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    Bordwell 10e ppt_ch02 Bordwell 10e ppt_ch02 Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 2The Significance of Film Form1© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Form as a System• Artwork cues us to perform an activity.• The cues are a system that can be analyzed.• Form can be content.2© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Form and Expectation• By building expectation, form can delivermany reactions.• Shock, surprise, satisfaction, and suspense allbuild upon the viewer’s assumptions.3© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Conventions and Experience• Conventions are based on the viewer’s priorexperience.• Artwork can create new expectations andconventions.4© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Form and Feeling• Emotions within the artwork and emotionalresponses from the viewer can interact.• This relationship can be complicated andaffected by personal experience.5© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Form and Meaning• Referential: meanings within a film that relyon familiarity with significant places or things.• Explicit: meanings that are openly asserted.• Implicit: an implied or interpreted meaning.• Symptomatic: an abstract, general meaningthat depends on social ideology.6© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Evaluation: Good, Bad, orIndifferent?• Criteria should guide objective evaluation.• Personal taste and “goodness” or “badness”do not enter into evaluation.7© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Principles of Film Form• A unified set of related, interdependentelements that create relationships betweenthe parts.• Many are a matter of convention.8© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Function• Every element within a film can have one ormore function, fulfilling role(s) within thewhole system.• Consider an element’s motivation whenlooking for significant functions.9© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Similarity and Repetition• A significant element that is repeated in a filmis a motif.• Patterns of motifs create expectation.• Strong similarities and repetition can createparallelism.10© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Difference and Variation• Changes and variations of elements can createvariety, contrast, and change.• Seldom does repetition occur in exactly thesame way in a film, and the differences can bemeaningful.11© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Development• A progression moving from beginning tomiddle to end.• A segmentation can point out similarities,differences, and progression.12© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
    • Unity and Disunity• How relationships among elements cometogether or do not.• Creates broad patterns and thematicmeanings.13© 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.