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Film Art Chapter 2
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Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 2 The Significance of Film Form © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Form as a System
    • Artwork cues us to perform an activity.
    • The cues are a system that can be analyzed.
    • Form can be content.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 3. Form and Expectation
    • By building expectation, form can deliver many reactions.
    • Shock, surprise, satisfaction, and suspense all build upon the viewer’s assumptions.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 4. Conventions and Experience
    • Conventions are based on the viewer’s prior experience.
    • Artwork can create new expectations and conventions.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 5. Form and Feeling
    • Emotions within the artwork and emotional responses from the viewer can interact.
    • This relationship can be complicated and affected by personal experience.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 6. Form and Meaning
    • Referential: meanings within a film that rely on familiarity with significant places or things.
    • Explicit: meanings that are openly asserted.
    • Implicit: an implied or interpreted meaning.
    • Symptomatic: an abstract, general meaning that depends on social ideology.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 7. Evaluation
    • Criteria should guide objective evaluation
    • Personal taste and “goodness” or “badness” does not enter in to evaluation.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 8. Principles of Film Form
    • A unified set of related, interdependent elements that create relationships between the parts.
    • Many are a matter of convention.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 9. Function
    • Every element within a film can have one or more function, fulfilling role(s) within the whole system.
    • Consider an element’s motivation when looking for significant functions.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 10. Similarity and Repetition
    • A significant element that is repeated in a film is a motif.
    • Patterns of motifs create expectation.
    • Strong similarities and repetition can created parallelism.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 11. Difference and Variation
    • Changes and variations of elements can create variety, contrast and change.
    • Seldom does repetition occur in exactly the same way in a film, and the differences can be meaningful.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 12. Development
    • A progression moving from beginning to middle to end.
    • A segmentation can point out similarities, differences and progression.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 13. Principle #5: Unity/Disunity
    • How relationships among elements come together or do not.
    • Creates broad patterns and thematic meanings.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.