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The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
The Other Hangover - Final Report
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The Other Hangover - Final Report

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  • 1. Campaign Implementation and Evaluation ReportFebruary 2011 The other The OTher hangOver [the uhth-er hang-oh-ver]: The regrettable social after effects of over-consumption, such as embarrassment, shame, or guilt. While it usually goes unnoticed until the next morning, the consequences can last a lifetime. Hangover - Synonyms: embarrassment, regret, guilt, humiliation, shame University of Minnesota - Twin Cities School of Journalism and Mass Communication
  • 2. Table Of cOnTenTsExecutive Summary .......................... 1The Target ............................................ 3Message Strategy .............................. 5Launch Team ....................................... 13Campaign Planning ........................... 14Creative Pre-Testing .......................... 15Connections Strategy ........................ 16Creative Overview ............................. 18Media Schedule ................................. 19Creative Executions ........................... 20Facebook Analytics ............................ 41Website Analytics ............................... 45Community Feedback ....................... 46Media Relations ................................. 48Earned Media .................................... 50Evaluation ............................................ 51Next Steps .......................................... 64Acknowledgements ........................... 66Earned Media Appendix
  • 3. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe following report provides an overview of “The Other We provide a general description of the campaignHangover” campaign, an anti-binge drinking advertising planning and implementation process, and a full overviewproject developed and implemented by students from the of both the individual paid advertising executions andSchool of Journalism and Mass Communication (SJMC) earned media coverage garnered by The Other Hangover.at the University of Minnesota. We evaluate the implementation of each creative execution and assess the success of each tactic.Originally conceived by the SJMC’s 2009 NationalStudent Advertising Competition (NSAC) team, The The campaign’s Facebook page and website analytics areOther Hangover campaign targets undergraduate students also summarized to determine the success of the onlinewhose excessive alcohol consumption leads to regrettable media strategy. A discussion of community reaction andbehavior. The Other Hangover messages realistically feedback toward the campaign will be followed by adepict the important social consequences of over- summary of both qualitative and quantitative researchconsumption on students’ reputations, friendships and findings related to the effectiveness of The Other Hangoverimage. campaign.Through a generous grant provided by The Century Finally, along with a discussion of challenges faced by theCouncil, The Other Hangover campaign was executed on campaign, several recommendations for future utilizationthe University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus during of The Other Hangover are provided.the fall 2010 semester.A special topics internship-style course was taught duringthe summer term, with a group of 8 SJMC undergraduatestudents leading much of the campaign’s planning andimplementation effort. 1
  • 4. Alcohol over-consumption is a serious health and safety issue plaguing Awarenesscollege campuses nationwide. Despite significant efforts to reduce the • The Other Hangover achieved 72.9% unprompted recall duringproblem, including various public health campaigns, many students the height of campaign activitydismiss the risks and continue to make binge drinking a major aspect of • 86% reported seeing The Other Hangover logotheir college experience. The Other Hangover hopes to change this. • 75% reported seeing the campaign several times a week or moreCampaign Period: September 9 - December 15, 2010 ConversationBudget: $75,000 The Other Hangover sparked conversation. 54.8% of all students reported talking about the campaign with their friends. Importantly,campaign ObjecTives students were significantly more likely to discuss liking the campaign than disliking it (45.2% vs. 7.8%).Awareness: Introduce The Other Hangover to students and increaseawareness of the negative social and reputational effects of over- Message Ratingconsumption. Achieve at least 60% campaign awareness during the Students both relate to and have positive attitudes toward The Otherinitial campaign phase. Hangover messages. For example, 81% agree The Other Hangover message is more relatable than other “drink responsibly” ads. A seriesConversation: Generate discussion of the negative effects binge of statistical analyses were conducted to determine if the core messagedrinking can have. We want students to actively discuss and integrate strategy better resonated with certain demographic segments. NoThe Other Hangover into their daily lives. statistical differences were found, suggesting The Other Hangover message strategy is well-accepted across the broad campusAttitude: Ascertain student feedback on the message strategy. Longer community.term goal: achieve measurable changes in attitudes surrounding bingedrinking behaviors. The jOurneyevaluaTiOn The University of Minnesota student-led NSAC team spent nine months formulating the positioning, strategy, and creative elements ofWe conducted pre-, concurrent, and post-campaign surveys to evaluate the campaign. They conducted extensive research including surveys,the effects and effectiveness of the campaign strategy. interviews, focus groups, collages and photo diaries to find a new and powerful message.A representative sample of 910 undergraduates participated in ourlongitudinal evaluation. The strength of this design allows us to In the following section we present the insights and generalgeneralize all quantitative results to the larger University population. development leading up to the core messages of the campaign. PleaseStudents were first surveyed at baseline, prior to campaign launch. see the original plans book for a full description of research.Follow-up surveys were distributed mid- and again post-campaign togauge student awareness and attitudes toward the messages.2
  • 5. WHO ARE THE STUDENTS MOST LIKELY TOOVER-CONSUME ALCOHOL?The Target TargeT TheWe have selected a specitargets a specific group of students, which we have named Our campaign c group of students, which we have named “It’s not how much I drink, it’s theAt-Risk Drinkers.Drinkers. While drinkingquantities, this group is likely is likely to put themselves, At-Risk While drinking in large in large quantities, this groupto put themselves, their friends and the greater community at risk. their friends and the greater community at risk. damage it [alcohol] can cause.”What is What isDrinking? At-Risk At-Risk Drinking? -Chariot focus group Alcohol a ects affects different peopleerent ways. Chairot does not considering just the Alcohol di erent people in di in different ways. For students, believe the number of drinks per hourhour isis the best dedefinition for over-consumption. number of drinks consumed per alone not the best nition for over-consumption. Our research has led us to a more enlightened Our research has led us to a more enlightened definition of at-risk drinking, blending the dequantityof at-risk drinking, which blends the quantity consequences. nition of consumption with problematic behavioral of consumption with problematic behavioral consequences. At-Risk Drinking: At-Risk excessive alcohol consumption leads to regrettable behavior. When Drinking: When excessive alcohol consumption leads to regrettable behavior. How many At-Risk Drinkers are there? How many At-Risk Drinkers arestudents said they have had too much to drink during a According to our survey, 81% of there? According to our survey, 81% of students said they have had too much to drink during a single occasion. single occasion. At-Risk Drinker Profile As a part of our national survey we asked college students how many drinks they consumed last Friday and Saturday night. Across all respondents, 39% consumed five or more alcoholic drinks. With this as our base, we developed a profile of what characteristics commonly make up the At-Risk Drinker. Index Student Characteristics Average U.S College Student (College Students = 100) Male 141 Athletes 52% 133 Greeks 50% 128 Sports fans 50% 128 *Note: At-Risk Drinker profile developed based on the 2009 NSAC national survey. 5 3
  • 6. Social Lubricant “I don’t want to be the only sober one.” • Drink to gain social acceptance in a group setting • Pressure from peers leads to fear of being left out or excluded • Unspoken bond between intoxicated students increases social connection WhaT drives Over- cOnsumpTiOn? College Syndrome The Triggers “These are the best years of my life.” Moderate drinking shifts to • Newfound independence manifests itself in dangerous over-consumption over-consumption when • Afraid to miss out on the highly anticipated “college experience” motivational triggers come • Anxious to party and meet new people into play. We uncovered five reasons At-Risk Drinkers use to Clocking Out rationalize over-consumption. “It’s been a long day, I deserve a break.” • Micro-managed lives leave students looking for a chance to escape • Alcohol is a perceived solution to stress • Provides a break from everyday pressures Competitive Spirit “I’ve got a reputation to uphold.” • Gaining pride, bragging rights and social praise are the driving forces • Competitive drinking includes beer pong and drinking games • Encouraged to be competitive from a young age Bargain Boozing “I have to drink more to get my money’s worth.” • Students are stressed with financial pressure • They recognize the financial value when drinking in large quantities • College bar culture includes promotions and pre-gaming activities4
  • 7. The cOnsequencesAlcohol Impact ModelThis model demonstrates how the triggers canlead to over-consumption causing expected,ignored or extreme consequences. Our researchshows advertising that emphasized the expectedand extreme consequences of over-consumptionhas little impact on student behavior. In contrast,highlighting the ignored consequences has thepotential to shift behavior among college students.The message ThaT maTTers mOsTThe StrategyWe learned that a craving for belonging and socialenhancement drives over-consumption.A new message with a focus on howover-consumption can permanently affectreputations, friendships and self-image holds thepower to change attitudes and shift behavior. POSITIONING STATEMENT Over-consumption leads to regrettable behavior that puts your reputation at risk. 5
  • 8. KEY INSIGHT Turning insighT inTO a cOmpelling campaign We filtered our learning into three implications that will guide our campaign. e The other m Be Disruptive 1 sha Why? College students are continuously bombarded with health-related messages. They are jaded and easily tune out the familiar. Be Realistic 2 Why? Successful messages utilize situations college students Hangover can relate to. Transcend Alcohol 3 Why? It is not just about alcohol. It is about how over-consumption can affect your social standing among friends. That is what students truly care about. Our creative platform highlights the social consequences of over- consumption. This will awaken At-Risk Drinkers to the full consequences of their actions. Why It Works • Dramatically brings the concept of The Other Hangover to life For most, a hangover is associated with physical consequences such as a • Bridge word at the top of the ring acts as a connector between pounding headache or throwing up. We will change student expectations specific ads and the logo of this familiar term. • Watermark left by a glass symbolizes what gets left behind after a night of drinking We have created a unique twist on this traditional hangover. The Other Hangover is the regrettable social after effects of drunkenness, such as embarrassment or guilt. This customized logo is the seal of our campaign.6
