Photo by Alice Henneman1
Alice Henneman, MS, RD (ahenneman1@unl.edu)Extension Educator–NutritionUniversity of Nebraska–Lincoln ExtensionJoanne Kins...
Fresh herbs transform―ordinary‖ into ―extraordinary‖3ChivesPhoto by Alice Henneman
Egg salad sandwichChives 4Photo by Alice Henneman
Carrot soupChives5Photo by Alice Henneman
Herbs add a ―pop‖ of …6Photo by Alice Henneman
Color … and …Mint7Photo by Alice Henneman
Photo by Alice HennemanFlavor!Chive―flowerettes‖on spinach8
In early Rome,young suitorswore a sprigof basil tosignal theirmaritalintentions.Source: American Spice TradeAssociation9Ph...
10
Photo by Alice HennemanIn Great Britain,the ―h‖ ispronounced; in theUnited States, it ispronounced ―erb‖11
12
Photo by Alice HennemanFlavor foods when cuttingback on salt, fat, and sugar13
Extra calories add up14
Herbs (both freshand dried) mayprovideantioxidants thathelp protectagainst diseasessuch as cancerand heart disease15
Growing herbs adds pleasure when theygreet you with wonderful scents!Adapted from ‘Herb garden’ by Bianca Nogrady availabl...
―I plant rosemary allover the garden, sopleasant is it to knowthat at every few stepsone may draw thekindly branchletsthro...
18
Annuals―Annual‖ herbs must beplanted yearly. Some may beperennials in some states orcan be raised indoorsthroughout the ye...
BASILPhoto by Alice Henneman20
DILL (prolific reseeder)21Photo by Alice Henneman
Photo by Alice HennemanPARSLEY22
CILANTROAdapted from ‘Cilantro’ by ibeamme available at http://flic.kr/p/MSGy9 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Fu...
Perennials―Perennial‖ herbs will growfrom the original planting forseveral years. Some may be―tender perennials‖ andnormal...
ROSEMARY(tender perennial in some states)Photo by Alice Henneman25
OREGANO26Photo by Alice Henneman
MINTPhoto by Alice Henneman27
Photo by Alice HennemanTARRAGON28
THYMEPhoto by Alice Henneman29
SAGEPhoto by Alice Henneman30
?What herb(s)would/do YOUlike to plant?31
32
Herbs are easy to grow!Photo by Alice Henneman33
Some even thrive on neglect!Photo by Alice Henneman34
Both annual and perennial herbs canbe grown indoors for winter harvest35Adapted from ‘Windowsill herb garden’ by eskay8 av...
Need at least 6 hours of sun daily36Photo by Alice Henneman
Check labelsto be sureyou chooseherbs meantfor culinaryuses for thebest flavorPhoto by Alice Henneman37
Farmers Markets can be a sourceof herbs grown in your statePhoto by Alice Henneman38
Photo by Alice HennemanAdd color by combining with flowersof similar water, sun and soil needs39
Plant herbsoutdoors afterthe last day offrost in thespring to avoidlosing plants toa late freeze.Chives are acold-tolerant...
Short on space? Plant in potsAdapted from ‘2008 herb crop on the patio’ by Thomas Pix available at http://flic.kr/p/4BnT1u...
When planting mintin the ground:• Control by planting in acontainer at least 12‖wide without drainageholes• Bury the conta...
43
Photo by Alice HennemanPicking in the morning is best after thedew has dried but before sun gets hot44
• Herbs have their bestflavor if picked beforeflower heads developor open.• Especially importantfor annual herbs.Seed prod...
Fresh herbs canbe stored in anopen or aperforatedplastic bag inyour refrigeratorcrisper drawerfor a few days46
Making your own perforated bags―You can make holes using a standardpaper punch or a sharp object such as apen, pencil, or ...
