• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Social Commerce - Grundlagen, Implementierung & Messbarkeit
 

Social Commerce - Grundlagen, Implementierung & Messbarkeit

on

  • 3,540 views

Seminararbeit zum Thema Social Commerce an der Hochschule Heilbronn

Seminararbeit zum Thema Social Commerce an der Hochschule Heilbronn

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,540
Views on SlideShare
3,540
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
156
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Social Commerce - Grundlagen, Implementierung & Messbarkeit Social Commerce - Grundlagen, Implementierung & Messbarkeit Document Transcript

    • Hochschule Heilbronn Technik • Wirtschaft • Informatik Studiengang Electronic Business (EB) Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement 281192Social Commerce - Strategie & Implementierung Abbildung 1: Social Commerce vorgelegt bei Prof. Dr. Sonja Salmen von Alexander Merkel Matr.-Nr. 170203 im Sommersemester 2011
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceInhaltsverzeichnisInhaltsverzeichnis  .....................................................................................................................   II  Abbildungsverzeichnis  ...........................................................................................................  IV  Tabellenverzeichnis  ................................................................................................................  IV  Management  Summary  ............................................................................................................  V  1.   Einleitung  ..............................................................................................................................  1   1.1.   Motivation  ..................................................................................................................................  1   1.2.   Ziel  der  Arbeit  ...........................................................................................................................  1  2.   Grundlagen  ...........................................................................................................................  1   2.1.   Web  2.0  /  Social  (X)  Grundlagen   .........................................................................................  1   2.1.1.   Begriffliche  Abgrenzung  Web  2.0  /  Social  Web?  ..................................................................  1   2.1.2.   Was  ist  ein  Social  Network?  ..........................................................................................................  3   2.1.3.   „User-­‐Generated  Content"  /  „Consumer  Generated  Media“  ............................................  5   2.1.4.   Social  Media  Marketing  /  SMM  ....................................................................................................  5   2.2.   Abgrenzung  E-­‐Commerce  /  Social  Commerce  ................................................................  5   2.2.1.   E-­‐Commerce  .........................................................................................................................................  5   2.2.2.   Social  Commerce  ................................................................................................................................  6  3.   Beispiele für Social Commerce  ..........................................................................................  8   3.1.   Social  Shopping   .........................................................................................................................  8   3.1.1.   Social  Media  Stores  ...........................................................................................................................  8   3.1.2.   Portable  Social  Graph  .......................................................................................................................  9   3.1.3.   Group  Gifting  (Gruppen-­‐Geschenkkauf)  ..................................................................................  9   3.1.4.   Gruppenkauf  ........................................................................................................................................  9   3.1.5.   Social  Shopping  Portale  ................................................................................................................  10   3.2.   Bewertungen  ...........................................................................................................................  10   3.2.1.   Kundenbewertungen  und  –Rezensionen  .............................................................................  10   3.2.2.   Expertenbewertungen  und  –Rezensionen  ...........................................................................  11   3.2.3.   Bezahlte  Rezensionen  ...................................................................................................................  