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All aboard- Getting It Right
 

All aboard- Getting It Right

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This presentation provides a high level overview of the components of a successful on-boarding program. The presenter explores best practices and offers suggestions on crafting a successful ...

This presentation provides a high level overview of the components of a successful on-boarding program. The presenter explores best practices and offers suggestions on crafting a successful on-boarding program for any organization.

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  • Hello, Today, I am presenting a webinar on the topic of Onboarding. This session is designed to last about 20 minutes. So, please join me as we explore our topic for today.
  • But before we get started, allow me to introduce myself. My name is Alicia White I am the principle consultant of my own consulting business. I specialize in the area of training and development working with both for profit and not for profit organizations. I have worked in the financial services industry for 15 years, five of which have been devoted to training and development. I am passionate about learning and very excited about our topic of discussion today. So without further adieu, lets get started.
  • Say: Consider the validity of this statement: The manner in which you introduce a new employee to your organization sets the tone for the duration of the relationship. For the purposes of illustration: Have you ever been to a restaurant and experienced really poor service? How did that experience impact your impression of the restaurant? Was it good, bad, indifferent? And most importantly, did you return to that restaurant again? This example may be an oversimplification, but you get the picture. If you have a bad experience, more than most likely you will not return to the establishment or you will be extremely skeptical of the ability of the restaurant to do what it says that it going to do. First impressions last an awfully long time. Takes a just little bit of preparation and effort to make sure you hit the nail on the head. And this absolutely applies to the onboarding process as well. So, with this in mind, let’s take a quick look at the topics to be covered in this session……..
  • During this presentation, we are going to explore the following: We will begin by first defining onboarding- what is it? What does it consist of, and who participates in the process. Next we will take a look at some recent trends impacting the onboardiing process. We will then identify some ineffective and effective approaches to managing the onboarding process. In doing so, we will identify what works and what doesn’t work. And lastly, we will round our discussion by discussing the importance of evaluation relative to the onboarding process. Next screen
  • A recent survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics in 2010 found that workers aged 18 to 44 change jobs on average 11 times during their career. Wow. So we can see that long gone are the days of employees sticking with one company for the span of their career. Employee needs change as well as the needs of the company. And the reality is that employers can expect this trend to continue, unless some changes are made.
  • So, now that we know that employees change jobs frequently, let’s dig deeper and see if we can find out exactly why employees decide to leave companies. The number one reason….. Drum roll….. Is because of THE Boss. Ever heard the saying, employees don’t quit companies, they quit bosses. I’d argue that most people would not find this statistic to be shocking. The reason being, I am sure we all can take a walk down memory lane and recall a boss or two that we believed breathed fire, for lack of a better metaphor. Next, decreased company loyalty in the form of downsizing, pay cuts, reduction in perks, etc. And of course most of these were necessary, especially with the downturn in the US economy that began back in 2008. Next we have Limited opportunities for advancement. This is a big one. Employees expect to be able to progress in their careers. Very few workers are comfortable with doing the same job day in and day out for 20 years. The ability to move around and or up in the organization is important for employees today, of all age groups. Next, employees leave companies because of a mismatch between the job and the employee. In other words, there is a poor fit between the worker and the job, for whatever reason. Sometimes, the job may not be a good match for the employee which results in the employee becoming disengaged and either becoming a performance issue or quitting. Lastly, limited and or poor training opportunities. Exmployees value training opportunities, the opportunity to expand their skill-sets, to be able to perform at a higher level within their current role and or to help prepare them for a future role. And this is where we are going to tie in onboarding. Onboarding is a critical component of the employee lifecycle. But before we go too far, let’s take a quick look at onboarding by first defining it………
  • Here is one definition I really like: Onboarding is officially defined as the process of acquiring, accommodating, assimilating, and accelerating new team members into the organization. Please note the word process. Onboarding is a process that occurs over a period of time or at least it should. So, let’s drill down a bit on this definition. Here we see reference to the 4 As…… Acquiring,… the process of going out finding and hiring the best person for the job. Accommodating…..making the new employee feel valued, important, and apart of the team. Assimilating……The process of absorbing the new employee into the culture of the organization. Lastly, accelerating….providing opportunities for the new employee to receive the training and direction needed to move forward successfully within their new role-at a faster pace, with a sense of purpose that is clearly defined. And again, I would like to emphasis the fact that onboarding is a process because many organizations get this part wrong. So, now that we have a solid working definition of on-boarding, let’s talk about some of the benefits of implementing and manintaining an effective onboarding program. .