Wash herbs under runningwater just before usingPhoto by Alice Henneman48
Dry in a salad spinner or gentlypat dry with a paper towelPhoto by Alice Henneman49
Chives:• Quickly snipsmall bundles ofchives with akitchen scissorsOR …• Cut bundles on acutting boardwith a very sharpchef...
Photo by Alice HennemanCilantro, parsley,and othersmall-leaveddelicate herbs:• Remove leavesby hand• It‘s OK to includesom...
Thyme, oregano,rosemary, tarragonand other sturdystemmed,small-leafed herbs:• Hold thumb andindex fingertogether; run down...
Chopping herbleaves intosmaller amounts:• Bunch leaves oncutting board• Use a sharp chef‘sknife so as not tobruise the lea...
Place fingertips on tip of a chef‘s knife and rockblade briefly back and forth. Re-gather leavesand chop again if a smalle...
Basil, mint, sageand other large,leafy herbs:• A technique called―chiffonade‖ canbe used with theseherbs• This method cuts...
Stack 5 or 6 leaves, and roll tightlyPhoto by Alice Henneman56
Cut crosswise into narrow ribbonsPhoto by Alice Henneman57
A generalguidelinewhen usingfresh herbs ina recipe is touse 3 timesas much as ofa dried herbDried HerbFresh Herb58
Beware: You can over do herbs!―Parsley isgharsley‖~ Ogden Nash59
Add more delicate herbsa minute or two beforethe end of cooking orsprinkle on food justbefore served.60
Delicate herbsinclude:• Basil• Chives• Cilantro• Dill leaves• Mint• Parsley61Photo by Alice Henneman
―Delicate‖ herbsmay lose moreof their flavorwhen driedSource: Cook‘s Illustrated,www.cooksillustrated.com/howto/print/deta...
This pizza wouldn‘t be thesame with dried basil!Photo by Alice Henneman63
Less delicate herbs canbe added about the last20 minutes of cooking.64
Less delicateherbs include:• Oregano• Rosemary• Sage• Thyme65Photo by Alice Henneman
?What herb(s) doYOU currently use?66
67
Rosemary• Chicken• Fish• Lamb• Pork• Roasted potatoes• Soups• Stews• Tomatoes68Photo by Alice Henneman
Basil• A natural snippedin with tomatoes• Terrific in freshpesto• Otherpossibilitiesinclude pastasauce, peas,zucchini69Pho...
Dill• Carrots• Cottage cheese• Fish• Green beans• Potatoes• Tomatoes70Photo by Alice Henneman
Parsley• The curly leaf is themost common, but theflat-leaf or Italianparsley is morestrongly flavored andoften preferred ...
Cilantro• Mexican, Asianand Caribbeancooking• Salsas• Tomatoes72Adapted from ‘Cilantro’ by ibeamme available athttp://flic...
Oregano• Peppers• Tomatoes73Photo by Alice Henneman
Mint• Carrots• Fruit salads• Parsley• Peas• Tabbouleh• Tea74Photo by Alice Henneman
Tarragon• Chicken• Eggs• Fish• Green beans75Photo by Alice Henneman
Thyme• Eggs• Lima beans• Potatoes• Poultry• Summer squash• Tomatoes76Photo by Alice Henneman
Sage• Beef• Chicken• Potatoes• Pork• Carrots• Summer squash77Photo by Alice Henneman
?What herb(s)combination(s)might YOU try?78
79
Start by searching cookbooks or theInternet for these classic recipe ideas80
Tabbouleh (with mint and parsley)Photo by Alice Henneman81
Tomato basil bruschettaPhoto by Alice Henneman82
Pesto (basil is usually main herb)Adapted from ‘Soup and Sandwich 6of12 BBL600XL’ by Food thinkers available at http://fli...
Rosemary roasted potatoesAdapted from ‘Rosemary Roasted Potatoes’ by Laurel Fan available at http://flic.kr/p/5L5A2s under...
Stuffing (sage and thyme often main herbs)Adapted from ‘Sage & Sausage Stuffing’ by Lauren Teague available at http://flic...