  • 9. drunk”prinT HeadlineThrough print, our campaign uses four Communicates that over-consumption can ruin friendships, reputations and image.visual vignettes to vividly express The Green-colored words reference over-consumption; visually connecting the headline with the bridge words and logo.Other Hangover. Each ad displays arelatable and regrettable situation, which Even though you were drunk, this still happis the result of over-consumption. Theimagery speaks to At-Risk Drinkers byshowcasing behavior that causes moredamage than a physical hangover. Bridge Words One-word descriptions (shame, regret, guilt, humiliation, embarrassment) of TheThe copy is realistic and Other Hangover allow for flexibility and differentiation. They act as a connectionstraightforward. By focusing on point between the ad and the logobehaviors that destroy friendships,reputations and image, these executionsspeak to At-Risk Drinkers in a way thatis more resonant than typical health andsafety campaigns. Selective Color The people and drinks in full color draw attention to the action and the alcohol, which are the cause of The Other Hangover. as sm e n t arr The othe e mb Don’t over do it. Don’t over do it A relatable adaptation of the familiar and overused “Drink Responsibly,” which Hangov incorporates common language used by At-Risk Drinkers. www.facebook.com/theotherhangover 7
  • 10. “The Make-out”8
  • 11. Before you got wasted, you weren’t known as “The Creep.” tion l ia The other i hu mDon’t over do it. Hangoverwww.facebook.com/theotherhangover“The Creep” 9
  • 12. A few drinks before, they thought you were fabulous. tio n l ia The other i hu m Don’t over do it. Hangover www.facebook.com/theotherhangover “The Crier”10
  • 13. Reputations aren’t drunk-proof. e The other m shaDon’t over do it. Hangoverwww.facebook.com/theotherhangover“The Flasher” 11
  • 14. “The Fighter”12
  • 15. PREPARE FOR LAUNCHmainTaining sTudenT vOiceA key objective when implementing The Other Hangover campaign was While this group of students was generally unfamiliar with the originalto maintain the student-led initiative and voice behind the messages. We development of the campaign, all were enthusiastic about its messageknow a student-led initiative will have more impact and credibility with strategy and excited to see The Other Hangover implemented onAt-Risk Drinkers. Students don’t want to be lectured or talked down to. campus for their peers.But they will listen to their peers. Planning ProcessIn the time since The Other Hangover campaign was originally Working toward the launch of the campaign, formal meetings weredeveloped, most of the students on the 2009 NSAC team had graduated held on a weekly basis. Student ambassadors also completed tasksand moved on to other endeavors. We needed to find student individually and in small groups throughout each week.ambassadors to help implement the campaign and spread the messagearound campus. Wherever possible, students were given the authority to make campaign decisions and handle business relationships. The responsibilities of theCampaign Launch Team students on the implementation team were extremely varied, rangingAn opportunity existed for a rich, hands-on, professional learning from website development and graphic design work, to copy writing, artexperience. We created a one-credit applied internship experience directing and creative efforts, to researching, establishing and managingmade available to undergraduate advertising students through the SJMC vendor relationships. Much of the group’s time over the summer wasand tasked students with tackling the details of implementing a real-life spent coordinating with outside vendors for printing and producingintegrated marketing campaign. various campaign materials, or negotiating and planning media contracts.Applications and references were required for participation in theproject, and professional interviews were held to select a team of 8dedicated students with the skills necessary to implement the campaign.Two graduate students, one with professional advertising industryexperience, and the other a former undergraduate member of the 2009NSAC team, shared responsibility over the course of the summer inleading the project and managing the team of students. 13
  • 16. deTermining campaign scOpe One of the first tasks for the implementation team was to determine both the feasibility of individual executions from the NSAC team’s original proposal — and the overall scope of a campaign that could be successfully produced given the available time and budget. After researching the costs of various media executions and calculating the time involved in planning and obtaining the necessary approvals for some ideas, several of the creative tactics originally conceived for the campaign were not For example, after researching local media implemented. It should be noted, however, that even though costs, students in the group determined there was our team made the pragmatic decision not to implement great value in placing the campaign’s print ads on bus certain executions, we feel many of those tactics still have the shelters surrounding the University of Minnesota campus. potential to come to life. The decision to use bus shelters Our implementation of The Other Hangover, essentially a meant we needed to produce more practical “trial run,” should be viewed primarily as a test print ads conducive to a vertical format. of the campaign’s messaging strategy, and an evaluation of To maintain the look of the campaign, the ability of those messages to break through in a campus the original NSAC team photographer environment and to resonate with an undergraduate student was hired to re-shoot several of the ads audience. for a vertical format. Students on the implementation team helped decide how to Team members recruited their friends, allocate the campaign’s media budget, and determined which and also volunteered themselves, to media channels would best reach At-Risk Drinkers. appear as models in the new ads.14
  • 17. pre-TesTing The message The Other Hangover message strategy and creative concepts underwent extensive pre-testing during the campaign’s original development in 2009. We wanted to confirm the message strength and address questions surrounding the effectiveness of the male-targeted ads. In early summer, we organized four focus groups with male participants. At-Risk Drinkers viewed, rated, and explained their interpretations of the ads. Through this we confirmed the messages were understood and well-accepted by a male audience. Males identified with situations depicted in the ads.Adjusting the AdHowever, focus group participants echoedprevious criticisms of the male “Fighter”ad: the bar seemed too empty and the scenelooked staged.Through further probing, we also foundmales are most conscious of their behaviorin the presence of females.In light of these findings, we re-shot “TheFighter” print ad using a different fight poseand prominently featuring females. 11 15
  • 18. CONNECTIONS ObjecTives 1 Reach At-Risk Drinkers when they are planning or reflecting upon drinking events. 3 Provide channels for sharing the campaign message. Create opportunities for the exchange of ideas and Reach out to the community, including campus administration, 2 dialogue among At-Risk Drinkers and their greater campus community. 4 campus security and parents. realiTy respOnsesTraTegyThere are four Disruptionconsiderations that guide College students tune out ordinary advertise- Our message and media placements will be disruptive to grab attention,the structure of our ments and ignore media not designed for them. encourage the sharing of ideas and inspire new ways of thinking about over- consumption.campaign. All reflect ourresearch and segmentation,and make our messagemore relevant and College students check their email, Facebook, Integrationeffective. and college portal multiple times per day. We will be where At-Risk Drinkers are. Established online communities will be used to connect students in support of the campaign message. Response: Community The success of our campaign hinges on the inclusion and support of university Targeting, Prioritizing and Partnerships We have a limited budget of $75,000. administrationwith companies campus community. students will extend made Partnerships and the greater also targeting these Connections will be our budget. with key university stakeholders. All At-Risk Drinkers are part of a broad Community campus community. The success of our campaign hinges on the inclusion and support of university administration and the greater campus community.16
  • 19. campus-Wide invOlvemenTBinge drinking is, without question, a problem that impacts the wider Law Enforcementuniversity community. To make our campaign successful, our team The Other Hangover team also reached out to both the University ofactivated support and coordination between university departments, Minnesota and Minneapolis police departments to make sure they werestudent organizations, community businesses and associations, and local aware of the campaign. The University police department even agreed togovernment and law enforcement agencies. Involvement from these assist in distributing some of the campaign’s materials, handing out ourmajor stakeholders both helped spread our message and contributed to “giveaway cards” to students during a special event coinciding withthe overall success of the campaign. Campus Safety Week in late September. The local law enforcement community also was very supportive of our campaign efforts. Business Associations University Members of The Other Hangover team attended several meetings with Our team made special effort to ensure university campus area business associations, briefing business owners about the personnel were aware of the project, were a part of planned campaign. These meetings also provided an opportunity to its planning process, and also had the opportunity distribute materials (such as posters, mirror clings and cardboard to review and comment upon campaign planning coasters) to those businesses willing to display the campaign’s messages in details. their establishments. Presenting the campaign directly to these business associations allowed team members to convey the messages (and legitimacy) of the campaign, while also providing a more centralizedCampaign staff spent a significant amount of time and effort coordinating method for distributing materials.meetings with key representatives from the following departments: • Office of Student Affairs Stadium • University Relations Student members of the implementation team worked closely with the • Housing and Residential Life University’s athletics department marketing office in negotiating a • Facilities Management contract for a significant campaign presence at home football games held • Boynton Health Services on campus at TCF Bank Stadium. The athletic department’s marketing • University News Service team provided excellent support and advice on campaign tactics, and offered unique placement opportunities for The Other HangoverOur team found university staff to be extremely supportive, patient and campaign, including exclusive advertising on bathroom stalls within thehelpful throughout the process. stadium’s student section and custom recorded PA announcer voice-overs to accompany our advertising images on the stadium’s Jumbotron screens. 17
