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Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
Film Art Chapter 10
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  • 1. Chapter 10 Documentary, Experimental and Animated Films © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Documentary
    • Presents facts in a trustworthy manner.
    • Events can be staged.
    • Can be misleading, inaccurate or partisan.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 3. Types of Documentary
    • Compilation films assemble images from archival sources.
    • Interview or talking-heads documentaries record testimony about events or social movements.
    • Direct-cinema records an ongoing event as it happens with little directorial interference.
    • Nature documentaries explore nature.
    • Portrait documentaries center around a compelling person.
    • Often documentaries use several of these options.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 4. Boundaries Between Documentary and Fiction
    • Fictional films are assumed to be imaginary, although they may refer and comment on actual events.
    • Fiction film are typically staged, rehearsed, filmed and re-filmed.
    • Some films seek to blur the lines between documentary and fiction films.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 5. Types of Documentary Form: Categorical
    • Categories are groups that organize knowledge and can be formal or not.
    • Categorical documentaries show all the categories and subcategories of a subject.
    • Development is usually simple.
    • Exciting or broad categories, patterned film techniques and mini-narratives can keep the subject interesting.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 6. Gap-Toothed Women
    • Consists of interviews with women with gaps in their front teeth.
    • The theme is that society has a narrow view of beauty.
    • The explicit meaning is the broad reaction to the way the women feel about their gaps.
    • The implicit meaning is that gaps are attractive and natural.
    • The symptomatic meaning could be a reaction to the shift of the radical ideas of the 1960s to the mainstream 1980s, when it was made.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 7. Rhetorical Form
    • The goal is to persuade the audience to adopt or act on an opinion.
    • Addresses viewer openly, trying to move the viewer.
    • Subject is usually a matter of opinion.
    • Often appeals to our emotions rather than facts.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 8. Three types of arguments
    • Arguments from source: arguments will come from reliable sources of information.
    • Subject-centered: employs arguments about it’s subject matter, using examples, enthymemes, and common beliefs.
    • Viewer-centered: arguments that appeal to emotions.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 9. The River
    • Persuades the audience that the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) is the answer to the region’s problems with flooding, agricultural depletion and electrification.
    • Was controversial at the time.
    • Has eleven segments that on the surface seem to just inform about the Mississippi, but through repetition, variation and development are very persuasive.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 10. Experimental Film
    • Willfully nonconformist, challenging notions of what a movie can show and how it can show it.
    • Frequently explores self-expression and experimentation outside mainstream cinema.
    • Can use narrative, abstract or associational form.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 11. Abstract Form
    • Organized around colors, shapes, sizes or movements of the images.
    • Often uses theme and variations.
    • Goal is to make the viewer notice relationships and elements they wouldn’t normally notice.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 12. Ballet mécanique
    • Draws a comparison between the human body and machines by turning human action into mechanical gestures.
    • Stresses the geometric qualities of ordinary things.
    • Uses theme and variations by introducing motifs in rapid succession, then bringing them back in different combinations later.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 13. Associational Form
    • Ideas and expressive qualities group images that may not have any logical connection.
    • Like metaphor and simile used in poetry.
    • Images are typically grouped into larger sets, each which is a distinct, unified part of the larger film.
    • Repeated motifs reinforce associational connections.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 14. A Movie
    • Juxtaposes found footage to communicate a range of emotionally charged ideas and qualities.
    • The music has distinct segments, each with its own tone, which corresponds to the film.
    • Constantly shifting associations convey many implicit meanings without any explicit meaning.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 15. The Animated Film
    • Not filmed in real time.
    • Spans all types of films: narrative, documentary and experimental.
    • Types include drawn, cut outs, clay, model, pixilation, and computer imaging.
    • Can be mixed with live action.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 16. Duck Amuck
    • Has an experimental feel because it asks the audience to explore cel animation techniques.
    • Draws attention to painted backgrounds, framing, sound effects, music, onscreen and offscreen space, and time.
    • Capitalizes on the character traits of Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 17. Fuji
    • Also explores animation techniques, but as its subject.
    • Groups images by principles of abstract form.
    • The first moments establish the devices that will be varied.
    • Juxtaposes live action and animated images using rotoscoping.
    • Creates planes in depth.
    © 2010 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

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