Salmon with dill sauceAdapted from ‘Salmon with dill sauce’ by William Selman available at http://flic.kr/p/3bmziF under a...
Salsa (cilantro often a key ingredient)87Adapted from ‘Fresh tomato salsa’ by Keith McDuffee available at http://flic.kr/p...
Tarragon (a classic egg dish ingredient)Adapted from ‘red, white & booze!’ by Marynificent Bradley available at http://fli...
Oregano (often used in Italian cuisine)Adapted from ‘food_italian_tomato_bolognese_2_recipe’by time anchor available at ht...
?What is YOURfavorite recipeusing herbs?90
91
Add edible herbgarnishes (plusflavor / nutrients) to:• Soups• Salads• Vegetables• Desserts• Beverages• Protein dishes• Fru...
Garnishes can take many forms93FlowersSprigsLeaves ChoppedChiffonadePhotos by Alice Henneman
Basil (leaf)Photo by Alice Henneman94
Basil (chiffonade)Photo by Alice Henneman95
Chives (chopped)Photo by Alice Henneman96
Chives (sprigs)Adapted from ‘Untitled’ by Mike Carroll available at http://flic.kr/p/6N1JWk under a Creative Commons Attri...
Adapted from ‘Springtime in a Bowl’ by Alana available at http://flic.kr/p/6pZL17 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0...
Chives (flowerettes)Photo by Alice Henneman99
Adapted from ‘Corn Chowder from the Best of Bridge’ by Pastilla the Mannequin aka trupastilla available at http://flic.kr/...
Cilantro (leaf)Adapted from ‘Beanie Cheesie’ by Joshua Heller available at http://flic.kr/p/83fksn under a Creative Common...
Dill (chopped)Adapted from ‘Summer Food’ by Ted Major available at http://flic.kr/p/6u6EaB under a Creative Commons Attrib...
Dill (small, tender sprig)Adapted from ‘One Pot Chicken and Penne Stew with Dill’ by Alpha aka avlxyz available at http://...
Dill (edible flowers)104Adapted from ‘Măche and Mixed Greens Salad with Kohlrabi, Cucumber, Dill Flowers, and Ciabatta Cro...
Mint (with tea)105Adapted from ‘202-365’ by F Delventhal available at http://flic.kr/p/8kEc6L under a Creative Commons Att...
Mint (in smoothie)Adapted from ‘Smoothie and Toast’ by bricolage 108 available at http://flic.kr/p/PUiqq under a Creative ...
Mint (with fruit)Adapted from ‘Fruit Cup’ by yugoQ available at http://flic.kr/p/kLGFR under a Creative Commons Attributio...
Adapted from ‘Gelato!’ by Juan Carlos Madrigal available at http://flic.kr/p/6yy7tzunder a Creative Commons Attribution; 3...
Photo by Alice HennemanParsley (chopped)109
Parsley (leaves of flat-leafed parsley)110Adapted from ‘Summer Quinoa Salad (Vegan)’’by Jennifer aka SweetOnVeg available ...
Parsley (sprigs of curly parsley)Adapted from ‘Pasta Arrabbiatta with chicken, garnished with fresh parsley and parmigiano...
Thyme (individual tiny leaves)Photo by Alice Henneman112
Thyme (young thyme with tender, edible stems)Adapted from ‘Stracci with roasted butternut squash, mozzarella and thyme’ ’b...
?What is a newherb garnish ideaYOU might try?114
115
Opinions vary on the bestway to preserve herbs116
Experiment with a small amount;decide which method you prefer.Here are 2 popular methods …117
Drying herbs:Dehydrator drying is afast and easy way todry high quality herbsbecause temperatureand air circulation canbe ...
Freezing herbs inoil or water :• Works best poppeddirectly into cooked foods• Chop or use sprigs/leaves• Place in ice cube...
