Writing Prompt
• Once you figure out which bits of
information from your sources you want to
include in your writing, how ...
From Research to Writing . . .
HOW?
Why do we cite sources?
•To let our readers know how we arrived at our
conclusions (gives more credibility to our ideas)
•...
What should I cite?
• Direct quotations
• Someone else’s unique ideas (in a
paraphrase)
• Statistics
• Diagrams, images, s...
I don’t have to cite:
• My own ideas or conclusions

• Things that are “commonly known” by my
audience
How to paraphrase
1. Read the other person’s idea/opinion several times, until you understand it.
2. Close the book/websit...
Example:
Person’s name or
affiliation

Education researchers Rodrigues, Sabino, and
Zhou claim that using social networkin...
Integrating your
paraphrase
Make a “sandwich” with your research
information:
Start with your point (the topic sentence of...
Integrating the paraphrase

research

transition

Topic sentence

Although some teachers resist the idea of using
Facebook...
P.S. Here’s how the two citation
pieces fit together:
In text citation:
Education researchers Rodrigues, Sabino, and
Zhou ...
Your Turn!
• Check all your paragraphs that contain
Raw Source Material.
• Have you adequately integrated that Raw
Source ...
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How to integrate research into writing oct2012 1

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How to integrate research into writing oct2012 1

  1. 1. Writing Prompt • Once you figure out which bits of information from your sources you want to include in your writing, how do you go about weaving that into your paragraphs? • If you were to create a “template” paragraph that contained the right mixture of source material and your own ideas, what would it look like? Describe it.
  2. 2. From Research to Writing . . . HOW?
  3. 3. Why do we cite sources? •To let our readers know how we arrived at our conclusions (gives more credibility to our ideas) •To stand on the shoulders of the scholars who came before us – and allow others to stand on our shoulders •Because giving credit to others is the honest thing to do!
  4. 4. What should I cite? • Direct quotations • Someone else’s unique ideas (in a paraphrase) • Statistics • Diagrams, images, sound clips
  5. 5. I don’t have to cite: • My own ideas or conclusions • Things that are “commonly known” by my audience
  6. 6. How to paraphrase 1. Read the other person’s idea/opinion several times, until you understand it. 2. Close the book/website/article. 3. Say your understanding of the idea out loud, to yourself or to someone else. 4. Write out the idea/opinion – that will be your paraphrase. 5. Make sure to include the person’s name/affiliation in your paraphrase. 6. Check back with the original. 7. Don’t forget to write down where you found this info so you can cite it!
  7. 7. Example: Person’s name or affiliation Education researchers Rodrigues, Sabino, and Zhou claim that using social networking media in online classrooms allows students to play a more active role in their learning, rather than a passive role as absorbers of information (1152). In-text citation tells the reader where you found this information.
  8. 8. Integrating your paraphrase Make a “sandwich” with your research information: Start with your point (the topic sentence of the paragraph). Use a transitional phrase or word to bring in your research. End with your conclusions or a summary of the research, in your own words.
  9. 9. Integrating the paraphrase research transition Topic sentence Although some teachers resist the idea of using Facebook in the classroom, there is evidence that incorporating such social media can benefit student learning. For example, education researchers Rodrigues, Sabino, and Zhou claim that using social networking media in online classrooms allows students to play a more active role in their learning, rather than a passive role as absorbers of information (1152). It seems possible that if research continues to support its use, more teachers will soon be encouraging their students to Tweet and Facebook in the classroom. End the paragraph with your summary/conclusions
  10. 10. P.S. Here’s how the two citation pieces fit together: In text citation: Education researchers Rodrigues, Sabino, and Zhou claim that . . . than a passive role as absorbers of information (1152). Works Cited citation: Rodrigues, Jay, Frank Sabino, and Louise Zhou. “Enhancing E-Learning Experience with Online Social Networks.” IET Communications 5.8 (2011): 1147-1154. Academic Search Premier. Web. 24 Oct. 2012.
  11. 11. Your Turn! • Check all your paragraphs that contain Raw Source Material. • Have you adequately integrated that Raw Source Material using the Sandwich Method? • Does each Paragraph have a strong Topic Sentence that represents your ideas? Does each paragraph have a concluding sentence/transition?

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