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Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
Bordwell 10e ppt_ch05
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Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 5The Shot: Cinematography1© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Cinematography• The director controls what is filmed and howit is filmed.• Cinematographic qualities include thephotographic aspects of the shot, the framingof the shot, and the duration of the shot.2© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 3. The Photographic Image: Tonalities• Whatever the director does to film, the resultaffects the pattern of light on the film itself.• Contrast is affected by film stock.• Developing procedures can alter color andcontrast.• Exposure can manipulate color and contrast, aswell as achieve special effects.• The result can guide the viewer’s eye toimportant elements.3© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 4. The Photographic Image: Speed ofMotion• Slow motion may mean a dream or fantasy,convey power, or express a lyrical quality.• Fast motion is an attention-grabber.• Digital postproduction allows for smooth andeasy motion change.4© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 5. The Photographic Image: Perspective• Lenses change scale and depth depending onfocal length.• They can distort images, flatten space, andexaggerate depth.• Zoom lenses manipulate focal length andtransform perspective in one shot.5© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 6. The Photographic Image:Depth of Field and Focus• Focal length affects depth of field.• Depth of field effects are common in digitalvideo.• Selective focus and racking focus can directthe audience’s attention.6© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 7. The Photographic Image:Special Effects• Combining two planes of action in one shotcan be achieved through superimposition,process shots, and matte work.• Reemergence of 3D.• Evaluation should be based on how thetechnique functions in the overall film.7© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 8. Frame Dimensions and Shape• Defines the image and creates a vantagepoint, directing the viewer’s attention.• Aspect ratio has changed over time.• Widescreen formats have been achievedthrough masking and anamorphic process.8© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 9. Onscreen and Offscreen Space• There are six zones of offscreen space, theedges of the frame, the space behind and infront of the set.• By using these unseen spaces, the director canachieve, surprise, suspense, and other effects.9© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 10. Angle, Level, Height, Distance ofFraming• Particular use of these elements often has anarrative function.• They also frequently have a stylistic functionas well, adding visual interest and creatingmeaning.10© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 11. The Mobile Frame• Panning, tilting, tracking, and craning increaseinformation about the space and objectsshown.• Often the camera is a substitute for theviewer, creating subjectivity.11© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 12. Functions of Frame Mobility1. Mobile frame and space: can be used todirect the viewer’s attention and createdifferent conceptions of space.2. Mobile frame and time: a moving camerauses more time, and thus createsexpectation.3. Patterns of movements can become motifs.12© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 13. Mobile Framing in Grand Illusionand Wavelength• In Grand Illusion, mobile framing supports thenarrative by creating moments of unrestrictednarration and creating patterns and parallels.• In Wavelength the focus is on the way a zoomshot transforms space by limiting movementand narrative information.13© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  • 14. Duration of the Image: The Long Take• Does not condense time.• Can create parallels and contrasts betweenscenes and can have its own development ofbeginning, middle, and end.• Can present a complex pattern of eventsmoving toward a goal.14© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

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