Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Annotated bibliographies
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Annotated bibliographies

1,960

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,960
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Homework for next week Oct 2 1. Answer questions A through F with whom you plan to develop your project. 2. Bring the answers printed to the next class October 2sd 8:00 o’clock in the morning building H 5th floor. 3. It is mandatory to read about annotated bibliographies from the information givenbelowfor the next class. 4. The next assignment will be based on annotated bibliographies bring your doubts Answer these questions A. What kind of project will you do as requirement to graduate? a. Research project or classroom project. B. Mention two tentative ideas you have as possible project? C. Who will be you academic spouse to develop your project? D. What strategies do you plan to implement your project in the class? E. What is innovative about your idea? F. Have you read any articles or journals about this topics? Annotated Bibliographies A bibliography is a list of sources (books, journals, Web sites, periodicals, etc.) one has used for researching a topic. Bibliographies are sometimes called "References" or "Works Cited" depending on the style format you are using. A bibliography usually just includes the bibliographic information (i.e., the author, title, publisher, etc.). An annotation is a summary and evaluation. Therefore, an annotated bibliographyincludes a summary and evaluation of each of the sources. Depending on your project or the assignment, your annotations may do one or more of the following. Summarize: Some annotations merely summarize the source. What are the main arguments? What is the point of this book or article? What topics are covered? If someone asked what this article/book is about, what would you say? The length of your annotations will determine how detailed your summary is. Reflect: Once you've summarized and assessed a source, you need to ask how it fits into your research. Was this source helpful to you? How does it help you shape your argument? How can you use this source in your research project? Has it changed how you think about your topic?
  • 2. Why should I write an annotated bibliography? To learn about your topic: Writing an annotated bibliography is excellent preparation for a research project. Just collecting sources for a bibliography is useful, but when you have to write annotations for each source, you're forced to read each source more carefully. You begin to read more critically instead of just collecting information. At the professional level, annotated bibliographies allow you to see what has been done in the literature and where your own research or scholarship can fit. To help you formulate a thesis: Every good research paper is an argument. The purpose of research is to state and support a thesis. So a very important part of research is developing a thesis that is debatable, interesting, and current. Writing an annotated bibliography can help you gain a good perspective on what is being said about your topic. By reading and responding to a variety of sources on a topic, you'll start to see what the issues are, what people are arguing about, and you'll then be able to develop your own point of view. What is an Annotated Bibliography? An annotated bibliography is an organized list of sources (may be any variety of materials, books, documents, videos, articles, web sites, CD-ROMs, etc.) with an accompanying paragraph that describes, explains, and/or evaluates each entry in terms of quality, authority, and relevance. Organization of an Annotated Bibliography The organization of the annotated bibliography, if not prescribed by faculty instructions, may be one of various methods, including but not limited to: Alphabetical Chronological: either by date of publication or by period of subject matter (century, era, decade, event, year) By subtopic By format (articles, books, government documents, media, web pages, etc.) By language Annotations vs. Abstracts Annotations in an annotated bibliography usually perform two functions, describe the source and evaluate the source. The annotation is a concise description of a particular source, including important aspects of content not evident in the title. It enables the researcher to establish the relevance of a specific journal article, book, research report, or government document, etc. and to decide whether to consult the full text of the work. Abstracts, such as those found in various periodical databases or those accompanying scholarly journal articles are usually just descriptive summaries.
  • 3. Elements of an Annotation Information found in an annotation include: 1. author(s); William A. Smith, Professor of English at XYZ University..."; 2. purpose/scope: "...sets out to place John Turner in eighteenth century England and show the development of his philosophy in relation to contemporary social mores"; 3. audience and level of reading difficulty: "Smith addresses himself to the scholar, albeit the concluding chapters on capital punishment will be clear to any informed layman"; 4. bias or standpoint of author : "Turner gears his study more to the romantic aspects of the age than the scientific and rational developments"; 5. findings, results, and conclusions (if available); and 6. format/special features (e.g., bibliography, glossary, index, survey instruments, testing devices, etc.). Structure of an Annotation Length: Generally, annotations constitute one paragraph and are approximately 100 -150 words long, with a goal of concise and explicative annotations Person: The third person is the standard, though first person may be appropriate for certain types of annotated bibliographies. Language and Vocabulary: Use the vocabulary of the author, as much as possible, to convey the ideas and conclusions of the author. If you use a quotation excerpted from the work set it within quotation marks. Vary your sentence structure and try to avoid repetivitive vacuuous phrases in your annotations, such as, "The author states," "This article concerns," or "The purpose of this report is," as well as sentences starting with "It was suggested that," "It was found that," and "It was reported that." Format - Sentences: Whole sentences are preferable, but single descriptive words, and simple phrases or lists may be acceptable. Format - Paragraphs: Annotations should be one paragraph long. The paragraph should contain a statement of the work's major thesis, from which the rest of the sentences can develop. Return to the top Citation Format The bibliography portion of the annotated bibliography usually follows one of the standard citation formats, APA, MLA, Chicago, etc. Citation format information is available from the library's Cite a Source web page. The most complete citation resources remain in print; copies of the APA, MLA, Chicago, Turabian, ASA and ACA style guides are available at the reference desk. For more information ask a reference librarian.
  • 4. Examples of an Annotated Bibliography Entry Example 1: Broude, Norma. Impressionism: a feminist reading. New York: Rizzoli, 1991. In this publication Broude has taken full advantage of her feminist lens to scrutinize modern French science. Her text is accessible and reader-friendly and uses poststructuralism without becoming a slave to its theories. Her systematic examination of the field, particularly in "The Gendering of Art, Science, and Nature in the Nineteenth Century," reveals underlying patterns of gender discrimination inherent in traditional French philosophy, which upholds Descartes' "I think, therefore I am." Her examination of the social relations between art and science compels readers to take a harder more skeptical look at the sexual politics of postmodernism, whose theory seems to be rooted within the French Cartesian tradition. Her book should be require reading for anyone interest in art, the feminine principle, and how it is treated in a male-oriented universe. (From Feminist Art Criticism; an annotated bibliography. New York, G.K. Hall, 1993) Example 2: Dorival, Bernard. "Ukiyo-e and European Painting." pp. 27-71. In Dialogue in Art; Japan and the West. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1976. Known in France around 1860, Ukiyo-e prints had an immediate influence on the vision and the craft of painters. First, Theodore Rousseau and Millet and then Whistler, Manet, and mainly Degas were profoundly affected. Asymmetrical compositions, scenes and landscapes represented from above or below, figures shown in close-up, pale palette, flat areas of color, the replacement of Albertian perspective with the system of opposed diagonals: all these innovations were taken up by the Impressionists, particularly Monet, who learned moreover not to reduce the scene he was painting to the limits of the canvas, and absorbed a pantheistic feeling for nature contrary to traditional Western humanism. Japanese graphic art had a continuing influence on French painting from the Post- Impressionists to the Nabis and the Fauves, as well as on the work of Ensor, Munch, Klimt and others. After the Renaissance rediscovery of ancient art, nothing had so influenced European painting as Japanese prints. (From Les Fauves; a sourcebook. Westport, Greenwood Press, 1994) Adapted from: References http://lib.skidmore.edu/library/index.php/li371-annotated-bib https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/01/

×