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groovy & grails - lecture 6
 

groovy & grails - lecture 6

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Eclipse tips

Eclipse tips
Productive tip
Two thoughts on code design
Running a script standalone
test case: build all isoforms & extract proteotypic peptides

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  • today end of a cycle\nnext week: genetic algorithm\nthen web programming\nend of the year exam: bring in your ideas\nplay customer + coder\ncustomer phase with me, then iterative development.\n
  • parsing command line arguments, packaging a project into a library\nIn practice, we will often use web application for end usage\n\n
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  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • Agile: refactor your code show you do not fear it! think of how to deal with a wild animal\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • "You ain't gonna need it" (or YAGNI for short) is the principle in extreme programming that programmers should not add functionality until it is necessary.[1] Ron Jeffries writes, "Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them."[2]\n\n
  • not only for fun...\nit is also possible to run a script/project packaging a jar and only with java\n
  • not only for fun...\nit is also possible to run a script/project packaging a jar and only with java\n
  • not only for fun...\nit is also possible to run a script/project packaging a jar and only with java\n
  • not only for fun...\nit is also possible to run a script/project packaging a jar and only with java\n
  • not only for fun...\nit is also possible to run a script/project packaging a jar and only with java\n
  • in real life, you don’t edit a script, save and rerun\nan option is to parse argument from a property file\n
  • in real life, you don’t edit a script, save and rerun\nan option is to parse argument from a property file\n
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  • classes code for action, for re-use, test etc....\n
  • classes code for action, for re-use, test etc....\n
  • classes code for action, for re-use, test etc....\n
  • classes code for action, for re-use, test etc....\n
  • classes code for action, for re-use, test etc....\n
  • can also contains source code (more voluminous but easier for third parties to debug), javadoc...\n
  • can also contains source code (more voluminous but easier for third parties to debug), javadoc...\n
  • can also contains source code (more voluminous but easier for third parties to debug), javadoc...\n
  • can also contains source code (more voluminous but easier for third parties to debug), javadoc...\n
  • can also contains source code (more voluminous but easier for third parties to debug), javadoc...\n
  • in fact, ant can be used for countless tasks, as soon as you needed for automated, dependency oriented process\nan ant file can contained multiple targets (as possibly a default one)\n
  • in fact, ant can be used for countless tasks, as soon as you needed for automated, dependency oriented process\nan ant file can contained multiple targets (as possibly a default one)\n
  • in fact, ant can be used for countless tasks, as soon as you needed for automated, dependency oriented process\nan ant file can contained multiple targets (as possibly a default one)\n
  • in fact, ant can be used for countless tasks, as soon as you needed for automated, dependency oriented process\nan ant file can contained multiple targets (as possibly a default one)\n
  • in fact, ant can be used for countless tasks, as soon as you needed for automated, dependency oriented process\nan ant file can contained multiple targets (as possibly a default one)\n
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  • first questions : you build be some example to validate the program\n
  • first questions : you build be some example to validate the program\n
  • first questions : you build be some example to validate the program\n
  • first questions : you build be some example to validate the program\n

groovy & grails - lecture 6 groovy & grails - lecture 6 Presentation Transcript