Presentatie Raad van Europa 2009

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This presentatie was held in Zwolle. Pupose was to inform a delegation of the Council of Europ about de Dutch Riskmap in international (and future) perspective.

This presentatie was held in Zwolle. Pupose was to inform a delegation of the Council of Europ about de Dutch Riskmap in international (and future) perspective.

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  • The risk map is an interactive communications tool that provides information over the Internet about the nature and extent of risks in the surrounding area (neighbourhood, district, municipality, province). A risk map is a powerful aid to information and communications about risks and, as such, plays a part in the process of creating public awareness about safety (or lack thereof) in the surrounding area. It can therefore indirectly affect how safe people feel and how the surrounding area is designed. Risk maps show what potential sources of risk are present in a specific area. They also provide information about the layout of the area. As a result, a risk map can reinforce the process of promoting the awareness of the public and organisations about safety in the surrounding area. Risk maps are also an important tool for governments and services that work on risk management and spatial planning. For example, the risk map can offer information that is helpful in issuing permits and in enforcement procedures The Model Risk Map (MRM) offers a design standard for the contents and format of risk maps, making them comparable and in keeping with each other. The data thus presented becomes unambiguous and the information can be exchanged without difficulty. Existing risk maps will be adapted to the model. All parties consider it important that risk maps look the same, that symbols have an unambiguous meaning and that informative texts are identically worded.
  • Risk maps are data systems that aim to present risks on a basic map and provide supplementary information. In addition to the risks of hazardous substances, this also includes the risks of such as flooding and natural fires. Special risk cases - vulnerable objects such as hospitals and schools - are also marked on risk maps. The Leidraad Maatramp or Standard Disaster Handbook distinguishes a total of 18 types of disaster in the preparation for disaster control. It would be useful to include the sources of the risks on a map for 13 of these 18 disaster types. Disaster types such as epidemics and public utility outages cannot be predicted geographically. Three of the 13 disaster types on the risk map concern hazardous substances: flammable/explosive, toxic and nuclear materials. Information about organisations involved in such matters and transport routes is compiled in a national database: the Register of Risk Situations for Hazardous Substances or RRGS, which is maintained by the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM). The provinces maintain a joint database for the other 10 types of disasters. Both databases are used as sources for the production of risk maps. The data files ‘behind’ the risk map offer many options for professional use, e.g. by government services.
  • The risk map plays a part in the first 3 links of the safety chain. Pro-action : In the context of pro-action, the risk map can help to prevent high-risk activities from being located near (too many) vulnerable objects and of course vice versa. The risk map is relevant in spatial planning, in planning transport infrastructure, in issuing environmental permits, etc. Prevention : In preventative activities, the risk map is an aid in formulating, defining and enforcing regulations, particularly if risk sources and vulnerable objects are in close proximity to each other. Preparation : The risk map is an important aid in preparing (planning) emergency aid and disaster control, e.g. in assessing the need for emergency aid and drawing up plans of attack and disaster control plans. The risk map plays a limited part in the repression and follow-up phases, since the current situation is important at that time and organisations need to respond to the actual circumstances.
  • Based on recommendations made by the Oosting Committee (investigating the Fireworks Disaster, Enschede, 2000) and various inspectorates, the cabinet formulated a number of action points regarding the risk map and the RRGS: action point 17 results in the recording of data about risk situations with hazardous substances (Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment: Environmental Management Act and the draft1) RRGS Decree, which is a detailed elaboration of the RRGS register); pursuant to action point 35, municipalities are required to draw up a risk inventory (Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations: the Disasters and Serious Accidents Act (WRZO) and the draft1) Quality Improvement Disaster Control Act (WKR); action point 36 allows a Model Risk Map for municipalities (Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations); action point 37 encourages municipalities to inform citizens of the risks. To this end, the Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations and the Association of Dutch Municipalities (VNG) have put together a handout on risk communications. The importance of risk analysis and risk communication has already been embedded in the Disasters and Serious Accidents Act, the Risks (Serious Accidents) Decree (BRZO) - the Dutch implementation of Seveso 2 - and the updated Public Works and Water Management legislation. This is supported by the RRGS Decree1) and the Quality Improvement Disaster Control Act (WKR)1), which directly provide the framework for the Model Risk Map and for the role of provinces as producers of provincial risk maps. This legislation also ensures delivery by the relevant authority of data entered into the risk map.
  • Aussöhnung mit Deutschland und Benelux CvdK Overijssel Koordinaten für Deutschland Fragen Kulturelle Unterschiede in Bezug auf Publizität Definition Unterschiede Technologie Security - Sicherheit Nr. grenzüberschreitende Risiko NRW und NDS-Vereinbarung mit Daten über X-GDI