• Cover tray lightlywith plastic wrap;freeze overnight• Label freezer bagswith herb type/date;then add herbs• Some feel th...
121
Sage and coneflowers122Photo by Alice Henneman
More herb bouquets(parsley, dill, sage, lavender, thyme, mint)123
Tiny individual bouquets(tarragon combined with flowersin a shot glass)124
?What idea willyou try first withfresh herbs?125
126Photo by Alice Henneman
For more information about herbs:1. Cooking with Fresh Herbs,http://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/fresh-herbs2. Colorful Foods Vide...
Photo by Alice Henneman128
Nebraska–Lincoln Extension educational programsabide with the nondiscrimination policies of theUniversity of Nebraska–Linc...
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Healthy Cooking with Fresh Herbs

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Change the taste and appearance of your foods from "ordinary to "extraordinary" by adding fresh herbs. Download a related handout from Slideshare at http://www.slideshare.net/alicehenneman/cooking-with-fresh-herbs

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Healthy Cooking with Fresh Herbs

  1. 1. Photo by Alice Henneman1
  2. 2. Alice Henneman, MS, RD (ahenneman1@unl.edu)Extension Educator–NutritionUniversity of Nebraska–Lincoln ExtensionJoanne Kinsey, MS (jkinsey@njaes.rutgers.edu)Rutgers Cooperative ExtensionFamily & Community Health Sciences EducatorSarah Browning, MS (sbrowning1@unl.edu)Extension Educator–HorticultureUniversity of Nebraska–Lincoln ExtensionDownload this PowerPoint (free) athttp://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/fresh-herbs-powerpointThis is a peer-reviewed publication2
  3. 3. Fresh herbs transform―ordinary‖ into ―extraordinary‖3ChivesPhoto by Alice Henneman
  4. 4. Egg salad sandwichChives 4Photo by Alice Henneman
  5. 5. Carrot soupChives5Photo by Alice Henneman
  6. 6. Herbs add a ―pop‖ of …6Photo by Alice Henneman
  7. 7. Color … and …Mint7Photo by Alice Henneman
  8. 8. Photo by Alice HennemanFlavor!Chive―flowerettes‖on spinach8
  9. 9. In early Rome,young suitorswore a sprigof basil tosignal theirmaritalintentions.Source: American Spice TradeAssociation9Photo by Alice Henneman
  10. 10. 10
  11. 11. Photo by Alice HennemanIn Great Britain,the ―h‖ ispronounced; in theUnited States, it ispronounced ―erb‖11
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. Photo by Alice HennemanFlavor foods when cuttingback on salt, fat, and sugar13
  14. 14. Extra calories add up14
  15. 15. Herbs (both freshand dried) mayprovideantioxidants thathelp protectagainst diseasessuch as cancerand heart disease15
  16. 16. Growing herbs adds pleasure when theygreet you with wonderful scents!Adapted from ‘Herb garden’ by Bianca Nogrady available at http://flic.kr/p/5XiTLr under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/16
  17. 17. ―I plant rosemary allover the garden, sopleasant is it to knowthat at every few stepsone may draw thekindly branchletsthrough one‘s hand,and have the enjoymentof their incomparableincense …‖~ Gertrude Jekyll, British Horticulturist17Photo by Alice Henneman
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19. Annuals―Annual‖ herbs must beplanted yearly. Some may beperennials in some states orcan be raised indoorsthroughout the year.19
  20. 20. BASILPhoto by Alice Henneman20
  21. 21. DILL (prolific reseeder)21Photo by Alice Henneman
  22. 22. Photo by Alice HennemanPARSLEY22
  23. 23. CILANTROAdapted from ‘Cilantro’ by ibeamme available at http://flic.kr/p/MSGy9 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/23
  24. 24. Perennials―Perennial‖ herbs will growfrom the original planting forseveral years. Some may be―tender perennials‖ andnormally grown as annuals insome states, depending ontemperature requirements.24