  • 20. CREATIVE OVERVIEW Here we outline the creative tactics and elements used throughout the campaign. Images and descriptions of individual executions appear in the following section. Around Campus Stadium 46 branded sidewalk clings 5,000 picture-frame magnets with removable U of M football schedule 20 bus shelter display ads Bathroom Takeover in 4 student section bathrooms 1 billboard 30-second ads aired on TCF Jumbotron every home game Campus movie theater ads Stair and sidewalk clings placed near student section seating 25,000 branded coasters 10,000 coupon giveaway cards (co-sponsorship with Campus Pizza) Events 1,000 posters Gopherfest 400 “Missing” ads posted on campus kiosks Homecoming Tabling at Student Union In the Dorms 1,000 branded mirror clings 3,500 door hangers (co-sponsorship with Residence Life) Facebook 400 posters hung in hallways Fan Page “What’s your Other Hangover?” Quiz Sponsored polls Campus Newspaper Virtual gifts Fall Sports Preview ad Targeted ads Bar and Beer Guide ad Display rack ads in six locations Community The Other Hangover crossword puzzle theotherhangover.com Full-page print ads Law enforcement Parent involvement18
  • 21. MEDIA SCHEDULE MEDIA SCHEDULE SEPTEMBER                                                                            OCTOBER                                                                                    NOVEMBER                                                                                                          DECEMBER                                                                           This media flowchart 6 13 20 27 4 11 18 25 1 8 15 22 29 3 11AROUND  CAMPUS shows the timing andBus  Shelters duration of the campaign’sBillboard                                                                                                             various elements,Sidewalk  clingsCampus  Movie  Theater  Commercials                                                                         including each of the paidCoasters advertising executions,Giveaway  CardsMissing  ads  posted                               Facebook promotions,IN  THE  DORMS on-campus events and theMirror  clings Campus Pizza give-awayDoor  HangersPosters cards promotion.CAMPUS  NEWSPAPERDisplay  racks  (6  locations)Print  ads,  full  pg                                                                  Crossword  Puzzle                                                                              Missing  adSTADIUMMagnets                                                                        Bathroom  Takeover                                      Jumbotron  ads                                    Stair/Sidewalk  Clings                                    FACEBOOKFan  pageWhats  your  Other  Hangover  Quiz                                                                                                                                                                                                    Targeted  ads                            EVENTSGopherfest                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Homecoming                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Tabling  at  Student  Union                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            COMMUNITYtheotherhangover.comLaw  Enforcement:  Giveaway  Cards                                                                                                                                                                                    Parent  Involvement                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       19
  • 22. branded sideWalK clings AROUND CAMPUS sideWalK cling messages Contractor: University Facilities Management Center Services Details: 46 black clings; 30” x 40” Cost: $8,392.64 Durable adhesive sidewalk clings were installed on campus sidewalks, generating buzz about the campaign as students returned back to school for the first week of classes. Clings were strategically placed in areas of high foot-traffic around classrooms and near the residence halls on the University’s East Bank, West Bank, and St. Paul Campuses. The University’s printing services department helped produce and physically install the sidewalk clings. This guerilla-marketing strategy required extensive time and care to implement. It required securing permission and approval from multiple University departments, and strategically planning specific locations for the clings to be placed. Details and resources required to implement this disruptive strategy should not be overlooked.20
  • 23. sideWalK cling fOOTprinTsDetails: 3 sets of “footprint clings”Cost: $1, 729.00We developed “footprint” sidewalk clings — avariation of the black cling messages.Each set of clings tells a story of what happenedafter a night of drinking too much. As studentsfollow a staggered set of footprints, they reachmessage points indicating what happened.Footprint cling stories showed how multiplerounds of shots or beers can lead to regrettable,embarrassing behavior. 21
  • 24. Challenges The University of Minnesota’s “Driven to Discover” campaign had used the same durable sidewalk cling material for its messaging in the past. It was soon discovered that among Clings lasted on the ground for months, generating long-lasting exposure. certain groups of students, the campaign signs had become a “badge of honor” to The largest and perhaps most painful lesson learned was that, if done intentionally, these types of adhesive signs are actually relatively easily steal and hang on dorm room and removed. Within less than a week of being installed, many of the cam- fraternity house walls. paign’s sidewalk clings disappeared from locations around campus. It was soon discovered that among certain groups of students, the campaign signs had become a type of “badge of honor” to steal and hang on dorm room and fraternity house walls. Lessons Learned Following the original wave of sidewalk clings disappearing, efforts were While obviously disheartening that a core element of the taken to reproduce and install replacement clings — many of which campaign’s visibility strategy disappeared, our group took some were placed in higher profile locations, making them less prone to theft. consolation with knowing the signs were still being displayed However, eventually nearly all of the campaign’s sidewalk clings were and viewed by students — just not in their originally intended removed and stolen. locations. With the advantage of this hindsight, we would strongly recommend against the use of sidewalk clings for future, similar campaign efforts. While it attracted positive attention for the campaign, the cost of this tactic, and motivation for theft is simply too great. Other options, such as painted ads or power-washed messages, could instead be explored.22
  • 25. billbOardContractor: Clear ChannelDetails: 1 billboard; 12’ x 25’Cost: $4,120We strategically reserved a billboard above a popularbar right on the edge of campus and within blocks of thefootball stadium. Thousands of students and communitymembers were exposed to our message each day. bus shelTers Contractor: CBS Outdoor Details: 20 bus shelter ads Cost: $8,200 The University of Minnesota is an urban campus where most students walk or use bus transportation to get to and from class. Bus shelters provided a cost-effective way to get our message across. We secured 20 bus shelters around the campus area, saturating nearly every bus stop available. Students couldn’t miss our message. 23
  • 26. Lessons Learned The billboard and bus shelters provided large, attention grabbing, visuals. We used the “unveiling” of these ads as a PR hook in pitching coverage of the campaign to local media outlets. This strategy generated interest and news coverage from four local broadcast stations. Was it Effective? campus mOvie TheaTer ads Billboard and bus shelter placement was noticed and Contractor: University’s Student Unions and Activities remembered by students. Details: 20-second ads aired at the Minneapolis and St. Paul Student Centers throughout the fall semester (7 times/week) Before campaign launch, students reported seeing such Cost: $1,000 moderate drinking ads on bus shelters once a month or less. One month and again at two months after campaign Campus theaters attract a large undergraduate audience, and launch, this same group of students reported a significant students often attend movie showings before going out for a night increase in exposure to such ads.1 of drinking. We wanted to reach students before they planned their evening events and to remind them “don’t over do it.” At baseline survey, 13.7% reported seeing moderate drinking ads on billboards or bus shelters once a week, Several of the campaign’s poster images were converted into compared to 36.5% at survey wave 2, and 32.5% at the “slideshow” style movie preview ads, ending with The Other final evaluation survey. Hangover logo and Facebook URL. In light of these findings, we highly recommend billboard Lessons Learned and bus shelter placement for future campaign efforts. Movie theatre advertising is easy, yet cost-effective to implement. We recommend this placement for future campaigns. 1 F(2, 1,268) = 88.079, p < .001.24
  • 27. cOupOn give-aWay cardsPartnership: Campus PizzaContractor: Printing ServicesDetails: 10,000; 3” x 5”Cost: $815Coupon cards were distributed to students throughshopping bags at the U of M bookstore, by Universitypolice during Campus Safety Week, and by studentvolunteers during special events such as Gopherfestand Homecoming.Giveaway cards helped spread our message and attractstudents to our Facebook page. The card instructedstudents to log onto www.facebook.com/theotherhan-gover to find out how much the card was worth.Students clicked a tab on the Facebook page wherethey were greeted with the following message: With the words shame, regret, humiliation, and embarrassment, students read a short, witty story describing why they experienced The Other Hangover. These cards were worth $1 off a purchase at Campus Pizza. A limited number of “Avoid the other hangover” cards were distributed with the winning word “moderation” worth $5 off a purchase at Campus Pizza. 25
  • 28. cOasTers Contractor: Print Globe Details: 25,000; Double-sided, 4” round coasters Cost: $1,919.08 We purchased a large quantity of bar coasters and distributed our message where it matters most. This execution proved to be a creative and relatively cost-effective method of getting the campaign logo, tag lines, and Facebook URL in front of At-Risk Drinkers. Coasters were given free-of-charge to eight campus area bars and restaurants, given to Health Advocates to be distributed in the Residence Halls and Greek Communities, and also used as a give- away item at campus events. Challenges and Lessons Learned Methods of distributing the coasters were An effort was made to coordinate distribution challenging. Students needed to physically of campaign coasters and advertising materi- haul and distribute thousands of coasters als directly to bar owners via two local campus to campus bars. area business associations — but this strategy proved only moderately successful. Additionally, communicating with the staff and managers of local bars was fre- For future efforts, we advise having discussions quently challenging. Often, messages wouldn’t early with the owners of campus area drinking get passed along to the appropriate individuals, establishments, and if a distribution agreement and we were occasionally frustrated to find is made, to ask they fully convey to all employ- wait staff at establishments failed to use our ees that display and use of the campaign coasters, even after having received success- materials is a priority. ful approvals from managers and owners.26