11   3.2.4.   Kunden  Erfahrungsberichte  .......................................................................................................  11   3.3.   Empfehlungen  .........................................................................................................................  11   3.3.1.   Social  Bookmarking  .......................................................................................................................  11   3.3.2.   Affiliate-­‐Programme  ......................................................................................................................  12   3.3.3.   Social  Recommendations   .............................................................................................................  12   3.4.   Foren  &  Communities  ...........................................................................................................  13   3.4.1.   Diskussionsforen  .............................................................................................................................  13   3.4.2.   Q&A  Foren  ..........................................................................................................................................  13   3.4.3.   Retail  Blogs  ........................................................................................................................................  13   3.4.4.   Customer-­‐Communties   .................................................................................................................  13   3.5.   Social  Media  Optimization  ..................................................................................................  14   3.5.1.   Newsfeeds  ..........................................................................................................................................  15   3.5.2.   Deal  Feeds  ..........................................................................................................................................  16   3.5.3.   Media  Sharing  ...................................................................................................................................  16   3.5.4.   Social  Media  Events  .......................................................................................................................  16   3.5.5.   Link  Building  .....................................................................................................................................  16   3.6.   Social  Ads  &  Apps  ...................................................................................................................  17   3.6.1.   Social  Advertising  ...........................................................................................................................  17   3.6.2.   Social  Apps  .........................................................................................................................................  18   3.6.3.   Shop  Widgets  ....................................................................................................................................  18   - II -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce 3.7.   F-­‐Commerce  .............................................................................................................................  19   3.7.1.   Facebook  Shop-­‐Lösungen  ...........................................................................................................  19   3.7.2.   Facebook  Open  Graph  ...................................................................................................................  20   3.7.3.   Facebook  Credits  .............................................................................................................................  21   3.7.4.   Facebook  Deals  ................................................................................................................................  22   3.7.5.   Facebook  Check-­‐In  Deals  .............................................................................................................  22  4.   Strategie für die Implementierung von Social Commerce  .......................................  23   4.1.   Zuhören  (Listen)  ....................................................................................................................  23   4.2.   Experimentieren  und  Testen  (Experiment)  .................................................................  24   4.3.   Anwenden  (Apply)  ................................................................................................................  24   4.4.   Weiterentwickeln  (Develop)  .............................................................................................  25   4.5.   Erfolge  messen  in  Social  Commerce  ................................................................................  