  • So, I saved the benefits slide for last-a little backwards-but I wanted to make sure that as we end the presentation- with careful consideration given to the benefits because they absolutely justified the time and resource allocation for developing an effective onboarding program: First Decrease learning curve: More engaged employee Reduce turnover Key component of talent management Position employee to be successful Decrease possibility of performance issues. So, as we can see, there are several benefits of utilizing effective onboarding programs and the opportunity cost of not utilizing an effective program can be very costly. So, let’s move on and discuss differentiating between ineffective and effective approaches to managing the onboarding process
  • Since we have already established that onboarding is a process that occurs over a period of time, let’s start by examining some traditional approaches utilized by organizations that have been proven time and time again to be ineffective. First, let’s consider the fact that traditionally onboarding was restricted to training related activities exclusively. For example, we tend to think of onboarding as new hire training, new hire orientation, or etc. And accompanying this definition, is the picture of a new employee sitting in a classroom being lectured to about the company’s history, mission statement, , vision, etc. Let’s get away from this picture and start to think of onboarding from a macro perspective. Meaning all activities that occur during the new employees induction into the organization. So, let’s begin with getting it wrong.
  • What are some the traditional approaches to orientating new employees that do not work? Any ideas? Well, let’s take a look at a few.
  • The classic ineffective approach is defining onboarding as a training only event. And this occurs by matching the new employee with a veteran employee that provides one on one training. Gives the new employee a pad to take notes and tells them to write down everything that he does for future reference. I love this one. Talk about being set up to fail. Next, give employee a manual to read and tell the employee to ask questions as needed. Well, what is wrong with this question? A new employee does not know what questions to ask. I am sure the manual is big and boring and overwhelming. Too much information too fast. Again, a recipe for disaster. Lastly, provide a one week orientation during which the employee is trained by a variety of people. And mind you, these people are not trained in adult learning theory and end up much of the time doing more harm than good. Even though their intentions are good. Alright, so here were have three proven ineffective approaches to onboarding new employees. By investing a little bit of time and resources, an ineffective onboarding program can be transformed into an effective program.
  • And by doing so, allowing the employee to begin his or her new career better positioned, more informed, and more engaged. Let’s take a look at how to get it right.
  • The key to a successful onboarding program is to utilize a modular approach. In doing so, information is delivered to the new employees just in time….or as they need it. So for example, instead of providing a new employee with information on benefits that will not become effective for another 30 days, wait until two weeks out and then provide the employee with the information so that they have time to review it, process it, and be able to make a decision once the time comes to do so. Also, utilizing a modular approach will allow you to categorize information to ensure that it flows and helps to set the expectations of the employee so that they know what to expect next. Remember, new employees are already overwhelmed so making the process as simple as possible helps to ease stress and anxiety surrounding starting a new job.
  • So, in considering a modular approach, let’s take a look at some of the content that is important and should be included. These are things all new employees should know and or at least be familiar with at the end of the formal training associated with the onboarding process: And here on this diagram we have the content broken down into two categories. Organization level and Role specific. So, let’s first begin with organization level. What are some of the topics that should be covered.
