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Cognitivist theory

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  • 1. ALLEN PAIVIODual Coding Theory –Assumes that people processinformation in two different ways• Processing of images• Processing of language
  • 2. ROBERT GAGNENine events of Instruction:• Gain attention of the learners• Inform learners of the objective• Stimulate recall of prior learning• Present the stimulus or lesson• Provide learning guidance and instruction• Elicit performance• Provide feedback• Assess performance• Enhance retention and transfer
  • 3. HOWARD GARDNEREight Intelligences• Linguistic-verbal• Logical-Mathematical• Spatial-Visual• Body-Kinesthetic• Musical• Interpersonal• Intrapersonal• Naturalist
  • 4. BENJAMIN BLOOMLearning Domains• Cognitive• Affective• PsychomotorBloom’s Taxonomy: Competencies• Knowledge• Comprehension• Application• Analysis• Synthesis• Evalution
  • 5. BERNARD WEINERAttribution Theory• Locus of control (two poles: internal vs. external).• Stability (do causes change over time or not?)• Controllability (causes one can control such as skills vs. causes one cannot control such as luck, others’ actions, etc.)
  • 6. KEY POINTS OF THEORYThe cognitivist paradigm essentially argues that the “black box” of the mind should be opened and understood. The learner is viewed as an information processor (like a computer).People are not “programmed animals” that merely respond to environmental stimuli.Cognitivism uses the metaphor of the mind as computer: information comes in, is being processed, and leads to certain outcomes.
  • 7. CLASSROOM IMPLICATIONSAs a teacher you would not want to treat children like they are cattle and cannot understand what you are saying. All children can’t learn in the same way so in a classroom you would have to address all of the different learning abilities.
  • 8. MY THOUGHTSI feel that this would work in a classroom, the problem would be addressing all of the learning types. There are so many different types of learning that all of the learning ways will not be addressed. Most lesson plans only cover a couple of the learning ranges. What I would do is add a few steps into some lessons to cover more of the children’s learning abilities.
  • 9. WORKS CITEDhttp://www.learning-theories.com/cognitivism.html