25   4.5.1.   ROI  .........................................................................................................................................................  25   4.5.2.   Reputation   ..........................................................................................................................................  26   4.5.3.   Reichweite   ..........................................................................................................................................  26  Fazit  und  Ausblick  ...................................................................................................................  27   Was  bringt  Social  Commerce  für  E-­‐Commerce  Unternehmen?  ..........................................  27   Was  bringt  Social  Commerce  für  Kunden?  ................................................................................  27   Wie  könnte  es  weitergehen  mit  Social  Commerce?  ...............................................................  27  Literaturverzeichnis  ...............................................................................................................  VI   - III -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceAbbildungsverzeichnisAbbildung 1: Social Commerce..............................................................................................I  Abbildung 2: Social Media Prisma Ethority.de ..................................................................... 3  Abbildung 3: Eigene Darstellung Quelle: Compass Heading ............................................... 4  Abbildung 4: Nutzung von Social Networks 2011 ................................................................ 4  Abbildung 5: Amazon PartnerNet Eigene Darstellung........................................................ 12  Abbildung 6: Zielgruppendefinition für Facebook Ads ...................................................... 18  Abbildung 7: F-Commerce Übersicht von www.facebookbiz.de........................................ 19  Abbildung 8: F-Commerce Social Media Store smatch.com .............................................. 20  Abbildung 9: Like Button Funktionsweise(Open Graph).................................................... 20  Abbildung 10: Facebook Anwendung „The Dark Night“ gegen Facebook Credits............ 22  Abbildung 11: Facebook Check-In Deals............................................................................ 23  TabellenverzeichnisTabelle 1: Definitionen von Social Commerce...................................................................... 8Abkürzungsverzeichnis: SMM Social Media Marketing SMO Social Media Optimization SNE Soziales Netzwerk/Social Network UGC User Generated Content CGM Consumer Generated Media SMT Social Media Monitoring RSS Really Simple Syndication ROI Return on Invest - IV -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceManagement SummarySocial Commerce ist ein neues Thema das langsam in Unternehmen fuß fassen wird.Social Media Marketing befasste sich hauptsächlich mit der Steigerung der Reputation imSocial Web. Selten konnte diese Art der Kommunikation dafür sorgen, dass sich auch E-Commerce Unternehmen damit befasst haben, da es noch wenige Möglichkeiten gab dieSocial Media Nutzer zu Käufern zu machen. Langsam etablieren sich Lösungen und einVerständnis was alles zum Social Web gehört. Es haben sich viele Plattformen gebildet diegezielt eine Zielgruppe ansprechen. Facebook hat durch Ihre Facebook Fan Pages sowieden Social Plug-Ins viel dazu beigetragen, dass Social Commerce mehr und mehr einenpositiven ROI generiert. Der Like Button eignet sich für das Push-Marketing um Nutzerngezielt ein Produkt zu zeigen. Diese Marketingform war bis dahin dem Fernsehen, Papieroder Radio-Werbung vorbehalten. Facebook konnte dank Ihrer Social Plug-Ins noch mehrNutzer generieren und hat heute ca. 22 Millionen Nutzer in Deutschland und hat alleanderen Sozialen Netzwerke verdrängt. Social Commerce ist nun die Strategie all dieseSozialen Netzwerke da zuzubringen einen ROI zu generieren. Dies kann über mehrereArten von Social Commerce geschehen. Beispiele dafür sind Social Shopping,Bewertungen, Empfehlungen, Social Media Optimization, Foren & Communities, SocialAds & Apps und F-Commerce. All diese Arten vereinen sich zu Social Commerce. Es istnicht immer nützlich alle Arten mit in die Strategie aufzunehmen sondern nur die, die zurZielerreichung wichtig sind. Ein Online Shop Betreiber sollte sich mit allen Arten desSocial Commerce befassen, ein mittelständisches Unternehmen widerum ohne eigenenOnline Shop nur mit Bewertungen, SMO, Foren & Communities und Social Ads. Hiersollte die von McKinsey LEAD-Strategie für Web 2.0 angewendet werden.Listen(Zuhören), Experiment(Experimentieren & Testen), Apply(Anwenden) undDevelop(Weiterentwickeln), diese Strategie eignet sich für fast jedes Social Media Themaund kann auch für Social Commerce verwendet werden. Der ROI und die Conversion Ratedarf