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French Scrum User Group @Google - The Agile and Open Source Way

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Support de la présentation donnée lors de la soirée du French Scrum User Group @Google le 4 novembre 2013.

Support de la présentation donnée lors de la soirée du French Scrum User Group @Google le 4 novembre 2013.

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  • 1. The Agile and Open Source Way
  • 2. merci à nos sponsors !
  • 3. Agile?
  • 4. Agile • Continuous improvement • Individuals and interactions • Working software • Customer collaboration • Responding to change Agile manifesto: http://agilemanifesto.org
  • 5. Open Source?
  • 6. Open Source • source code is published • made available to the public • enabling anyone to copy, modify and redistribute the source code without paying royalties or fees http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_source
  • 7.
  • 8. =
  • 9. ?
  • 10. Who?
  • 11. Alexis Monville #AOSWay @alexismonville !
  • 12. Alexis Monville #AOSWay @alexismonville @ayeba
  • 13. Alexis Monville #AOSWay @alexismonville @ayeba @enovance
  • 14. #frenchsug #AOSWay @alexismonville @ayeba @enovance
  • 15. merci à nos sponsors !
  • 16. Open Source = Agile ?
  • 17. Open Source = Agile ? • Open Source shares the same values: • Individuals and interactions • Working software • Customer collaboration • Responding to change
  • 18. Principles behind... • Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. • Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. • Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a 
 preference to the shorter timescale. • Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. • Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. • The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-toface conversation. • Working software is the primary measure of progress. • Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. • Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. • The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. • At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior
  • 19. Yes! • Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. • Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. • Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. • Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. • Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. • The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-toface conversation. • Working software is the primary measure of progress. • Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. • Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. • The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. • At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior
  • 20. But... • Not the same principles and practices: • No day to day face to face conversation • No collocated teams • Individuals and several teams • Distributed • Business People, Customer...
  • 21. mix
  • 22. Agile and Open Source
  • 23. Virtual Gemba Walk
  • 24. The OpenStack Open Source Cloud Mission: to produce the ubiquitous Open Source Cloud Computing platform that will meet the needs of public and private clouds regardless of size, by being simple to implement and massively scalable.
  • 25. Computing Networking Storing
  • 26. Cloud Operating System http://www.openstack.org
  • 27. Who? http://www.openstack.org/foundation/companies/
  • 28. Who? http://www.openstack.org/foundation/companies/
  • 29. and a lot more...
  • 30. 12120+ people 130 Countries
  • 31. http://www.stackalytics.com/
  • 32. What Does Openness Mean?
  • 33. Scale
  • 34. Onboarding
  • 35. Onboarding • How to... • Ask... • Wiki... • IRC, mailing list... • Buddy... • ...
  • 36. How? https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/How_To_Contribute
  • 37. Communication https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/IRC
  • 38. Release
  • 39. Release Cycle
  • 40. Release Cycle
  • 41. Release Cycle • A coordinated 6-month release cycle with frequent development milestones. • The Release Cycle is made of four major stages: • Planning • Implementation • Pre-Release • Release https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/ReleaseCycle
  • 42. Free?
  • 43. Release Cycle • Note: Each core project is free to choose a different release cycle contents, as long as they submit a version for the common OpenStack release at the end of the cycle. However, unless they have a good reason to differ, they are strongly encouraged to follow the common plan that is described in this document.
  • 44. Agile?
  • 45. Release Cycle • Note: Nothing prevents you to do a particular task outside of the designated stages.You can design during the QA stage. You can write new code on release week. The release cycle just gives you a general idea of what's the general team focus, it is not meant to restrict you in any way.
  • 46. Austin
  • 47. Bexar
  • 48. Cactus
  • 49. Diablo
  • 50. Essex
  • 51. Folsom
  • 52. Grizzly
  • 53. Havana
  • 54. Icehouse
  • 55. Release Cycle Openstack
 Design
 Summit Openstack
 Design
 Summit F G planning RC G-1 G-2 G-3 6 mois H planning RC H-1 H-2 H-3 6 mois https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Releases
  • 56. Planning
  • 57. Planning • 4 weeks to: • Design • Discuss • Target https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/ReleaseCycle
  • 58. Tenets https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/BasicDesignTenets
  • 59. Blueprints https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Blueprints
  • 60. Blueprints https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ceilometer/+spec/api-v2-improvement
  • 61. Bugs https://bugs.launchpad.net/ceilometer
  • 62. PTLs • Project Technical Leads. • A PTL is the elected technical leader of a given OpenStack core project. • At the end of the planning stage the PTLs triage the submitted blueprints and sets Priority for them. • The blueprints with a priority above Low will be tracked by Release Management throughout the cycle. https://wiki.openstack.org/wiki/Governance/TechnicalCommittee
  • 63. OpenStack Summit April 2013 - Portland, Oregon. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution - ShareAlike - photographer Aaron Hockley - hockleyphoto.com
  • 64. OpenStack Summit April 2013 - Portland, Oregon. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution - ShareAlike - photographer Aaron Hockley - hockleyphoto.com
  • 65. OpenStack Summit April 2013 - Portland, Oregon. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution - ShareAlike - photographer Aaron Hockley - hockleyphoto.com
  • 66. Summit • Every 6 months the Design Summit gather users and developers • The Summit closes the Planning phase http://www.openstack.org/summit/portland-2013/session-videos/
  • 67. Quality
  • 68. Implementation
  • 69. 800+
  • 70. 2 +1, 0 -1
  • 71. Core Devs • You need a +1 from a Core Developer • Core Developers are co-opted among the contributors
  • 72. • Teams are distributed between Paris and Montreal Offices, plus people working remotely from home (somewhere...) • They used the Openstack collaborative tools (launchpad, wiki, mailing lists, irc channels...) • Openstack continuous integration tools : Gerrit, Jenkins, Zuul...
  • 73. Questions?
  • 74. Thank you!
  • 75. Alexis Monville #AOSWay @alexismonville ! stay tuned: 
 http://www.the-agile-and-open-source-way.com/

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