Discussion:

Judaism is the religion, philosophy and lie of the Jewish people. It is monotheistic
religion in the Hebrew b...
unequally and any kind of discrimination and all the humans follow that (Jacobs, Louis,
2007, p. 511).
Place is also very ...
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Religion essay essay sample from assignmentsupport.com essay writing services

  1. 1. Discussion: Judaism is the religion, philosophy and lie of the Jewish people. It is monotheistic religion in the Hebrew bible and later on explore as Talmud. The conventional relationship that developed by the God to the Children of Israel. It is claimed as 3000 years old religion and defined as one of the oldest religion of the world and also as the oldest religion that has been survived till today world. Judaism has directly and indirectly influenced the secular western ethics and civil war (Experiencing the World’s Religions, pp. 289-341). This religion only adopts those who have born to the religion or changes in to Judaism. The most important feature of this Judaism is the Jewish Law as the Torah and Jewish laws are originated by divine and these are unalterable and eternal. Second feature is the Social Justice, as because it teaches to the humans about the importance of the social justice. Social justice in Judaism is defined as for the individual or the community as fairly treated, there should not be any discrimination among all (Anthology of World Scriptures, pp. 219-253) The philosophy is of the humans as all are created in the image of God and therefore entitled to dignity and equal opportunity. Third is the place of worship in Judaism as the worship of place is very special in this religion is like a church to Christians or a mosque to Muslims. Every person belongs to this religion need to only pray to the God in this kind of special place of worship. There are some other essential features of this religion that creates impact on the humans who belong to this religion (Shaye J.D. Cohen 1999, p. 7). The thoughts and ideas are also very different than other religious and the practice of the religion are also quite different. These three features have been selected for the Judaism religion because these are most important things in the religion and everyone who suppose to follow the religion need to strongly follow these three features because rules and regulations are important. Also the social justice as the religion states need not to be ignored by the people because the main aim of the religion is not see the humans 1
  2. 2. unequally and any kind of discrimination and all the humans follow that (Jacobs, Louis, 2007, p. 511). Place is also very important as it is the divine place and can’t be create anyplace, this place is very scared and holy. The orthodox of this religion is that it follows the very traditional rules and don’t change according to the modern world. The humans who belong to this religion are very conservative to the spiritual thinking and the message of the religion. The rituals of this religion are very strong as for example for ritual purity law relates to the segregation of menstruating the women (Heribert Busse, 1998, pp. 63– 112). The people in this religion only eat kosher food that is written in Bible. For example, these people don’t eat pork or shellfish or mix milk and meat products. Thus, this religion is very strict in terms of religious norms and still today it is maintaining the laws. References: 1. “Judaism”, chapter 8, in Experiencing the World’s Religions, 5th edition, pp. 289-341 2. Anthology of World Scriptures, 7th edition, pp. 219-253 3. Shaye J.D. Cohen 1999 The Beginnings of Jewishness: Boundaries, Varieties, Uncertainties, Berkeley: University of California Press; p. 7 4. Jacobs, Louis (2007). "Judaism". In Fred Skolnik. Encyclopaedia Judaica. 11 (2d ed.). Farmington Hills, Mich.: Thomson Gale. p. 511 5. Heribert Busse (1998). Islam, Judaism, and Christianity: Theological and Historical Affiliations. Markus Wiener Publishers. pp. 63–112 . 2

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