  25. 25. ROSEMARY(tender perennial in some states)Photo by Alice Henneman25
  26. 26. OREGANO26Photo by Alice Henneman
  27. 27. MINTPhoto by Alice Henneman27
  28. 28. Photo by Alice HennemanTARRAGON28
  29. 29. THYMEPhoto by Alice Henneman29
  30. 30. SAGEPhoto by Alice Henneman30
  31. 31. ?What herb(s)would/do YOUlike to plant?31
  32. 32. 32
  33. 33. Herbs are easy to grow!Photo by Alice Henneman33
  34. 34. Some even thrive on neglect!Photo by Alice Henneman34
  35. 35. Both annual and perennial herbs canbe grown indoors for winter harvest35Adapted from ‘Windowsill herb garden’ by eskay8 available at http://flic.kr/p/6yLnjG under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
  36. 36. Need at least 6 hours of sun daily36Photo by Alice Henneman
  37. 37. Check labelsto be sureyou chooseherbs meantfor culinaryuses for thebest flavorPhoto by Alice Henneman37
  38. 38. Farmers Markets can be a sourceof herbs grown in your statePhoto by Alice Henneman38
  39. 39. Photo by Alice HennemanAdd color by combining with flowersof similar water, sun and soil needs39
  40. 40. Plant herbsoutdoors afterthe last day offrost in thespring to avoidlosing plants toa late freeze.Chives are acold-tolerantperennial andtolerate frost.Photo by Alice Henneman40
  41. 41. Short on space? Plant in potsAdapted from ‘2008 herb crop on the patio’ by Thomas Pix available at http://flic.kr/p/4BnT1u under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/41
  42. 42. When planting mintin the ground:• Control by planting in acontainer at least 12‖wide without drainageholes• Bury the container in theground so 1‖ of the lip isabove ground level• May need to water morefrequently than otherherbs planted in groundas roots can‘t go as deepPhoto by Alice Henneman42
  43. 43. 43
  44. 44. Photo by Alice HennemanPicking in the morning is best after thedew has dried but before sun gets hot44
  45. 45. • Herbs have their bestflavor if picked beforeflower heads developor open.• Especially importantfor annual herbs.Seed production willhasten the end of theirlife. Help herbsmaintain their flavorby pinching out anyflower heads thatbegin to develop.Photo by Alice Henneman45
  46. 46. Fresh herbs canbe stored in anopen or aperforatedplastic bag inyour refrigeratorcrisper drawerfor a few days46
  47. 47. Making your own perforated bags―You can make holes using a standardpaper punch or a sharp object such as apen, pencil, or knife. Punch holesapproximately every 6 inches throughboth sides of the bag.If using a knife to create the openings,make two cuts — in an ‗X‘ shape — foreach hole to ensure good air circulation.‖Source: University of Wisconsin Extension47
  48. 48. Wash herbs under runningwater just before usingPhoto by Alice Henneman48
  49. 49. Dry in a salad spinner or gentlypat dry with a paper towelPhoto by Alice Henneman49
  50. 50. Chives:• Quickly snipsmall bundles ofchives with akitchen scissorsOR …• Cut bundles on acutting boardwith a very sharpchef‘s knifePhoto by Alice Henneman50
  51. 51. Photo by Alice HennemanCilantro, parsley,and othersmall-leaveddelicate herbs:• Remove leavesby hand• It‘s OK to includesome tender stems51
  52. 52. Thyme, oregano,rosemary, tarragonand other sturdystemmed,small-leafed herbs:• Hold thumb andindex fingertogether; run downthe stem in theopposite directionthe leaves havegrownPhoto by Alice Henneman52
  53. 53. Chopping herbleaves intosmaller amounts:• Bunch leaves oncutting board• Use a sharp chef‘sknife so as not tobruise the leaves53Photo by Alice Henneman
  54. 54. Place fingertips on tip of a chef‘s knife and rockblade briefly back and forth. Re-gather leavesand chop again if a smaller size is desiredPhoto by Alice Henneman54