  • 29. missing pOsTers MISEPUTAING HER R S TION When browsing through the campus newspaper, students were met by an untraditional “missing” advertisement. Instead of a lost puppy, these ads advertised missing items such as “my reputation” or “my dignity.” These classified ads were an unexpected way to reach At-Risk DESCRIPTION Date Missing: 10/28/10 Last Seen: A house party Drinkers. In addition to student newspapers, we printed hundreds a house party on Com o Ave. with the help to have been taken from her friends, of color copies and student ambassadors posted the ads on outdoor Her Reputation is believed of a keg of beer and shot s of vodka. The victim was abducte d in front of its owner, as a drunken mess, who said many with. The owner was left uing. kiosks and bulletin boards in high traffic walking areas around and a cute guy she was flirting hurtful things to her frien ds and turned off the cute boy she was purs campus. Our team created 4 unique versions of the posters, each ct us at here, please conta Her Reputation anyw social If you have seen . Please help, her heotherhangover www.facebook.com/t miss her reputation very much. and dating life tailored to a different demographic audience. Donʼt over do it. MISDIGNITY G SIN Campus Kiosks Missing ads were posted late in the fall semester, after the MISSING HIS University community was familiar with The Other Hangover HER DIGNITY campaign. We re-posted the Missing ads on Mondays to reach students as they were reflecting on their weekend. The reflective tone reminds students that over-consumption leads to behavior that has lasting effects on their reputation. Lessons Learned DESCRIPTION Last Seen: A house party Date Missing: 10/23/2010 The ads were a simple and cost-effective method for main- Last Seen: A bar DESCRIPTION Date Missing: 10/23/2010 His dignity was abducted after a hard night of partying. taining buzz about the campaign on campus. Student feed- keg-stands and Her Digity is believed to have been taken from a dinkytown bar with the help his dignity became displaced after a few While still intact after three to four drinks, swigs of whiskey later in the night. With his dignity gone, the night resulted in moronic dialogue, kicked out of the party back was positive, and reaction was that they were creative of a several mixed drinks and shots of vodka. The victim was abducted in front of its owner, spewing.His dignityʼs body was forcibly her friends,and a cute guy she was flirting with. The owner was left as a drunken mess,excessive creepiness, and uncontrollable and now cannot show his face in public until his dignity is notably found. and clever. who said many hurtful things to her friends and turned off the cute boy she was pursuing. , please contact us at If you have seen his dignity anywhere If you have seen Her Dignity anywhere, please contact us at r. Please help, www.facebook.com/theotherhangove www.facebook.com/theotherhangover. Please help, her social without it. the victimʼs social life is in jeopardy and dating life miss her reputation very much. Donʼt over do it. Donʼt over do it. 27
  • 30. RESIDENCE HALLSA main connections strategy included permeating environmentswhere students spend most of their time. Residence Halls providedan opportunity for repeated exposure of our message. Posters, dOOr hangersmirror clings, and door hangers served as a daily reminder to                       nt  students that their image and reputation are not “drunk-proof.” Partnership: Housing and Residential Life e sm embarras Details: 3,500 door hangers were distributed tomirrOr clings students living in residence halls during Campus Safety WeekPartnership: Housing and Residential Life Cost: Free, paid by partnership regContractor: University Printing Services retDetails: 500 clear & 250 opaque mirror clings; 4” x 8” As part of the University’s sponsorship of Campus ReputationsCost: $500 t  Safety Week, The Other Hangover was given one arenʼt drunk-proof. smen ras side of the door hanger to promote its messaging, The other ar        emb     while the other side included basic safety tips Donʼt  ove r  and other information created by the office of Your image isnʼt drunk-proof. do  Hangover it. Residential Life. The ha me other s Hangover t  smen rasCommunity Advisors assisted in posting the advertising clings on The other ar        embbathroom mirrors in many of the student residence halls on campus.     Was it Effective? Your image isnʼt drunk-proof.Lessons Learned Hangover Placement in the residence halls proved effective in generating campaign awareness. Students living inAn effective distribution channel must exist to appropriately imple- residence halls were significantly more likely toment this large-scale promotion. Application of the mirror clings was remember the campaign.quite time-consuming. We were grateful to have the help of theUniversity’s network of residence hall Community Advisors. 96.9% of students living in residence halls remember seeing The Other Hangover campaignWe tested two different types of cling material for this execution, • Compared to 81.7% among students not living inunsure which type would produce the desired effect. We recommend residence halls.1using the opaque material to avoid unwanted reflection and to makethe message easily readable. 1 (CI 95%; Z = 4.592)28
  • 31. CAMPUS NEWSPAPERContractor: The Minnesota Daily student newspaperCost: $8,604.55According to our representative survey of undergraduates,nearly all students read The Minnesota Daily at least oncethroughout the semester (98.1%), and a majority (50.8%)read it weekly or more. Fall Sports Preview Sep 9 A full-page ad ran on the back cover of the spe- cial issue “2010 Fall Sports Preview.” The maga- zine reaches our demographic segment, “sports fans,” and was distributed the day of campaign launch. Students couldn’t miss our messaging. Bar and Beer Guide The Bar and Beer guide is a special issue produced by The Minnesota Daily. The content of the paper introduces new students to the most popular bars and places to drink around campus. We knew our target would pick up this Sep 16 guide, so we surprised them with our messaging. 29
  • 32. display racK ads Full-color campaign posters Unlike posters hung up in featuring brief headlines and the hallways, which were often campaign logo were displayed on removed, these display ads were the front of 6 newspaper racks protected and semi-permanent. in classroom buildings around The messages were also able to be campus. rotated by the student newspaper staff, keeping the ads fresh within Lessons Learned each individual location. This tactic was an easy way to ensure longer-term campaign visibility across campus throughout the semester. crOssWOrd puZZle We created The Other Hangover crossword puzzle as a unique way for students to engage and interact with our message. The crossword puzzle was located on the “back talk” page near Sudoku and other popular word games. Students were directed to The Other Hangover Facebook page to find the answers. According to Facebook analytics, 420 students Sep 30 checked their answers to the crossword puzzle.30
  • 33. prinT adsPrint ads appearedin The Daily onThursdays, reach- Was it Effective?ing students beforethe weekend. Students who read the paper at least weekly or more were significantly more likely to remember The Other Hangover logo than students who read the paper less often (91.0% vs. 79.9%).1 Minnesota Daily readers also had a higher recognition for campaign print ads that ran in the paper: 86.7% of weekly readers remember seeing “The Creep” ad • Versus 73.5% among those who don’t pick up the Nov 4 newspaper as often2 69.8% of weekly readers remember seeing “The Fighter” ad • Versus 59.0% among those who don’t pick up the newspaper as often3 Oct 21 Results illustrate the successfulness of the campaign’s newspaper advertising in capturing the attention of students.“We thought they were clever...and the [ads] in The Daily were 1 (CI 95%; Z = 3.96)very prominently placed which made a lot of people notice it.” 2 (CI 95%; Z = 3.86)- Survey respondent 3 (CI 95%; Z = 2.61) 31
  • 34. CAMPUS STADIUM Tcf banK sTadium 41%Contractor: Golden Gopher Sports Properties (the marketing department of of studentsGopher Athletics) attended at least oneCost: $9,500; includes placement of all materials and ads on Jumbotron home football game during the 2010 fallOur At-Risk Drinker profile identified sports fans as typically having higher semesteralcohol consumption rates. To reach students at football games, we securedunique and disruptive placement within TCF Bank Stadium. Average attendance rate was 1.5 gamespicTure frame magneTsContractor: PPI Sports Magnets were a fun and clever way of getting DistributionDetails: 5,000; 5”x7” magnet our message across. Students not only held on Golden Gopher Sports Properties assisted in distributingholds 4” x 6” picture to this free giveaway, but they posted them on the magnets to the first 4,000 students who arrived to pickCost: $5,135 mini-refrigerators for continued exposure. up their Gopher football season tickets. Additional magnets were also distributed to students during on- campus events throughout the beginning of the semester. Lessons Learned PPI Sports currently has relationships with many schools in the Big Ten Conference, including the U of M. Using an existing University-vendor relationship streamlined the process. The magnets were well-accepted by students, and the distribution channel proved effective for dissemination.32
  • 35. sTadium sideWalK clingsCost: $897.76Branded sidewalk clings were placed near the student entrance gate and on stairsin student section seating. Our messagereminded students to “don’t over do it”and be conscious of their behavior in thepresence of alumni and families. 33
  • 36. baThrOOm TaKeOver Cost: $2,049.71 Bathroom stall stickers, posters and mirror clings plastered 4 student section bathrooms. This disruptive, guerilla-style placement attracted attention and interest. So much so, we needed to replace the campaign posters before every home game because students started taking them home. While thrilled with the enthusiasm surrounding the campaign’s print ads, this obviously resulted in significant extra time and effort in re-posting ads 8 different times throughout the season.34
  • 37. jumbOTrOn adsCampaign advertising aired on the stadium’s Jumbotron screens duringhome football games (8 games). • Static ads rotated on screen before and after games • 30-second ads with live PA announcements during game breaks Was it Effective? Placement in TCF Stadium provided opportunities to reach At-Risk Drinkers. Our ads were noticed and remembered. Those who attended games had a higher recogni- tion of The Other Hangover logo than those who didn’t attend games (95.2% vs. 79.0%).1 (CI 95%; Z = 6.208) 1 35
  • 38. EVENTShOmecOmingThe Other Hangover secured space at one of the most popularevents during homecoming week: Gopherfest.Campaign ambassadors spread the message to their peers byhanding out free posters, coasters, football schedule magnets andCampus Pizza giveaway cards.Lessons LearnedDuring homecoming, binge drinking becomes a goal for somestudents. The Other Hangover made its presence known duringhomecoming week. Messages were located at the right place, and theright time, reminding students to be conscious of the socialrepercussions of over-consumption.These events were very successful, with many studentsstopping by to grab campaign materials. Similar University-sponsored events should be pursued in the future.36
  • 39. sTudenT neTWOrK fOr abuse prevenTiOn(snap)Who Are They?SNAP is a student-led group of peer educators promotingresponsible decisions regarding alcohol, tobacco and druguse on campus. Housed under the U of M Department ofHealth, SNAP presents its message through “be-WISE-er,” aninteractive alcohol education program. Through this, SNAPgives workshops and presentations to student organizationson campus.Why it MattersTo secure a strong presence on campus, The Other Hangoverteamed up with SNAP many times throughout the semester.SNAP offered our group a well-established network of connec-tions and distribution channels. The program coordinator andstudent members helped disseminate our materials when theypresented the “be-WISE-er” program to residence halls andGreek houses on campus. As an official University student group, SNAP also helped our campaignThis partnership both helped spread our message and secure tables at events and student unions free-of-charge. The partnershipactivate campaign support from students currently involved strengthened the campaign voice and helped effectively reach out toin other moderate drinking programs on campus. students throughout the semester. 37