Transcript

  • 1. 2 september 2009 Alexander Bouwman
  • 2.
    • Context
    • About the risk map in the Netherlands
    • International coöperation
    • Future developments … and beyond
    Program
  • 3.  
  • 4. European perspective
    • Summary Helsinki convention (1992): Protect humans and the environment against industrial accidents capable of causing transboundary effects and promoting active international cooperation
    • Summary SEVESO II Directive (1986) Prevention of major accidents involving dangerous substances and limiting their consequences for man and environment, so throughout the Community to ensure high levels of protection.
    • Summary INSPIRE directive (2007): A directive of the European Parliament and the Council aiming to assist policy-making in relation to policies and activities that may have a direct or indirect impact on the environment. INSPIRE is based on the interoperable infrastructures for spatial information that are created by the Member States.
  • 5. Helsinki convention
    • Identification of the movement of hazardous substances and (optionally) conducting consultations
    • The adoption of preventive measures and introducing the obligation for the device to show that the dangerous activity is carried out safely
    • The implementation of spatial policies aimed at minimizing the risks to the population and the environment
    • Providing information to the people (inside and outside the border) and to enable participation
    • Preparation and implementation of disaster relief and provide assistance in this field
    • Notification of accidents
    • Exchange of relevant technology
    • Monitoring state of affairs.
  • 6. SEVESO II highlights
    • Safety reports and notifications
    • Emergency plans
    • Prevention policy
    • Environmental planning
    • Control and enforcement
  • 7. INSPIRE directive key principles
    • that spatial data should be collected once and maintained at the level where this can be done most effectively ,
    • that it must be possible to combine seamlessly spatial data from different sources across the EU and share it between many users and applications,
    • that it must be possible for spatial data collected at one level of government to be shared between all the different levels of government
    • that spatial data needed for good governance should be available at conditions that are not restricting its extensive use ,
    • that it should be easy to discover which spatial data is available , to evaluate its fitness for purpose and to know which conditions apply for its use.
  • 8.
    • Context
    • About the risk map in the Netherlands
    • International coöperation
    • Future developments … and beyond
    Program
  • 9. Why risk maps
  • 10. Greetings from Holland
  • 11. Risk society - facts
    • Area appx. 41.000km 2
    • 16,5 million inhabitants
    • Over 10.000 plants:
      • 2000 petrolstations with LPG
      • 9 nucleair plants
      • 350 BRZO (=SEVESO II)
    • Over 75.000 vunerable objects
    • Over 5.000 data ‘collectors’
    • Over 15.000 visitors/month on the risk map
  • 12.  
  • 13. What is a risk map?
    • Legally embedded instrument for risk-communication (Disaster and Serious Accident Act, WRZO)
      • Where and what are the risks
      • Measures taken to prevent disasters
      • How to handle in case of a disaster
    • Information system
      • Map based on the risk database
  • 14. Aim of the risk map • Informing the public Providing information about risks in the neighbourhood • Policy-instrument Up-to-date and comprehensive risk database – Disaster control / risk management – Spatial planning – Environment
  • 15. Target groups
    • Citizens and businesses
    • Professional users (governmental institutions)
      • Municipalities and provinces
      • Emergency services (fire department, police)
      • Waterboards,
      • National government
    • Therefor 2 risk maps
    Citizens Professionals
  • 16. Disaster types on the riskmap
    • Accidents with hazardous substances
        • Flammable
        • Explosive
        • Toxic
        • Nucleair
    • Aeroplane accidents
    • Accidents on water
    • Traffic accidents on land
    • Tunnel accidents
    • Fire in large buildings
    • Collapse of large buildings
    • Panic in crowds
    • Public order disturbances
    • Flooding
    • Natural fires
  • 17. Which information ?
    • Risk-objects
      • Risk (risk sources)
        • Hazardous substances
          • Organisations
          • Transport routes
        • Other risks / disaster types
      • Vulnerable objects
      • (risk receivers)
      • General – Specific per type - Geolocation
    • Background information to professionals
      • Permits, enforcement reports, (aerial)pictures
  • 18. Information providers ISOR Data Municipalities Provinces Nat. government municipalities provinces Environmental management Act and RRGS decree Disaster and Serious Accident Act (WRZO) provinces Police, safetyregion, waterboard RRGS Data
  • 19. The law and the risk map