  55. 55. Basil, mint, sageand other large,leafy herbs:• A technique called―chiffonade‖ canbe used with theseherbs• This method cutsthese herbs intonarrow ribbonsPhoto by Alice Henneman55
  56. 56. Stack 5 or 6 leaves, and roll tightlyPhoto by Alice Henneman56
  57. 57. Cut crosswise into narrow ribbonsPhoto by Alice Henneman57
  58. 58. A generalguidelinewhen usingfresh herbs ina recipe is touse 3 timesas much as ofa dried herbDried HerbFresh Herb58
  59. 59. Beware: You can over do herbs!―Parsley isgharsley‖~ Ogden Nash59
  60. 60. Add more delicate herbsa minute or two beforethe end of cooking orsprinkle on food justbefore served.60
  61. 61. Delicate herbsinclude:• Basil• Chives• Cilantro• Dill leaves• Mint• Parsley61Photo by Alice Henneman
  62. 62. ―Delicate‖ herbsmay lose moreof their flavorwhen driedSource: Cook‘s Illustrated,www.cooksillustrated.com/howto/print/detail.asp?docid=97462Photo by Alice Henneman
  63. 63. This pizza wouldn‘t be thesame with dried basil!Photo by Alice Henneman63
  64. 64. Less delicate herbs canbe added about the last20 minutes of cooking.64
  65. 65. Less delicateherbs include:• Oregano• Rosemary• Sage• Thyme65Photo by Alice Henneman
  66. 66. ?What herb(s) doYOU currently use?66
  67. 67. 67
  68. 68. Rosemary• Chicken• Fish• Lamb• Pork• Roasted potatoes• Soups• Stews• Tomatoes68Photo by Alice Henneman
  69. 69. Basil• A natural snippedin with tomatoes• Terrific in freshpesto• Otherpossibilitiesinclude pastasauce, peas,zucchini69Photo by Alice Henneman
  70. 70. Dill• Carrots• Cottage cheese• Fish• Green beans• Potatoes• Tomatoes70Photo by Alice Henneman
  71. 71. Parsley• The curly leaf is themost common, but theflat-leaf or Italianparsley is morestrongly flavored andoften preferred forcooking• Naturals for parsleyinclude potato salad,tabbouleh, eggsandwiches71Photo by Alice Henneman
  72. 72. Cilantro• Mexican, Asianand Caribbeancooking• Salsas• Tomatoes72Adapted from ‘Cilantro’ by ibeamme available athttp://flic.kr/p/MSGy9 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
  73. 73. Oregano• Peppers• Tomatoes73Photo by Alice Henneman
  74. 74. Mint• Carrots• Fruit salads• Parsley• Peas• Tabbouleh• Tea74Photo by Alice Henneman
  75. 75. Tarragon• Chicken• Eggs• Fish• Green beans75Photo by Alice Henneman
  76. 76. Thyme• Eggs• Lima beans• Potatoes• Poultry• Summer squash• Tomatoes76Photo by Alice Henneman
  77. 77. Sage• Beef• Chicken• Potatoes• Pork• Carrots• Summer squash77Photo by Alice Henneman
  78. 78. ?What herb(s)combination(s)might YOU try?78
  79. 79. 79
  80. 80. Start by searching cookbooks or theInternet for these classic recipe ideas80
  81. 81. Tabbouleh (with mint and parsley)Photo by Alice Henneman81
  82. 82. Tomato basil bruschettaPhoto by Alice Henneman82
  83. 83. Pesto (basil is usually main herb)Adapted from ‘Soup and Sandwich 6of12 BBL600XL’ by Food thinkers available at http://flic.kr/p/7LxR3 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ 83
  84. 84. Rosemary roasted potatoesAdapted from ‘Rosemary Roasted Potatoes’ by Laurel Fan available at http://flic.kr/p/5L5A2s under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/84
  85. 85. Stuffing (sage and thyme often main herbs)Adapted from ‘Sage & Sausage Stuffing’ by Lauren Teague available at http://flic.kr/p/8Xg9aC under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/85
  86. 86. Salmon with dill sauceAdapted from ‘Salmon with dill sauce’ by William Selman available at http://flic.kr/p/3bmziF under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/86
  87. 87. Salsa (cilantro often a key ingredient)87Adapted from ‘Fresh tomato salsa’ by Keith McDuffee available at http://flic.kr/p/6DGEgf under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/87