  • 40. FACEBOOK media usage For college students, Facebook is their virtual home. 92.6% of our The Campaign Hub representative undergraduate sample report using Facebook on an average day, spending anywhere from 2 to 500 minutes (6 hours). Our campaign lived where students spend a majority of their time. The average student reported spending one hour interacting in the The Facebook page (www.facebook.com/theotherhangover) served social community (median = 60 minutes) per day. as an online hub for students to connect with the campaign. Our goals included generating awareness and understanding of the campaign’s core message strategy, building a fan base and harnessing student advocates. In an effort to promote viral distribution and online discussion, all campaign materials directed visitors to Facebook. By leveraging the viral nature of Facebook, we successfully integrated The Other Hangover campaign into the daily lives of At-Risk Drinkers. Facebook provided multiple touch points for interaction, including the “What’s your Other Hangover?” quiz, sponsored polls, virtual gifts and paid targeted advertising.38
  • 41. WhaT’s yOur OTher hangOver? quiZ We leveraged an online application to integrate our message into an inter- active experience. “What’s your Other Hangover?” is an online quiz where students mark which scenarios most fit their typical night of drinking. Upon hitting “submit,” students are greeted with their Other Hangover, and provided words of cau- tion for safekeeping their reputation and image. Re- sults can then be posted to their profile and on the News Feed for their friends to see and interact with. We featured the quiz through a tab on The Other Hangover page, and promoted it through paid Facebook ads. According to Facebook analytics, 898 students took the “What’s your Other Hangover?” Quiz.Contractor: Wildfire Interactive (via Facebook)Cost: $147.59 39
  • 42. spOnsOred facebOOK ads Cost: $1,333.88 Weekly ads ran from Thursday through Sunday helping us reach At-Risk Drinkers as they planned their weekend events. Campaign Launch Ads running during campaign Demographic Targeting launch activated awareness and A series of silhouette ads show males and females support from students. We wanted engaging in regrettable behavior after a night of drink- to ensure undergraduates were ing. We tailored and targeted each ad by gender to aware that The Other Hangover is ensure our message resonated with each audience. a student-created campaign. Students were reminded of the social repercussions of overconsumption as they logged on to Facebook before a night of drinking. Generic display ads reinforced reputational conse- quences of The Other Hangover. Ads were also created to promote events, polls, quizzes and applications.40
  • 43. facebOOK page analyTicsThe Facebook page (www.facebook.com/theotherhangover) servedas an online hub for students to connect with the campaign. Allcampaign materials directed students to the Facebook page. Wegenerated a significant amount of traffic to the page, and attainedhigh levels of engagement.3,629 visitors 2,672 unique visits 10,212 page views Demographic age and gender of those who like our page 354 Lifetime page likes 5.9% 1.4% 44% 2.5% 1.7% Female 63% 7.1% 13 -17 18 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 44 45 - 54 55+ Male 34% 0.6% 26% 2.3% 0.8% 5.1%Engagement Lessons LearnedAmong survey respondents who use Facebook, 6% reported visiting As results show, our Facebook page attracted the attention of At-RiskThe Other Hangover page. Results show students interacted with our Drinkers. It takes significant time and investment to properly implementcampaign and used a variety of the tools made available to them: a social media strategy. Many times, it became difficult to keep the page • 1,873 photo views content updated while also executing other campaign tactics. Frequent • 104 comments and story likes maintenance of the page is important and unavoidable. We highly • 420 checked crossword puzzle answers recommend continued presence on Facebook and expanding the user • 898 took the “What’s your Other Hangover?” Quiz experience by implementing new interactive tools to promote the • 1,143 looked up how to redeem Campus Pizza Giveaway Cards message. 41
  • 44. facebOOK spOnsOred ads analyTics According to Facebook analytics, our ads achieved over 5 million impressions. Admittedly, 5,355,832 simply reporting on impressions and clicks offers little insight into the effectiveness of our social media strategy. First, impressions do not mean actual exposure, or attention to the Impressions particular ad. Students are often focusing on other tasks in the center of the page and peripherally located ads are not always noticed. Second, click-though rates can often under- 1,240 estimate the impact of online Facebook ads. Clicks don’t reflect the latent, cumulative effects Clicks .02% of such exposure, and students may see an ad but choose to visit the page at a later time. This is not captured by click-through rates. CTR $0.25 .03% Were they Effective? CPM Social CTR We wanted to test the actual effectiveness of Facebook ads in capturing attention and attracting visitors to the site. We took our research a step further to examine $1.08 the true impact of our efforts. CPC We asked survey respondents if they remember seeing sponsored advertisements for The Other Hangover. Among respondents who use Facebook (n = 732), 22.3% remembered seeing The Other Hangover ads embedded on the side of their profile. Overall, Facebook ads did facilitate interactions with students. Seeing a campaign ad on Facebook and visiting the cam- paign Facebook page are statistically related χ2(1, N = 732) = 92.217. p < .001. About 21.5% of students who saw the Facebook ads visited the campaign website compared to 1.4% of students who visited the site but didn’t see the ads.42
  • 45. COMMUNITY We purchased rights to the domain < www.theotherhangover.com >WebsiTeContractor: GoDaddy;support from the SJMC departmental serverSchedule: Launched Sep. 7Cost: $84.96Theotherhangover.com was created as a connectionpoint for community members to learn about andinteract with the campaign.The website was designed and created to model thewebsite proposed in the plans book. A student on theimplementation team was tasked with handling alllogistics related to website construction.Our website is simple, clean, and drives our messagehome. Visitors first entering the site are greeted witha definition of The Other Hangover, contrasted withthat of a regular hangover.PagesEach section of the website is shown through greenhighlighted words at the top of the page. A largelink to the campaign’s Facebook page was alsofeatured as a prominent link to encourage cross-traffic between sites. 43
  • 46. Here community members can learn more about the campaign background, including insights and research that sparked creation of The Other Hangover message. Future efforts can further refine this page to include: • A list of other schools implementing The Other Hangover • Campaign evaluation updates • Links to other Century Council initiatives Visitors can find visuals and/or descriptions of In the future, a comprehensive menu of cam- Lessons Learned all of the campaign executions launched on the paign tactics could be available for schools to The website was an efficient method of University of Minnesota campus. Event photos implement. Downloadable graphics files for communicating our campaign message are also included in this section. different sizes of posters, billboards, and bus to the wider campus community. shelter ads could be made available to fit any school’s needs. Future efforts can further refine different website sections to encompass the scope of campaign expansion. A campaign email address and phone number were provided on the site, enabling media and interested community members to contact the campaign. Throughout the semester, many universities used the provided email address to request campaign materials. This connection point is as an efficient method of connecting with interested schools, and should be maintained in the future.44
  • 47. SITE USAGE Visits Unique Visits % New Visits Page Views Pages/Visit Average Time on Site 2,327 1,940 83.4 7,919 3.4 00:01:53WebsiTe analyTicsThe website was promoted to the University community through Engagementthe Facebook page, press releases, email listserves, and link-ins Theotherhangover.com attained high levels of engagement. Visitorsfrom news articles. It should be noted that no campaign materi- spent an average of 2 minutes time on the site, viewing 3.4 pagesals promoted the traditional website. All traffic generated reflects per visit. The “Media” and “About” pages were the top attractions,both the power of the media outreach and the strength of the indicating most site visitors were interested in learning the fullcampaign’s core message strategy. campaign scope.Earned media helped generate over 30 in-bound links to thecampaign website. While 24.5% of visitors reached our site viasearch engines, 71% landed on our page by clicking on a linkfrom a referring site. Media relations played a significant role in 49 countries and 660 cities worldwidethe success of message outreach. Top 3 States: 1. Minnesota (31.2%) 490 cities in 49 US states 2. New York (8.0%) 3. California (6.3%) Top 3 Countries: 1. United States (76.6%) 2. Canada (15.3%) 3. United Kingdom (2.6%) NOTE: Google tracker began collecting data about ten days after the official launch, thus likely missing a significant spike in web visits surrounding initial media coverage of the campaign. Therefore these reported results are somewhat underestimated. 45
  • 48. “One of the most innovative and impressive alcohol awareness campaigns I’ve ever seen!” cOmmuniTy reacTiOn - Coordinator, Health Education and Health We attended meetings with key community stakeholders to inform Promotion, Queens University them of our campaign and seek collaboration in efforts. Just a few of the representatives we spoke with and meetings attended include: • Local business associations (Dinkytown Business Association, Stadium Village Commercial Association) • City of Minneapolis office of License and Consumer Services • Liquor Industry and the City (LINK) - a monthly forum for community representatives who own or manage liquor campaign maTerial requesTs establishments • City of Minneapolis Alliance Early Start Quarterly Meeting; a Throughout the campaign, a number of educational institutions meeting regarding safety and civility-related preparations for the contacted our team with requests to implement The Other Hangover fall semester among department heads from the University of on their campus. Campaign files were requested by the following Minnesota, the City of Minneapolis and other stakeholders. universities, many of which have now implemented portions of the campaign. We received overwhelmingly positive feedback from all afore- “I was mentioned parties. Members from the liquor industry licensing 1. University of Minnesota - Duluth, MN wondering if we board and residential housing were especially excited about our 2. Wake Forest University - Winston-Salem, NC might be able to use new approach. Many business owners inquired how to obtain 3. University of Nebraska - Lincoln, NE some of your ads? They are campaign posters and one property manager in particular was 4. Queens University, Kingston - Ontario, Canada awesome and my students really liked the messages.” adamant in placing a poster in “every laundry room in every 5. University of New Hampshire - Durham, NH apartment building” around campus. Much opportunity exists 6. Winona State University - Winona, MN - Substance Abuse Prevention to continue expanding upon the already established 7. Friends University - Wichita, KS Coordinator,Wake Forest University relationships with community members. 8. *RTR High School - Tyler, MN 9. *Kirkland Lake Alcohol and Drug Awareness Coalition (requested for high schools) - Ontario, Canada *Note: For both high school inquiries, we politely declined the material request — explaining the campaign was designed for a college audience. 46