  • Introduction to the organization and key members. This includes members of the leadership team and any other person that the new employee needs to be aware of. Educate individual about the history, mission, vision, and beliefs of the organization. This is very important. Hopefully, top notch employees have already done their homework and are already familiar with some of these items. But of course, it helps to hear it directly from a member of the organization that is passionate about the organization and their role. Communicate expectations surrounding performance. Here we want to have a discussion surrounding performance, how performance is assessed and most importantly, what a good job looks like. Provide resources and contacts- Introduce employee to resources and key contacts that may be able to help them find their way and or assist them with acquiring the materials and or supplies they need to d their job. Provide assistance with completing HR paperwork: Completing the HR paperwork is a stand alone process by itself. Making sure to carve out time for completion of the necessary paperwork and setting expectations surrounding next steps and or what to expect can help to ease stress and calm the new employee., Lastly, Provide an overview of products and services. Educate the new employee about the products and services offered by the organization, how they stack up against the competition, and how what they do ties into the big picture helps to establish a sense of identify and purpose for the new employee.
  • Next is role specific. These are the topics that are related to what the employee was hired to do.. Their job in essence. First, provide education or knowledge /skills needed to successfully perform the job. Some examples can include training on: Computer software programs Workflow processes Technical training   Could also include assignment to a mentor to assist with answering questions and to provide coaching. This is the meat and potatoes of the onboarding process and where most of the time and resources should be allocated. Making sure that the employee receives the instruction needed to be able to successfully perform their job is the responsibility of the manager and or supervisor. Remember, you invested time and money into finding this new employee. Now, in order to realize the return on your investment, you have to level the playing field by making sure to provide the employee the best start possible.
  • So here we have a couple of best practices to look at: Remember… onboarding is a process not a event. It should occur over a period of time. Depending on the source, most experts contend that it takes on average 6-9 months for a new employee to become fully productive within their new role. And of course this number varies depending on the role and the duties associated with that role. Also, onboarding should be fun and insightful. Incorporate learning activities that break up the monotony, allows the new employee to bond with other new employees enhances the learning process and retention of the material. And make sure that the program is not constructed in such way that it is overwhelming for the new employee. This can be avoided again by structuring the content in such a way that it is logically delivered. Nothing confuses a new employee more than information that is delivered when it is not meaningful to them or dumped on them. And it also is a waste of time and resources for the organization. Don’t simply push paper and or check items off-make sure that the information is absorbed. And of course, this is where the input from a learning and development professional would be the most valuable. And this can all be accomplished by delivering the information in chunks. Chunks are defined as small blocks of learning material delivered, reinforced, and then briefly revisited. This process helps to increase retention and ensures that the learning “sticks” as intended.
  • So let’s do a quick review of what we have talked about so far, We defined onboarding, we reviewed some of the recent trends pertaining to employment trends and the role training plays, we explored some ineffective and effective approaches to managing the onboarding process, we reviewed a couple of best practices, and to round out our session today, we will briefly review the importance of evaluation in the onboarding process.
  • A key component of the onboarding process is the evaluation. Evaluation should occur after each session and adjustments made as appropriate. The materials should be visited every so often say perhaps quarterly because things change, polices and procedures change, members of the team change. And the materials will need to be updated to reflect those changes. A couple of best practices relative to the evaluation process include the following: Administer immediately following the training event. And this feedback is usually captured utilizing a level 1 evaluation and or level 2. Make responses anonymous in order to ensure that honest feedback is reported. Monitor the responses and or feedback over a period of time in order to identify trends which could uncover an area of opportunity. Lastly, make sure to incorporate the feedback., as it makes sense to do so. Nothing demoralizes employees more than feedback that is overlooked and or not acknowledged.
  • So, in conclusion developing an effective onboarding program is not rocket science. Does it require a little extra effort, planning, and some additional resources. Yes. Is it worth the additional effort? Yes, because as you recall earlier in the presentation, we discussed some of the reasons why employees decide to leave organizations and training was identified as one of those reasons. So, to quickly recap: We defined onboarding, reviewed recent trends and contributing factors, identified ineffective and effective approaches to managing the onboarding process, and discussed the importance of evaluation. Hopefully, this presentation has helped to demystified the onboarding process a little and has provided you with some new information you can take way and apply to your organization.