    • WRZO (Disaster and Serious Accidents Act)
    • Environmental Management Act and RRGS Decree (Risk Report Hazardous Substances)
    • Ministerial Regulation
    • Every level in government has to deliver data, within ascertain periode of time (legal obligation)
    Transference of the functional design of the Model Risk Map by home secretary Remkes to the Queens Commissioner (governor) Alders for the twelve provinces on 27th of november 2003.
  • 20. 2. ENTRY RRGS Data ISOR Data 3. DISTRIBUTION ISOR Data RRGS Data Specific Provincial data geo viewer Central databases internet Is it safe ? 4. PRESENTATION Information flow Replication 1. COLLECT
  • 21. RRGS Environmental Act Housing, spatial planning and environment Ministerial regulation Internal Affairs ISOR Optional Usefull tot have, not forced by law Hazardous substances Hazardous substances Other risks Data delivery All risks Municipalty Municipalty Province Nat. Gov. Data Law
  • 22. 2. ENTRY RRGS Data ISOR Data 3. DISTRIBUTION ISOR Data RRGS Data Specific Provincial data geo viewer Central databases internet Is it safe? 4. PRESENTATION Information flow Replication 1. COLLECT
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25. 2. ENTRY RRGS Data ISOR Data 3. DISTRIBUTION ISOR Data RRGS Data Specific Provincial data geo viewer Central databases internet Is it safe ? 4. PRESENTATION Information flow Replication 1. COLLECT
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
  • 29.  
  • 30. Multilingual
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33. WMS Web Map Service
  • 34.  
  • 35. DDE Data Delivery
  • 36. Intentions before
    • “ If we can’t make it safer, we can at least share the facts”
  • 37. Benefits on content and policy
    • Providing government information:
    • transparency and trust
    • Data quality = better understanding en preparation
    • Trigger for control and enforcement
    • Setting priorities according to risk grade
    • Communication on risks
    • Reinforcement of the safety chain
  • 38. Benefits conceptual
    • Versatile basic design for many applications
    • Chain product: coöperation among all governments
    • Automated interface for daily updates
    • Web-based technology, interactive access
    • On demand retrieval of information
    • Open source mapviewer (www.flamingo-mc.org)
  • 39. Result now
    • “ Easy access to shared information provides better safety for all”
    • Before
    • “ If we can’t make it safer, we can at least share the facts”
  • 40.  
  • 41. International theme: Flooding
    • Dyked areas
    • Floodingdepth
      • Result of floodingdepth-calculations per dyked area as a result of various scenarios
      • Floodinggrid calculated by 50x50 meter
    • Idenfity in map shows floodingdepth
    • EU Flood directive (2007 into force, )
  • 42.  
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45.
    • Context
    • About the risk map in the Netherlands
    • International coöperation
    • Future developments … and beyond
    Program
  • 46. Why risk maps
  • 47. Why not in Europe?
  • 48.  
  • 49.  
  • 50.  
  • 51. Polizeidirektion Osnabrück LGN (Daten) Bezirken–Kreisen–Kreisfreie Städte Innenministerium NRW LDS (Datenaustausch) und Umweltmin. Bezirken–Kreisen–Kreisfreie Städte Provincie Overijssel IPO (Datenaustausch) Ansprechpartner ‘ Datenpartner’
  • 52. International
    • Coöperation with Germany-Belgium-Luxemburg
    • Based on international standards
    • Concerns
    • Cultural differences about transparency
    • Different meaning of terms
    • Different symbols
    • Infrastructure and security
  • 53.  
  • 54.  
  • 55. Access to the risk map Municipal websites www. municipality name .nl Provincial websites risicokaart.overijssel.nl www. provincename .nl National website www.risicokaart.nl Websites or regional emergency services and waterboards
  • 56.
    • Context
    • About the risk map in the Netherlands
    • International coöperation
    • Future developments … and beyond
    Program
  • 57. Future developments
    • Aerial pictures (oktober 2009)
    • Permits
    • Extensions
      • Spatial planning / digital exchange of spatial plans
      • Environmental data
    • Across national borders Germany and Belgium
    • ‘ National Register’
    • Web 2.0: interactive website
  • 58.  
  • 59. http://translate.google.com
  • 60. Recall: Benefits on content and policy
    • Providing government information:
    • transparency and trust
    • Data quality = better understanding and preparation
    • Trigger for control and enforcement
    • Setting priorities according to risk grade
    • Communication on risks
    • Reinforcement of the safety chain
  • 61. Do we want to …
    • provide government information:
    • be transparent and reliaible
    • improve environmental data quality
    • Improve disastermanagement
    • want a trigger for control and enforcement
    • set priorities according to risk grade
    • communicate on risks
    • reinforce the safety chain
    … in Europe?
  • 62. Questions? More information: www.risicokaart.nl [email_address] [email_address]