hier nicht vergessen werden und muss ständig geprüft werden. Deswegen sollte jedesUnternehmen anhand der 4 Schritte von McKinsey vorgehen und sich langsam mit demThema vertraut machen. Wichtig wird es bestimmt, denn es schafft dem Nutzer mehrvertrauen beim Konsumieren & Kaufen von Produkten. -V-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce 1. EinleitungSocial Media wird immer beliebter für Unternehmen, da die deutschen Internetnutzerimmer mehr auf Facebook, Twitter, Xing & Co. agieren. Social Media hat sich erfolgreichals ein Kanal für PR-Arbeit und Push-Marketing etabliert. E-Commerce Unternehmenversuchten ähnliche Erfolgsgeschichten zu verzeichnen konnten aber nur wenige SocialMedia Aktionen durchführen. Da Facebook immer etablierter wird und durch seine SocialPlug-Ins nun auch für E-Commerce Unternehmen interessant wird, kann Social Commercein den nächsten Jahren zum Trendthema werden. 1.1. MotivationSocial Commerce ist noch ein neuer Begriff der nicht genau definiert wurde. DieMotivation in dieser Seminararbeit lag darin den Begriff abzugrenzen in Bezug auf andereSocial Media Begriffe und die gesamte Palette von Social Commerce zu erfassen. 1.2. Ziel der ArbeitDas Ziel dieser Arbeit ist es die Forschungsfrage: „Was ist Social Commerce und welcheStrategien gibt es für die Implementierung in Unternehmen“. Hierbei soll eine einheitlicheDefinition gefunden werden die Social Commerce beschreibt sowie alle Möglichkeiten desSocial Commerce aufzudecken und anhand von Beispielen zu visualisieren. Außerdem sollanhand einer Strategie gezeigt werden wie Social Commerce in Unternehmen etablierterwerden kann und wie der Erfolg gemessen werden kann.2. Grundlagen 2.1. Web 2.0 / Social (X) Grundlagen2.1.1. Begriffliche Abgrenzung Web 2.0 / Social Web?Es gibt viele Überschneidungen zwischen den Begriffen Web 2.0 und dem Social Web.Deswegen soll in den nachfolgenden Kapiteln eine klare Abgrenzung erfolgen.2.1.1.1. Web 2.0Web 2.0 bezeichnet keine spezielle Technologie oder Software im Internet sondern ehereine Vision des Internet wo Nutzer Inhalte erstellen, teilen und/oder bewerten können. Hier -1-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commercestehen verschiedene Methoden und Werkzeuge im Vordergrund, die von allenInternetnutzern genutzt werden können und nicht nur von großen Medienunternehmen.1O’Reilly beschreibt 7 Kernkompetenzen, die ein Unternehmen mitbringen muss um Web2.0 anbieten zu können: 2 „ • Dienste, keine Paketsoftware, mit kosteneffizienter Skalierbarkeit • Kontrolle über einzigartige, schwer nachzubildende Datenquellen, deren Wert proportional zur Nutzungshäufigkeit steigt • Vertrauen in Anwender als Mitentwickler • Nutzung kollektiver Intelligenz • Erreichen des "Long Tail" mittels Bildung von Communities etc. • Erstellung von Software über die Grenzen einzelner Geräte hinaus • Leichtgewichtige User Interfaces, Entwicklungs- und Geschäftsmodelle“2.1.1.2. Social WebDas Social Web ist als Teilbereich des Web 2.0 anzusehen. Hierbei geht es nicht um dieMethoden und Werkzeuge, die dazu dienen Inhalte zu erstellen, teilen und/oder bewertensondern allein die Unterstützung sozialer Strukturen und Interaktionen mit dem MediumInternet.3Begriff „Social“ hat aber nichts mit dem Begriff „Sozial“ zu tun sondern wird z.B. sodefiniert: 4„ • Jeder kann publizieren. • Jeder kann Feedback geben und Dialoge beginnen. • Gespräche in einer ungezwungen, natürlich wirkenden Sprache lösen die typische Rhetorik der Unternehmenskommunikation ab. • Wissen ist frei verfügbar und wird geteilt. • Die Hierarchien sind flach, Reputation entsteht durch Vernetzung.“1 (Lammenett, E.: Praxiswissen Online-Marketing, 1. Auflage, Gabler | GWV Fachverlage GmbH,Wiesbaden 2009, S.196.)2 (OReilly, T.: Was ist Web 2.0?, online im Internet: URL: http://www.oreilly.de/artikel/web20_trans.html(Stand 1. Mai 2011). Übersetzt von Patrick Holz.)3 Vgl. (Ebersbach, A., Glaser, M. & Heigl, R.: Social Web, 1. Auflage, UVK Verlagsgesellschaft mbH,Konstanz 2008, S.29.)4 (Schindler, M.-C. & Liller, T.: PR im Social Web, 1. Auflage, O Reily, Köln 2011, S.6.) -2-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce Abbildung 2: Social Media Prisma Ethority.de5Die Social Media Prisma stellt sehr gut da für welchen Anwendungsfall es bereits ein SNEexistiert. All diese Dienste bilden zusammen das Social Web, dass wir heute kennen.2.1.2. Was ist ein Social Network?Social Networks existieren bereits so lange wie die Menschen. Der Begriff erlangte nurbesonderer Beliebtheit nachdem Web 2.0 basierende Plattformen wie Facebook, VZ’s,Twitter6, WerKenntWen uvm. entstanden sind. Aber auch schon die lange existierendenForen und Chats sind Social Networks. Überall wo Menschen die Möglichkeit haben sichmit anderen auszutauschen kann als Social Network bezeichnet werden.Hierzu ein Auszug von den aktuellen Nutzerzahlen der Social Networks in Deutschland,die von Google veröffentlicht und von Compass Heading aufbereitet wurden.5 (Franke, S., Dr. Köhler, B., Beckar, A., Hansen, C. et al.: Social Media Prisma DE,Veröffentlicht am:,online im Internet: URL: http://www.ethority.de/weblog/social-media-prisma/ (Stand 08. Mai 2011).)6 http://twitter.com -3-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce 2011   25   20   Facebook   15   Wer  Kennt  Wen   10   Holtzbrinck  VZs   5   Twitter   0   Xing   Facebook   Wer  Kennt   Holtzbrinck   Twitter   Xing   Wen   VZs   Abbildung 3: Eigene Darstellung Quelle: Compass Heading7Das Schaubild lässt erkennen, dass Facebook8 in Deutschland das größte SNE ist mit ca.22. Mio. Nutzern. Auch die Nutzungsrate ist bei diesem SNE höher als bei den anderenSNE. Ein nicht ganz so großes SNE ist Xing9. Mit ca. 3. Mio. Nutzern. Da Xing aberkostenpflichtig ist und eine ganz andere Zielgruppe anspricht ist das nicht verwunderlich.Da die Zielgruppe hauptsächlich Unternehmer sind ist hier die Nutzungsrate höher als beiden größeren SNE wie WerKenntWen10 oder VZ-Netzwerke11. Abbildung 4: Nutzung von Social Networks 2011127 (Radomski, M.: Compass Heading,Veröffentlicht am. März 2011 , online im Internet: URL:http://www.compass-heading.de/cms/aktuelle-nutzerzahlen-sozialer-netzwerke/ (Stand 1. Mai 2011).)8 http://facebook.com9 http://xing.com10 http://werkenntwen.de11 http://www.vz-netzwerke.net/12 (Bersch, A. & Firsching, J.: facebookbiz,Veröffentlicht am. Februar 2011 , online im Internet: URL:http://www.facebookbiz.de/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/W3B31_Social_Networks_regelmaessige_Nutzer.jpg (Stand 1. Mai 2011).) -4-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce2.1.3. „User-Generated Content" / „Consumer Generated Media“„User-Generated Content“ oder „Consumer Generated Media“ steht für Inhalte im Internet,die nicht von einem Unternehmen mit einem gewissen Ziel erstellt wurden sondern vomInternetnutzer. Dabei kann es sich hierbei um eine Empfehlung, Bewertung, Video, Foto,Kommentar, Webseite, Blog uvm. handeln. Für Videos gibt es YouTube13, bei FotosFlickr14, für Online Tagebücher Wordpress15 uvm. Es haben sich viele spezialisiertePortale entwickelt, die für Internetnutzer die Möglichkeit bieten Ihre Inhalte anderenzugänglich zu machen. All diese Inhalte werden von Internetnutzer für andere erstellt undnennen sich „User-Generated Content“ oder „Consumer Generated Media“.2.1.4. Social Media Marketing / SMMSocial Media Marketing ist ein Prozess mit dem über Soziale Netzwerke ihre Webseiten,Produkte oder Dienstleistungen bewerben kann. Dabei ist die eigentliche Strategie nichteinfach nur Werbung auf den Sozialen Netzwerken darzustellen, sondern die Menschendarin dazu zu bringen sich mit dem Produkt zu identifizieren und es zu empfehlen.16Tamar Weinberg beschreibt die Aufgabe von Social Media Marketing als: „DieCommunities richtig zu nutzen, um mit ihren Teilnehmern wirkungsvoll über relevanteProdukt- und Serviceangebote zu kommunizieren. Außerdem gehört zum Social MediaMarketing, diesen Communities zuzuhören und im Namen einer bestimmten FirmaBeziehungen zu ihnen aufzubauen.“17 2.2. Abgrenzung E-Commerce / Social Commerce2.2.1. E-Commerce„Unter dem Begriff E-Commerce bezeichnet man die reinen Handelsprozesse im Rahmendes Online-Verkaufs von Gütern. Darunter fällt hauptsächlich der Kauf und /oder Verkaufvon Produkten und Dienstleistungen über das Internet. E-Commerce ist eines derTeilgebiete des E-Business.“1813 http://www.youtube.de14 http://www.flickr.com15 http://www.wordpress.com16 vgl. (Düweke, E. & Rabsch, S.: Erfolgreiche Websites - SEO, SEM, Online Marketing, Usability, 1.Auflage, Galileo Press, Bonn n.d..)17 (Weinberg, T.: Social Media Marketing: Strategien für Twitter, Facebook & Co., Übersetzt von D.Heymann-Reder. OReilly, Köln 2010, S.4.)18 (Angeli, S. & Kundler, W.: Der Online Shop, Markt+Technik Verlag, München 2008, S.223.) -5-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce2.2.2. Social CommerceLeider gibt es für Social Commerce keine einheitliche Definition sondern vieleverschiedene, die sich jedes Jahr ändern. Hierzu alle Definitionen die sich seit 2005gesammelt haben:Jahr Autor Definition2005 David Beach The Shopossphere and Pick Lists are examples of social commerce. We believe the community of shoppers is one oft the best sources for product information and advice2005 Dave Beisel Subset of “advertorial content”, where content is the advertising… generated by a friend [wishlists... giftlists... picklists... tags... recommendations]… to provide consumers with rich social context and relevancy to the purchases which they are making2005 Steve Rubel Creating places where people can collaborate online, get advice from trusted individuals, find goods and services and then purchase them.2006 Dave Beisel Social input in online shopping services [that] augments the experience [c.f Social shopping: Sharing the act of shopping itself with others; ...a subset of social commerce as a whole]2006 Ken Goldstein Creating new and more meaningful ways