  • 49. mixed feedbacKWhile the vast majority of community feedback regarding the We took these concerns very seriously — and even participated incampaign was positive, it should be noted that some community a meeting to listen to the specific concerns of the few communitymembers questioned the strategy of the campaign — and a small members. The meeting was productive and helped our team tonumber of individuals expressed strong criticism regarding some of better understand these perspectives.the images and messages within the advertising.Message StrategySome community members questioned the campaign’s core strategy,wondering why we hadn’t addressed other important factors such as Reputations aren’t drunk-proof.health, safety or legal issues frequently associated with over-consumption. For example: “There are a lot worse things related to binge-drinking than hurt- ing your reputation, such as dying from alcohol poisoning or getting e The other m sha a DWI…I think the campaign’s focus on friendships and reputation doesn’t convey the seriousness of the issue.” - Survey respondent Don’t over do it. Hangover www.facebook.com/theotherhangoverWe agree there are worse consequences that can result from alcoholover-consumption. However, these message strategies are consistent- While negative impressions toward the campaign were held by aly shown to be ineffective for a college audience. small minority of community members, it is important to acknowl- edge these concerns — especially for any institutions which may be considering the use of The Other Hangover on their own campus inBehavioral Consequences the future.In addition, a few community members expressed concern that Almost no anti-binge drinking advertising campaign could bethemes and images within the campaign could be interpreted as implemented without at least some criticism from the communitysexist or somehow conveyed notions of “victim blaming,” especially regarding the particular creative approach or message strategy used.related to women. A diverse community is likely to have a broad range of opinions and reactions to any campaign, especially one intended to be edgy andThese concerns primarily focused on two of the print ads — one attention-grabbing. While the community concerns and criticismsdubbed “The Flasher” (with the headline “Reputations Aren’t Drunk- outlined here should not be ignored, we would again like to empha-Proof ”) and the other dubbed “Make-Out” (with the headline “Even sis the strategy and creative messaging of The Other Hangover werethough you were drunk, this still happened.”) In particular, some ex- generally very well-received.pressed frustration that ads could serve to objectify the female body,or otherwise reinforce negative stereotypes. 47
  • 50. MEDIA RELATIONSA full communications strategy was developed to promote the U of M Brief: a weekly internal news digest distributedofficial launch of the campaign. A press release and campaign to faculty and staff at all University of Minnesotaoverview brief helped convey the scope of the project and campuses statewidebackground of our message. University Parent Communications: an email sent to all subscribed University parentsinTernal cOmmunicaTiOns SJMC Murphy Weekly: an email digest sent toCommunication efforts were carefully timed, to ensure key students enrolled in the School of Journalism and Massmembers of the University community were made aware of the Communicationcampaign prior to campaign launch.Brief campaign announcements were distributed to our most important secondary audiences: University staff, faculty, parents, Murphy Reporter:and the University’s Board of Regents. secured front-page Murphy Reporter coverage and a multi- School of Jornalism & Mass Communication WINTER 2011 page spread in the SJMC SJMC students tap sweet spot ofMessage Outlets alumni magazine near the anti-binge drinking target messagesAs a result of this outreach, the launch of The Other Hangover was end of the campaign.featured in a number of communication outlets University-wide.Each story provided details about the campaign and informed thecampus community of our messages. College of Liberal Arts, News and Events: a website visited by all university community inside Magazine production class offers students real-world experience SJMC alum Bob Fransen looks back at 50 years of shaping Twin Cities broadcasting Three new faculty members build SJMC’s journalism, strategic communication expertise48
  • 51. exTernal cOmmunicaTiOnsOur team targeted a significant number of local media outlets to Both the local ABC and CBS affiliates came to campus to interview cover the launch of the campaign. students and capture video footage of the advertising.The WorkMembers of the implementation team worked with the University’s The local NBC station News Service office to pitch the story of the campaign’s launch to local covered the launch ofnewspaper and broadcast television news directors. the campaign in mul- tiple news broadcasts,In addition, our team worked closely with the University’s and the Twin Citiescommunications staff to pursue coverage in a number of national FOX station invited thenews and education focused media outlets. campaign’s graduate advisors to appear for aThe Reward live interview during itsOver the course of the launch, the campaign received excellent local morning show program.media coverage, with positive stories appearing in the top broadcastand newspaper outlets in the metro area. It was also through these efforts that stories dedicated to The Other Hangover appeared within the WashingtonPost.com higher education blog, as well as in many other independent news and blog outlets. A general overview of earned media is outlined on the next page. “Well done to all involved. Your core insight is very powerful and well-executed” - Jeff Swystun, Chief Communications Officer, DDB 49
  • 52. earned media 28 BROADCAST ONLINE unique news stories Television Listserv 5 unique broadcast news segments Stories sent through 3 email listserves 7 1/2 • 4 local Mpls/ St. Paul network affiliates (NBC, ABC, • U of M parent Email, Faculty and Staff Brief, minutes earned airtime CBS, FOX) Murphy Weekly (SJMC listserv) 10,140 PRINT News Digests words published Newspaper 3 unique online news digests 4 unique stories appearing in print and online editions • MPR.org (Minnesota Public Radio), 440 • The Star Tribune, Minnesota Daily (2), The Wake theGlobeandMail.com (Toronto Canada story “likes” and newspaper), Alcohol in Moderation Facebook shares Magazine Blogs 597 3 unique magazine articles 10 known blog stories comments posted in • Minnesota (U of M Alumni magazine), Platform stories • DDB.com worldwide advertising agency Magazine (an online magazine published by students corporate blog, Star Tribune Campus Connect 37 at the University of Alabama), and a feature story with blog, Jezebel.com, Sodahead, The Frisky, It’s pictures embedded pictures appearing on the front cover of The Murphy YowYow, Widdel Online, Leah Michele, Not my in stories Reporter (the SJMC alumni magazine) Edgar, and The Last Story Bender Anti-binge drinking Ads to be displAyed At U: the Ads will focUs on the sociAl side effects binge drinking cAn hAVe Drunk nights get ugly “Reputations aRen’t dRunk-pRoof”: the otheR hangoveRALCOHOL MESSAGES in aD campaignU. of Minnesota exposes ‘the other hangover’CAMPAIGN TO COMBAT BINGE DRINKING The STudenT-Led FighT AgAinST Binge drinking A CAMPAIGN TO REDUCE HIGH-RISK DRINKING BEHAVIOR AMONG U STUDENTS LAUNCHES THIS WEEKAttAcking Binge Drinking At the U of M Learn what Drinking aDs: U of M US StUdentS learn aboUt the ‘other hangover’ the Other groUp creates aD caMpaign Beware the Other hangOver hangOver is 50
  • 53. EVALUATION A comprehensive impact assessment was developed to analyze In addition to these three surveys, the design also incorporated an campaign outcomes from our initial implementation of The Other additional “post-only” cross-sectional survey administered Hangover. The evaluation design was constructed following simultaneously with the final-wave panel survey. This independent significant review of health campaign evaluation designs found within survey was distributed to a separate group of 439 randomly selected the academic literature and through a number of discussions with undergraduate students, none of whom had participated in the University faculty with specific expertise in health campaign ongoing longitudinal surveys. evaluation. We selected a rigorous methodological design to help yield credible conclusions about the effects of The Other Hangover The addition of this fourth survey allowed for statistical comparison messaging. between the two evaluations taken following the end of the campaign, and tested whether any sort of “Hawthorne” effect was evident among At the core of our evaluation was a longitudinal style panel design student participants taking part in the panel survey. Put another way, using a series of three surveys which were distributed to the same our design tested whether students taking part in the longitudinal sur- group of respondents before, during, and after the official run of the veys were self-conscious of their participation in our evaluation — and campaign. This design allowed for the tracking of aggregate-level thus provided results which were statistically different from the group changes in attitudes and reported behavior among the survey taking part only in the single follow-up evaluation survey. participants over time. With the assistance of the University’s Office of Student Affairs, we distributed an official university-sponsored email to a random sample of undergraduate students, inviting them to participate in the research study. Follow-up surveys were then emailed to the same population of respondents in mid-October and again in December following the official end of the campaign.Ethics approval for the project was received from the University of Minnesota IRB on July 30. 51
  • 54. sampling sTraTegy quesTiOnnaireWhile The Other Hangover campaign is designed to be most effective with The questionnaire was constructed using items proven valid and reliable byits intended target audience of At-Risk Drinkers, it was important to past academic research. Measures were adopted from well-cited surveys,determine campaign reception from the larger undergraduate community. including the College Alcohol Study, the College Student Health survey, theTherefore, the sampling frame included all undergraduates enrolled at the Core Alcohol and Drug Survey and the NSAC team’s own original nationalUniversity of Minnesota – Twin Cities campus during the 2010 fall survey of peers. Peer-reviewed journals and nationally sponsored alcoholsemester. campaign evaluations also provided guidance.Generalizability In an effort to ensure high levels of validity and to allow for optimal dataA representative undergraduate sample was recruited with the assistance of comparisons, wherever possible we adopted measures directly fromthe University administration. A random sample of 5,000 undergraduates existing validated surveys or otherwise modeled the wording of ourwas sent a University-sponsored email inviting them to participate in the measures based upon similar questions in existing surveys.research study. A full description of the study as well as a survey link wasembedded in the email. The first 500 participants to complete the survey Many of our measures came from the College Student Health Survey, aformed our official panel. survey that has been administered by Boynton Health Service to students at the University or Minnesota and other Minnesota schools since 1995.Survey implementation was coordinated through the University’s College Using these measures, from a survey that has been regularly administeredof Liberal Arts Office of Information Technology (CLA-OIT). Along with to our target population over the past 15 years, provides an opportunity tothe ability to adhere to IRB data protection protocol and regulations related compare our results against retrospective data, and to track subtle changesto the use of student email addresses, utilization of the CLA-OIT services from past to present.was preferable because staff in this department have significant experienceboth in administering online surveys to the University population and insafeguarding large amounts of important data. All personal information Our team outlined the following general benchmarks as indicatorswas stored in a separate database and could not be matched to participants’ of success for the initial implementation of The Other Hangover:survey responses.Survey respondents were compensated for participation. Students participating in campaign evaluation surveys were mailed $5 Target gift • At least 60% campaign awareness among undergraduatescards following their completion of each of the first two surveys, as well • Positive attitudes toward the message strategy and the adsas a larger $10 gift card for completion of the third and final survey. This • Comprehension and integration of the message strategystrategy reduced attrition and encouraged students to complete all three • For at least 50% to report having talked about the campaignsurveys within the design. The group of students recruited for the “post- • For a majority to report having positive conversations about Theonly” cross-section survey were also mailed a $10 gift card for completion Other Hangoverof the evaluation survey. 52