  88. 88. Tarragon (a classic egg dish ingredient)Adapted from ‘red, white & booze!’ by Marynificent Bradley available at http://flic.kr/p/6BM7FG under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/88
  89. 89. Oregano (often used in Italian cuisine)Adapted from ‘food_italian_tomato_bolognese_2_recipe’by time anchor available at http://flic.kr/p/acL5UG under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/89
  90. 90. ?What is YOURfavorite recipeusing herbs?90
  91. 91. 91
  92. 92. Add edible herbgarnishes (plusflavor / nutrients) to:• Soups• Salads• Vegetables• Desserts• Beverages• Protein dishes• Fruits• Grains Adapted from ‘Garnish with parsley and serve out into plate attable’ by Jag aka Route79 available at http://flic.kr/p/4PVG3kunder a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/92
  93. 93. Garnishes can take many forms93FlowersSprigsLeaves ChoppedChiffonadePhotos by Alice Henneman
  94. 94. Basil (leaf)Photo by Alice Henneman94
  95. 95. Basil (chiffonade)Photo by Alice Henneman95
  96. 96. Chives (chopped)Photo by Alice Henneman96
  97. 97. Chives (sprigs)Adapted from ‘Untitled’ by Mike Carroll available at http://flic.kr/p/6N1JWk under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/97
  98. 98. Adapted from ‘Springtime in a Bowl’ by Alana available at http://flic.kr/p/6pZL17 under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/Chives (flowers)98
  99. 99. Chives (flowerettes)Photo by Alice Henneman99
  100. 100. Adapted from ‘Corn Chowder from the Best of Bridge’ by Pastilla the Mannequin aka trupastilla available at http://flic.kr/p/deVBpaUnder a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0. Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/Cilantro (chopped)100
  101. 101. Cilantro (leaf)Adapted from ‘Beanie Cheesie’ by Joshua Heller available at http://flic.kr/p/83fksn under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/101
  102. 102. Dill (chopped)Adapted from ‘Summer Food’ by Ted Major available at http://flic.kr/p/6u6EaB under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/102
  103. 103. Dill (small, tender sprig)Adapted from ‘One Pot Chicken and Penne Stew with Dill’ by Alpha aka avlxyz available at http://flic.kr/p/9wzs6ounder a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0. Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/103
  104. 104. Dill (edible flowers)104Adapted from ‘Măche and Mixed Greens Salad with Kohlrabi, Cucumber, Dill Flowers, and Ciabatta Croutons’ by Emilie Hardman available atunder a Creative Commons Attribution; 3.0. Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
  105. 105. Mint (with tea)105Adapted from ‘202-365’ by F Delventhal available at http://flic.kr/p/8kEc6L under a Creative Commons Attribution; 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/105
  106. 106. Mint (in smoothie)Adapted from ‘Smoothie and Toast’ by bricolage 108 available at http://flic.kr/p/PUiqq under a Creative Commons Attribution; 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ 106
  107. 107. Mint (with fruit)Adapted from ‘Fruit Cup’ by yugoQ available at http://flic.kr/p/kLGFR under a Creative Commons Attribution; 3.0.Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ 107
  108. 108. Adapted from ‘Gelato!’ by Juan Carlos Madrigal available at http://flic.kr/p/6yy7tzunder a Creative Commons Attribution; 3.0. Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/Mint (with dessert)108
  109. 109. Photo by Alice HennemanParsley (chopped)109