  • Alright, so that concludes my presentation. For additional information and or to contact me regarding consulting services, please feel free to visit my website at www. Aliciawhiteconsultinig.com Thank you again and HAPPY Learning!

All aboard- Getting It Right All aboard- Getting It Right Presentation Transcript

  • All Aboard! Onboarding “Getting it Right” Developed by Alicia White, MBA 1
  • Presenter    Alicia M. White, MBA Principle Consultant at White Consulting Services 7 years of training and development experience for Fortune 100 and 500 Companies Developed by Alicia White, MBA 2
  • “ The manner in which you introduce a new employee to your organization sets the tone for the duration of the relationship”. Developed by Alicia White, MBA 3
  • Overview  Define onboarding  Describe recent trends in onboarding  Identify ineffective and effective approaches to onboarding  Discuss the importance of evaluation Developed by Alicia White, MBA 4
  • Recent Trends  Working Population – – 18 to 44 years of age Change jobs 11 times during career * Data retrieved from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics survey conducted in 2010* Developed by Alicia White, MBA 5
  • Contributing Factors  The BOSS  Decreased company loyalty (e.g. downsizing, pay cuts)  Limited opportunities for advancement  Job/employee mismatch  Limited/poor quality training opportunities Developed by Alicia White, MBA 6
  • Onboarding…… Is the process of acquiring, accommodating, assimilating, and accelerating new team members. Onboarding – How To Get Your New Employees Up To Speed In Half The Time (Wiley, 2009) Developed by Alicia White, MBA 7
  • Benefits Decrease learning curve Key component of talent management More engaged employee Position employee to be successful in role Reduce turnover Decrease possibility of performance issues Developed by Alicia White, MBA 8
  • Ineffective Vs. Effective Approaches to Training New Employees Developed by Alicia White, MBA 9
  • Getting It Wrong Developed by Alicia White, MBA 10
  • Ineffective Approaches Veteran employee provides 1 on 1 training Give employee a manual to read and to ask questions, as needed Provide a 1 week orientation during which time employee is trained by a variety of people Developed by Alicia White, MBA 11
  • Getting It Right Developed by Alicia White, MBA 12
  • Utilize a Modular Approach Developed by Alicia White, MBA 13
  • Onboarding Organization Level Role Specific Mission* Vision* Culture* Policies* Procedures* Products* Services* Leadership Team* History* Benefits Performance Expectations* Training on how to do the job* OTJ training* Mentoring* Coaching sessions* Developed by Alicia White, MBA 14
  • Organizational Level  Introduction to the organization and key members  Educate individual about the history, mission, vision, and beliefs of the organization  Communicate expectations surrounding performance  Provide resources and contacts  Provide assistance with completing HR paperwork  Provide an overview of products and services Developed by Alicia White, MBA 15
  • Role Specific  Provide education on knowledge /skills needed to successfully perform the job  Examples include:  Computer software programs  Workflow processes  Technical training    Assignment to a mentor to assist with answering questions and coaching Developed by Alicia White, MBA 16
  • Remember……..  Onboarding is a process not an event  Should occur over a period of time  It should be fun and insightful!  Should not be overwhelming  Content should be delivered in “chunks” and as the employee needs it Developed by Alicia White, MBA 17
  • Evaluate, Evaluate, Evaluate. Developed by Alicia White, MBA 18
  • Methodology  Administer immediately following training event  Make responses anonymous  Monitor responses for trends  Make updates/enhancements to program as needed Developed by Alicia White, MBA 19
  • Summary  Defined onboarding  Reviewed recent trends and contributing factors  Identified ineffective and effective approaches to onboarding  Discussed importance of evaluation Developed by Alicia White, MBA 20
  • Happy Learning! Developed by Alicia White, MBA 21