  • 55. Demographic Profile ofSurvey Respondents resulTs % all students A total representative sample of 910 undergraduates participated in the Under 18 2.4 18-20 55.8 campaign evaluation. The panel group was surveyed at baseline prior to 21-25 35.9 the official campaign launch in September (n = 471), again in October 26 or over 5.8 during the peak of campaign activities (n = 468), and final again in mid- Average Age (years) 21 December following the end of official campaign promotion (n = 412). Collegiate Status Freshman 22.1 A different cross-section of undergraduates was also sampled at the end Sophomore 18.6 of the campaign (n = 439). The “third wave” panel and cross-section Junior 24.2 groups were compared on key alcohol and campaign-related indicators Senior 28.7 to determine if differences existed in responses. Differences between Alcohol Use Other 6.4 groups would indicate if a potential “Hawthorn effect” had occurred, in Drank alcohol in past 12 months which participation in the evaluation might have caused panel Freshman 65.4% Gender Female 65.7 participants to became “primed” and thus respond in a biased manner. Sophomore 72.8% Male 34.1 Junior 83.5% Transgender 0.3 A series of t-tests indicated campaign recognition and free recall, as well Senior 86.1% as alcohol consumption patterns did not differ between the two groups. Other 76.4% Ethnic Origin Data from the “third wave” panel and cross-section were then combined Consumed 5 or more drinks White-Not Hispanic 77.7 (n = 851) to form the final survey group evaluation. This group of in a sitting in the past 2 weeks Asian/Pacific Islander 12.2 None Latino/Hispanic 2.8 respondents is used for all statistical analyses related specifically to 41.8% Once 16.6% Black-Not Hispanic 2.7 campaign awareness and message assessment. Twice 7.5% Mixed Heritage 2.8 3-5 times 16.6% Other 1.8 Analyses regarding changes in exposure, or alcohol-related attitudes over 6-9 times 0.8% time compare data from the baseline, mid, and post campaign surveys. Enrollment % of all drinkers who drank 5 or Full-time (12+ credits) 92.1 more drinks in the past 2 weeks Part-time (1-11 credits) 7.9 The hybrid panel-pre/post design with the random selection of Female 37.8% Average GPA 3.43 participants offers a valid method of assessing the true effects of the Male 52.9% campaign among a diverse undergraduate sample. Residence Location On-campus 53.5 Lifestyle Characteristics Off-campus 46.5 18.3% Intercollegiate/intramural athlete Sports Fan 39.0% Residence Type 7.7% Residence Hall 26.1 Fraternity/Sorority member Resident Advisor 1.1% Fraternity/Sorority 2.2 Took Alcohol & College Life course 6.3% Other 71.7 53
  • 56. aWareness Encoded exposure was measured by a series of recognition and recall-based questions. Results illustrate how placement, frequency and relevancy of campaign materials converged to create high levels of campaign awareness and memory for specific executions. Recall Free recall was first assessed by asking respondents to name any anti-binge drinking ads they recently saw. This same question was asked for all survey waves to measure the effect over time. Our survey taken during the height of campaign activity (wave 2) resulted in the highest levels of free recall. The final survey, after campaign activity ended, had slightly lower levels of unprompted recall (58.2%). This is explained by a termination in billboard and bus shelter ad space near the end of the campaign. During the second wave of the survey, 63.3% responded by indicating “The Other Hangover,” and an additional 9.6% described The Other Hangover materials, but did not reference the campaign by name. Combined,The Other Hangover achieved 72.9% unprompted recall during the height of campaign activity.54
  • 57. Recognition: Campaign Logo Are There Differences in Exposure? Full-time students and those who live on-campus were moreAbout 71% (n = 606) of respondents indicated they’ve seen, read, or heard likely to remember seeing The Other Hangover campaignsomething in the media or in advertising about binge drinking or the effects than part-time students and students living off-campus.of drinking too much. Of those positive respondents: The other Hangover 86% reported seeing The Other Hangover logo on advertising around campus 75% reported seeing the campaign several times a week or more Recognizing and recalling materials from The Other Hangover is significantly related to enrollment χ2 (1, N = 566) = 31.56, p < .001 and living status χ2(1, N = 566) = 35.98, p < .001. 55
  • 58. The Creep Featured on a billboard, a full-page color ad in The Daily, Recognition: Campaign Print Ads 85% and posted on 4 bus shelters Next, our survey assessed recognition for specific campaign advertisements. A visual of each ad rotated on the computer screen and students were asked to indicate if they had seen the advertisement before. The Fighter Featured as a full-page color ad in The Daily and Reported recognition of specific 65% located on 3 bus shelters advertisements generally mirrored the potential for exposure to each ad execution, based on the number of ads placed in the The campus environment. Unless noted, the number of print ads distributed around Make-out Used for three bus shelter ads campus for each execution was the same. 55% The Crier Used for three bus shelter ads “I remember certain sayings such as ‘Friend- 40% ships aren’t drunk-proof ’ and ‘Before you got drunk you weren’t known as the creep.’ The visuals are pretty unforgettable with the black and white with green accents.” The Flasher Used for three bus shelter ads, but was not distributed to - Survey respondent 35% the residence halls along with the other ads56
  • 59. message raTingA series of questions asked students their perception of The Other Hangovercampaign messages compared to previous anti-binge drinking campaigns. ComprehensionWe know traditional health and safety PSA messages are generally not well Less than 3% of student respondents thought The Other Hangoverreceived by a college audience. We found that The Other Hangover in fact messaging was unclear. Most students both comprehended andresonated very well: internalized the messages. We asked students what they thought The Other Hangover represented. Agree The Other Hangover message is more Here’s what we heard: 81% relatable than other “drink responsibly” ads. “The harmful effects of drinking too much are not just physical and health-related; they can extend into your Agree situations portrayed in The Other Hangover social life and affect your reputation.” 82% ads are more believable than other “drink responsibly” messages. “It says, ‘you don’t want this to be you.’ And it’s right, I don’t. Even if it has been me as some points, I regret Said they like The Other Hangover more than 77% other “drink responsibly” campaigns. them, or didn’t even remember them and had to have my friends tell me or show me pictures. Great job Other Hangover!”As the results illustrate, students both relate to and have positive attitudestoward The Other Hangover messages. Our messaging flourished in an “The main message is that drinking too much canenvironment typically hostile toward any anti-binge drinking messages. lead to embarrassing situations that you will regret inHigh acceptance of The Other Hangover messages shows students are the morning. Everyone, that I know, has had morningswilling to listen to what the campaign has to say. with ‘the other hangover’ and no one enjoys it.This is a campaign that is bringing that message to the surfaceBased on these findings, we feel we have achieved a necessary first step in rather than ‘don’t drink!’ campaigns.”changing attitudes and behaviors related to overconsumption. 57
  • 60. Demographic Analysis A series of statistical analyses were completed to determine if certain demographic characteristics affect attitudes toward The Other Hangover message. Lifestyle variables were also analyzed to examine if affiliations with certain communities influence attitudinal ratings. The three items (relatable, believable, liking) were combined to form an overall scale of attitude toward the message (Cronbach α = .905). Males and females differed in overall ratings of the message strategy; females rated the messages slightly higher than males (Mean = 16.8 vs. 15.6) (t(540) = 3.742, p <.001). Binge drinkers versus non-binge drinkers had similar ratings of the messages (Mean = 16.5 vs. = 16.2) Students under 21 had similar ratings as students over the legal drinking age (Mean = 16.6 vs. 16.0) Greek students had similar ratings as non-Greek students (Mean = 16.7 vs. 16.4) Athletes and sports fans had similar ratings as those not affiliated with the sports community (Mean = 16.6 vs. 16.4) A lack of evaluative differences between population segments suggests the core message strategy of The Other Hangover is well accepted across the broad campus community.58
  • 61. aTTiTude TOWard The ads Ratings by Audience TypeNext, students were asked to rate each print ad on a Demographic and lifestyle variables did interact to predict students’ ratings of4-point scale from “excellent” to “poor.” The the ads. Females rated nearly every ad slightly higher than males. Moreover, At-following shows students’ ratings of the ads, listed Risk Drinkers tended to have slightly higher evaluations, though the differencesfrom the most-liked to least-liked: are not statistically significant across all ads. Percent by gender who rated the ad as “good” or “excellent”: Female Male 72.3 1 The Flasher 72.0 74.1 2 The Creep 65.0 74.4 3 The Fighter 63.1 73.6 4 The Make-out 57.0 5 The Crier 66.2 51.9 59
  • 62. “We discuss the cOnversaTiOn The Other Hangover campaign was embedded in a complex social environment, andsayings in the ads we needed to consider possible indirect effects of the campaign. Interpersonal influ-(which are quite catchy) ence will play a major role in student acceptance of the campaign. Conversations with peers will shape a student’s perception of the advertisement, making it more or lessand sometimes use them likely they accept the promoted behavior.as jokes to remind people We captured the prevalence and valence of conversations students had about Theto control how much they Other Hangover. Such conversations do have an indirect, yet meaningful influence on campaign success.drink.They are actuallyquite effective!” The Other Hangover sparked conversation. - Survey respondent 54.8% of students talked about the campaign with their friends. Who is most likely to talk about the campaign? Statistical analyses show the following characteristics influence the likelihood % Who talked about The Other of an individual discussing Hangover at least once The Other Hangover. All Students 54.8% *At-Risk Drinkers 61.8% *Difference in proportions is significant (95% CI; Z = 1.359) Non at-risk 54.9% Male 49.5% * (95% CI; Z = 1.904) *Female 57.9% “We talked “We talked *Under 21 Over 21 58.8% * (95% CI; Z = 2.394) 48.5% about how they about how the *Sports fan 63.6% * (95% CI; Z = 3.394) Non sports fan 48.9% were funny and ads made us think *Live in dorm 69.8% * (95% CI; Z = 4.286) ‘so true.’” about our own Other 49.5% behavior.” Enrolled in ACL 68.6% Insufficient sample size for ACL (n = 24) and Greek (n = 25) to Greek 59.5% draw conclusions60
