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Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12
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Agenda and sentence structure ppt day 12

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  • 1. Agenda • Sentence Structure Presentation • Your Turn! – Practice Identifying Sentence Types. • Discussion – Anxiety • Closing • Homework: 1) Find Potential Source Number 3; do summary exercise. • 2) Work on E.E. Intro and/or E.J.R. #2
  • 2. Sentence Types
  • 3. Types • Depending on the number and types of clauses they contain, sentences are classified as simple, compound, complex or compound-complex. • REMEMBER: Clauses come in two varieties: independent and subordinate. An independent clause has a subject, verb and expresses a complete thought. It could be its own sentence. • A subordinate clause has a subject and a verb, but it does not express a complete thought and is therefore dependent on (or subordinate to) the independent clause.
  • 4. Simple Sentences Part I • A simple sentence is one independent clause with no subordinate clauses. • Alisa made a Powerpoint presentation. • Without a passport, Eva could not visit her parents in Lima. • “Without a passport” is a prepositional phrase modifying the proper noun Eva. It is not a subordinate clause because it has neither subject nor verb.
  • 5. Simple Sentences Part II • A simple sentence may contain compound elements – a compound subject, verb, or object, for example. The following sentence is simple because its two verbs (comes in and goes out) share a subject (Spring). • Spring comes in and goes out like a lion.
  • 6. Death by Chocolate
  • 7. Compound Sentence • A compound sentence is composed of two or more independent clauses with no subordinate clauses. The independent clauses are joined by a comma and a FANBOYS or a semicolon. • The car broke down, but a rescue van arrived within minutes. • A shark was spotted near shore; people left immediately.
  • 8. Complex Sentences • A complex sentence is composed of one independent clause with one or more subordinate clauses. • If you leave late, take a cab home. • Spoiler alert: Alisa doesn’t like the second example on p. 379. Ignore it.
  • 9. Compound-complex sentences • A compound complex sentence contains at least two independent clauses and at least one subordinate clause. The following sentence contains two independent clauses, each of which contains a subordinate clause. • Tell the doctor how you feel, and she will decide whether you can go home. • Spoiler alert: subordinate clauses can appear next to and even within an independent clause without a comma to separate them.
  • 10. Your Turn!
  • 11. Practice • Read the first paragraph of Anxiety. Identify each sentence as Simple, Compound, Complex, or Compound-Complex. • You can work alone or with a partner. • Spoiler alert: the first sentence is sneaky.
  • 12. Results • 1) Simple. Surprised? The first part is a prepositional phrase modifying the noun (and subject) “chance.” There is a compound verb (“came up” and “to spend”) but it shares a subject “chance.” We have a verbal “working” and an adverbial phrase “on a ranch in Argentina.” • There are lots of compound elements in this sentence, but it still has only one independent clause and no subordinate clauses.
  • 13. • 2) Compound Sentence = two independent clauses, in this case joined with a comma and a FANBOYS. • My roommate’s father was in the cattle business, and he wanted Ted to see something of it.
  • 14. • 3) Compound-complex= at least two independent clauses and at least one subordinate clause. • Ted said he would go if he could take a friend, and he chose me.
  • 15. Group Work
  • 16. In your groups, discuss the following questions: • What is one key thing you annotated and why? What does your annotation say about your sensibilities as a person/reader/writer? • What particular insight did you feel Collier provided about life and/or writing? • What function do paragraphs 17-19 serve in Collier’s essay?

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