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Bordwell 10e ppt_ch11 Bordwell 10e ppt_ch11 Presentation Transcript

  • Chapter 11Film Criticism: Sample Analyses1© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • Sample Analyses• Narrative films, alternatives to narrative form,documentary, and analyses that emphasizesocial ideology will be examined.• All of the films discussed can be analyzed inother ways as well.• These analyses are examples of strategies thatyou can apply in your writing.2© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • The Classical Narrative Cinema:His Girl Friday• Segmentation shows the pace of characterinteractions contribute to the overall pace.• Deadlines within the plot and the clash ofcharacter traits and goals propel the causeand effect.• Time and space are subordinate to cause andeffect.• Telephones play an important role in causeand effect.3© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • North by Northwest• Using classical narrative patterns, a strict timescheme and motifs keep the narrative unified.• Point-of-view shots offer a degree ofsubjectivity.• Continually emphasizes surprise and suspensethrough careful manipulation of the hierarchyof knowledge.• Hitchcock also uses climactic sequences.4© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • Do The Right Thing• Stretches traditional Hollywood conventionswhile still upholding conventional techniques.• Setting and a limited time frame unify the plot.• The main causal action falls into two lines: Sal’srelations with the community and Mookie’spersonal life.• Cinematic technique loosely uses the continuitysystem and emphasizes the community as awhole.• Style also stresses the underlying problems in thecommunity.5© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • Do The Right Thing• Characters create goals sporadically.• Will conflicts be resolved peacefully orviolently?• Lee’s choices emphasize the community as awhole.© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 6
  • Narrative Alternative:Breathless (À Bout de souffle)• A classic story line presented nonclassically.• Rejects classical Hollywood causality.• Classic film technique is also rejected, usinginstead location shooting, and natural lightand sound.• Often breaks away from traditional editingtechniques.7© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • Tokyo Story (Tokyo Monogatari)• Spatial and temporal structures areemphasized over narrative events.• Camera and editing patterns involve using afull circle.• Taken together, film technique suggests adifferent relationship among setting, duration,and story action than exists in a classicalHollywood film.8© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • Chunking Express(Chung Hing sam lam)• Involves six characters in two distinct storiespresented side-by-side.• The lines of action in the two parts aren’tlinked causally, which forces you to seek otherconnections.• Motifs link the two stories, as does the themethat change is a part of love.9© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • Documentary Form and Style:Man with a Movie Camera• Takes the “kino eye” idea as the basis for thefilm’s associational form.• Exploits the power to control our perceptionof reality by means of editing and specialeffects.• Draws a connection between the camera andhuman actions.• Explicit and implicit meanings may be missedby viewers who aren’t familiar with Russian.10© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • The Thin Blue Line• Uses narrative form, but not in a wholly linearway.• Form and style shape our sympathies subtlyand ask us to reflect on the obstacles toarriving at the truth about any crime.• It is both an account of what really happenedwhile sending the message that persistentinquirers can eventually arrive at truth.11© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • Form, Style, and Ideology:Meet Me in St. Louis• Reinforces certain aspects of a social ideology:American values of family unity and homelife.• Dialogue, stylistic devices, and mise-en-scenecontribute to the feeling of a happy family life.• Referential, explicit, implicit, and symptomaticmeanings all emphasize the social ideology.12© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • Raging Bull• There is both sympathy and revulsion towardsJake.• Narrative and stylistic strategies make Jake a casestudy in the role of violence in American life.• The narrative organization of incidents andmotifs suggest that male aggression pervadesAmerican life.• Stylistic techniques depict the violence asdisturbing but also mesmerizing.13© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.