  110. 110. Parsley (leaves of flat-leafed parsley)110Adapted from ‘Summer Quinoa Salad (Vegan)’’by Jennifer aka SweetOnVeg available at http://flic.kr/p/cozMz3 under a Creative Commons Attribution; 3.0.(website: http://www.sweetonveg.com/) Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
  111. 111. Parsley (sprigs of curly parsley)Adapted from ‘Pasta Arrabbiatta with chicken, garnished with fresh parsley and parmigiano’ by Ville Majander available at http://flic.kr/p/8LRbcr under aCreative Commons Attribution; 3.0. Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/111
  112. 112. Thyme (individual tiny leaves)Photo by Alice Henneman112
  113. 113. Thyme (young thyme with tender, edible stems)Adapted from ‘Stracci with roasted butternut squash, mozzarella and thyme’ ’by Blue moon in her eyes available at http://flic.kr/p/9uCKW1under a Creative Commons Attribution; 3.0. Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/113
  114. 114. ?What is a newherb garnish ideaYOU might try?114
  115. 115. 115
  116. 116. Opinions vary on the bestway to preserve herbs116
  117. 117. Experiment with a small amount;decide which method you prefer.Here are 2 popular methods …117
  118. 118. Drying herbs:Dehydrator drying is afast and easy way todry high quality herbsbecause temperatureand air circulation canbe controlled.* (Followdirections that comewith your dehydrator.)*National Center for Home Food Preservationhttp://nchfp.uga.edu/how/dry/herbs.htmlAdapted from ‘Dehydrator in Motion’ by Tom Higgins available at http://flic.kr/p/5rbMYqunder a Creative Commons Attribution; 3.0. Full terms at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/118
  119. 119. Freezing herbs inoil or water :• Works best poppeddirectly into cooked foods• Chop or use sprigs/leaves• Place in ice cube traysections with amountseasily used in recipes• Cover with extra-virginolive oil or water;frozen oil turns whitishbut changes backwhen thawedPhoto by Alice Henneman119
  120. 120. • Cover tray lightlywith plastic wrap;freeze overnight• Label freezer bagswith herb type/date;then add herbs• Some feel thismethod works bestwith less tenderherbs (i.e. rosemary,sage, thyme,oregano)• Use in 3 to 6 monthsfor best qualityPhoto by Alice Henneman120
  121. 121. 121
  122. 122. Sage and coneflowers122Photo by Alice Henneman
  123. 123. More herb bouquets(parsley, dill, sage, lavender, thyme, mint)123
  124. 124. Tiny individual bouquets(tarragon combined with flowersin a shot glass)124
  125. 125. ?What idea willyou try first withfresh herbs?125
  126. 126. 126Photo by Alice Henneman
  127. 127. For more information about herbs:1. Cooking with Fresh Herbs,http://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/fresh-herbs2. Colorful Foods Videos,http://vimeo.com/user8347130/videos3. Recipe Videos,http://www.youtube.com/FCHSdepartmentRCE4. Get Moving - Get Healthy New Jersey!http://getmovinggethealthy.org5. http://pinterest.com/alicehenneman/herbs/6. Growing Herbs, Purdue University,http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/HO-28.pdf7. Growing Herbs at Home, University of MissouriExtension, http://extension.missouri.edu/p/g6470127
  128. 128. Photo by Alice Henneman128
  129. 129. Nebraska–Lincoln Extension educational programsabide with the nondiscrimination policies of theUniversity of Nebraska–Lincoln and theUnited States Department of Agriculture.Rutgers Cooperative Extension, a unit of the RutgersNew Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, is anequal opportunity program provider and employer.Reference to commercial products or trade names is madewith the understanding that no discrimination is intended ofthose not mentioned and no endorsement by University ofNebraska–Lincoln Extension is implied for those mentioned.129
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