  • 63. “The Other Hangover campaign has been successful in getting Importantly, students were significantly students talking. I have overheard more likely to discuss liking the campaign several conversations in class about the ads.” than disliking it (45.2% vs. 7.8%). - Survey respondent This insight should not be overlooked. A majority of students liked the ads and had positive conversations with their friends about The Other Hangover. Those who categorized conversa- tions as “about both liking and disliking the ads” and “talked about something different” were not necessarily negativeWe talked about We talked about We talked about Neither, we talked toward the campaign. liking the ads disliking the ads both liking and about something disliking the ads different To better understand the nature of conversations, we asked respondents to describe the content of the discussions they had with friends. Below we provide an example of a response found in each of the categories in the graph above. “We told stories of situations in our own lives to which the “Mostly the titles turned into a joke, e.g.: ‘Pat, before you got too1 ads directly related.We selected the phrase and ad that best 3 drunk you weren’t known as the creep!’ I was actually in a photo represented each of us when we’re completely drunk, and that’s on facebook where a girl friend and I are posing and then collected the various posters, which are now hanging imitating the poster. Among the jokes, we have admitted that it’s around our apartments.” the best campaign we’ve ever seen.” “We talked about how some of the situations in the ads are “We talked about the fact that the ads were everywhere and2 over-the-top and take it too far.” 4 my friend wanted some magnets that advertised it.” 61
  • 64. Did conversation-type differ by population groups? We talked about liking the ads A variety of variables were analyzed to determine if certain population 60% segments tended to discuss either positive or negative feelings about the campaign. At-Risk Drinkers and females were most likely to chat with 50% 52.5% their peers about liking the campaign. 49.6% 40% No statistical differences were found across groups in prevalence of conversations about disliking the campaign. 30% 35.8% 32.1% 20% 10% 0%“We talked about ale sk le riskhow we have seen Ma t-ri Fem At-things happen to people or tathat it has happened/almost Nohappened to one of us, that they High-risk drinkers compared to non-high-risk (CI 95%; Z =aren’t the typical ‘don’t drink, period’ 2.356) and females compared to males (CI 95%; Z = 2.222)campaigns — that whoever made were more likely to chat with peers about liking the campaign.them isn’t stupid, they know what kidsdo, but they are giving us a BETTERmessage than just don’t do it — theyare telling us to be smart, and they are Conversation: Conclusionshowing us things that easily happen Analyses indicate The Other Hangover messages were not only noticed, but attracted enoughif you don’t. Yea, drinking and driving attention for students to discuss it with peers. While a majority of those conversations wereis bad, but most of us aren’t driv- positive toward the campaign, for many students, discussion was more complex than simpleing anywhere after our parties liking or disliking of the ads. Students integrated the messaging into their daily lives.on campus. These just applybetter.” Importantly, At-Risk Drinkers were more likely than any other demographic segment to discuss liking the ads with their peers. This shows that — unlike previous anti-binge drinking efforts- Survey respondent — our ads truly resonated with the audience most at-risk for over-consumption. Moreover, the prevalence and type of conversation surrounding The Other Hangover suggests this message strategy has the potential to change attitudes and shift drinking behaviors over time.62
  • 65. aTTiTude TOWard binge drinKingOur analysis of the evaluation survey data shows that The Other What is more certain is that the process of successfully alteringHangover was effective in gaining attention and conveying the key student attitudes toward binge drinking is likely to take placemessages intended by the campaign — both important initial steps slowly, over time — and is most likely to emerge over the coursenecessary in changing student attitudes and behaviors. of a number of years.The Other Hangover successfully broke through the day-to-day Advertising campaigns such as The Other Hangover are likely tomedia clutter of a campus environment, and was generally well- play an important, but still only partial role, and must be imple-liked and well-remembered by our target audience. mented in partnership with other alcohol education efforts geared toward shifting societal-level attitudes about binge-drinking.While the ultimate goal of any campaign such as The OtherHangover is to change behavior and reduce the overall prevalence Two comments from our student respondents exemplify this point:of binge drinking, altering student attitudes about the risks andnegative aspects of over-consumption must come first. Academic “Overall, I think that the situations were highly relatable,literature shows personal attitudes are generally stable and often which is a great start, but ultimately that’s not enoughhighly resistant to change. to deter binge drinking.”We did attempt to measure student attitudes toward binge drinking “One of my friend’s facebook statuses was ‘could havewithin our evaluation, using multiple surveys over the course of the been an ad for the other hangover last night...’ this justcampaign, and our data did not show any statistically significant goes to show that, while people paid attention to it andpopulation level shift in student attitudes toward binge drinking thought it was funny, they still drank.”throughout the semester.It could be argued that achieving measurable change in student Our initial evaluation of The Other Hangover shows the campaignattitudes within such a relatively short amount of time is a generally resonates with college students, an achievement we consider aunrealistic goal. Alternately it may be possible that our campaign success.was successful in positively altering some student attitudes, whilehaving little to no influence on other individuals — thus making If The Other Hangover campaign is able to continue on thethe particular impact of our campaign difficult to detect using University of Minnesota campus, data from this initial evaluationaggregate level survey data. will allow for an ongoing comparison of student attitudes and self- reported binge-drinking behaviors over the course of several years. 63
  • 66. NEXT STEPS As part of this report, the Century Council requested Boynton Health Service is uniquely positioned to bring recommendations on how The Other Hangover might The Other Hangover to other college and university be continued or expanded. campuses. Boynton Health Service is regarded as a leader in college health, both locally and nationally. The University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus has a strong interest in continuing the project. The Other Over the past fifteen years, Boynton has partnered with Hangover is regarded highly by staff at University of colleges and universities across the state of Minnesota Minnesota’s Boynton Health Service, a unit with the to administer the annual College Student Health Sur- Office for Student Affairs, and others at the University, vey, offer smoking cessation programs such as Quit and including representatives of the University of Minne- Win, and implement smoke-free policies. sota Police, University Relations, as well as members of the local community. Boynton Health Service also maintains the Healthy Campus Network website, which brings private and Discussions with University public postsecondary institutions together to share administration have determined information. Boynton Health Service collaborates with the Public Health and Commu- approximately twenty colleges and universities in Min- nications department at Boynton nesota each year, providing public health and commu- Health Service would be the most nications assistance as needed. appropriate group to manage con- tinuation of The Other Hangover.64
  • 67. OpTiOn a: $95,000 OpTiOn b: $65,000An additional grant amount of $95,000 would allow Boynton Health Service to An additional grant amount of $65,000 would allow1) continue The Other Hangover on the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Boynton Health Service to 1) continue The Other Hangover campus, 2) expand the campaign to a sample of other Minnesota colleges and on the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus and 2)universities (perhaps within the University of Minnesota system, the Minnesota expand the campaign to a sample of other MinnesotaState Colleges and Universities system, or to Minnesota private colleges and colleges and universities (perhaps within the University ofuniversities), and 3) expand the campaign to one additional Big Ten institution. Minnesota system, the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system, or to Minnesota private colleges and University of Minnesota,Twin Cities campus universities). (See 1 and 2) 1 Based on survey data, we recommend continued advertising on bus shelters and billboards around campus, extending campaign advertising in The Minnesota Daily student newspaper, and a continued paid online advertising presence targeting University of Minnesota undergraduates OpTiOn c: $50,000 on Facebook. These advertising methods appear to have most effectively Modifying the 2010 pilot garnered student attention and conveyed the campaign’s key messages. An additional grant of $50,000 would allow Boynton Health Service to continue The Other Hangover on the University Other Minnesota colleges and universities of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus. (See 1 above) 2 Many colleges and universities do not have the staff or experience necessary to coordinate media buys, place ads on a large scale, or Approximately $50,000 would be used to cover media costs and staff costs for management of the project on the provide camera-ready design work. Boynton Health Service has University of Minnesota - Twin Cities campus. experience working with other colleges and universities to facilitate this type of campaign. A portion of the funds could go toward further Based on the response of The Century Council, a more development of a campaign website where other schools could access detailed plan, budget and evaluation will be developed. and download campaign materials. The cost of media buys at other campuses and staff time will need to be determined before we know how much the budget would cover. One additional Big Ten institution 3 Student government leaders at the University of Nebraska, a Big Ten institution, have expressed interest in The Other Hangover campaign. The cost of media buys at this campus and staff time will need to be determined before we know how much the budget would cover. 65
  • 68. 2010 launch Team 2009 nsac Team Advisors Advisor Nathan Gilkerson Howard Liszt Michelle Gross Presidents Rachel Armstrong Erin Lamberty Lauren Fink Jeanine Lilke Hope Horstmann Danielle Ouellette Daniel Lans Laura Rask Jake Achterhoff Fiona Severson Stephanie Bakkum Zach Stern Rochelle Berentson James Wakely Brian Bernier Kellie Coit special ThanKs TO Alex DeNuccio Mary Achartz Alyssa Diamond Andrea Ahneman Jessi Eikos Deborah Diamond Sarah Eslyn Scott Dierks Abby Faust Dana Farley Susan Garcia (Leader) Greg Gerlach Michelle Gross Dave Golden Jim Hagen Julie Golias Tanner Hall Laura Johnson Meredith Harper Mary Ann Keddie Hillary Heinz Jean Kucera Becky Hirn Jerry Rinehart Alicia Houselog (Leader) Wally Swanson Robyn Kennedy Brian Southwell Olga Lobasenko Al Tims Corinne Long Amelious Whyte Russell Mantione Joe Mischo Christina Newman Shaina Novotny Sarah Poluha Alex Regner Lauren Sudbrink (Leader)66

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