprenticeship (Lave & Wenger).
  • 11. Where is meaning situated? In order to keep pace with current research in learning, literacy, and media studies, the current media literacy paradigm must expand beyond its “strong text” model (Brandt, 1996) and toward a treatment of media literacy as participation within and among changing cultural contexts over time, through differing spaces, places, and situations.
  • 12. NML Framework http://projectnml.org Play: involves experimenting with Collective intelligence: pooling one’s surroundings as problem-solving knowledge toward a common goal Performance: involves adopting Judgment: evaluating the reliability alternative identities and credibility of different sources Simulation: involves interpreting Transmedia navigation: following and constructing dynamic models narratives across multiple modes Appropriation: meaningfully Networking: searching for, sampling and remixing media content synthesizing, and disseminating information Multitasking: scanning one’s Negotiation: traveling across environment and shifting focus as needed communities, discerning perspectives, norms Distributed cognition: interacting with tools to expand mental capacities
  • 13. MIT’s New Media Literacies Project Henry Jenkins, P.I. Part of the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Learning Initiative http://projectnml.org http://digitallearning.macfound.org