for retailers to interact with customers [through] search, communication and community2007 Sam Decker Strategy of connecting customers to customers online and leveraging those connections for commercial purpose2007 Linus Gregoriadis Customers having the means to interact with one another in order to make better buying decisions2007 Lee Raito A trusted environment where friends, family and acquaintances dynamically contribute content to the referral and sale of goods and services though positive and negative feedback, reviews, ratings and testimonials regarding their experiences past & present. In short, social commerce is a trusted environment of which prospective consumers make buying decisions based on the advice of a network of friends and family, not strangers they don’t know or trust.2007 Wikipedia Subset of e-commerce in which the active participation of customers and their personal relationships are at the forefront.2008 Jay Deragon Conduct[ing] commerce using social networks2008 Brendan Gibbons Monetizing social media sites…applications transform[ing] a profile page on a social network into an online store, complete with -6-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce payment processing.2008 Craig Agranoff Buying and selling stuff online with friends helping2008 Andrew Stephen und Olivier Emerging trend in which sellers are connected Toubia in online social networks, and where sellers are individuals instead of firms. [The distinction between social shopping and social commerce is that while social shopping connects customers, social commerce connects sellers].2009 Jeremiah Owyang [The Fifth Era of Social Media]: Brands will serve community interests and grow based on community advocacy as users continue to drive innovation in this direction.2009 Paul Dunay Working with or using your social graph, which is defined as your followers or your friends, and allowing them to help you make buying decisions.2009 IBM Connect and foster active participation with customers to help improve your customer experience… including ratings and reviews, blogs, micro-blogging as well as forums and communities2009 Paul Marsden A subset of electronic commerce that involves using social media, online media that supports social interaction and user contributions, to assist in the online buying and selling of products and services. & The use of social media in the context of e- commerce2009 Pierre Raiman Social Commerce rises through trusted advice in conversations and word-of-mouth among your friends and relations in social networks, blogs, and communities, helping to make shopping decisions and transactions2010 John Jackson The ability of two or more people to collaborate online, to share opinions and influence each other’s buying decisions2010 Bill Zujewski Social Commerce is about customers having the means to interact with one another in order to make better buying decisions2010 Jochen Krisch Social commerce models are ecommerce models that focus on people instead of products2010 Jason Weaver Selling with Social Media2010 Lora Cecere Social commerce is the use of social technologies to connect, listen, understand, and engage to improve the shopping experience -7-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce Tabelle 1: Definitionen von Social Commerce19All diese Definitionen haben eines gemeinsam der Nutzer soll im Vordergrund stehen undes soll über Social Media den Verkauf optimieren. Sam Decker beschreibt SocialCommerce als: „Strategy of connecting customers to customers online and leveragingthose connections for commercial purpose“20.Die Definition von Jason Weaver lautet „Selling with Social Media“.Wenn beide Definitionen verbunden und mit dem Begriff E-Commerce ergänzt werden,ergibt sich folgende Definition:„Social Commerce beschreibt die Strategie den Internetnutzer im Vordergrund zu stellenund seine Meinungen, Eindrücke und Empfehlungen allen anderen Internetnutzernzugänglich zu machen. Hierbei gibt es keine Beschränkung auf bestimmte Plattformensondern es sollen alle Kanäle des Social Media genutzt werden, um eine neue Erfahrungund Sicherheit beim Kauf oder Verkauf von Produkten im Internet zu ermöglichen“213. Beispiele für Social Commerce 3.1. Social ShoppingSocial Shopping beschreibt die Nutzer in die Lage zu versetzen gemeinsam einzukaufenund Produkte zu empfehlen22. Hier können die Nutzer durch Affiliate Programme dazuanimiert werden, weitere Produkte Ihren vernetzen Freunden zu empfehlen und dabei perProvision belohnt werden.23 Weitere Beispiele für Social Shopping sind Social MediaStores, Portable Social Graph, Group Gifting, Gruppenkauf und Social Shopping Portale.3.1.1. Social Media StoresDr. Paul Marsden hat Social Media Stores folgendermaßen definiert: „Auf einer Social-Media- Plattform eingerichtete Shopping-Möglichkeiten, die dem Nutzer erlauben in demUmfeld einzukaufen, wo er seine Kontakte knüpft und pflegt.“2419 (Marsden, P.: SOCIAL COMMERCE TODAY,Veröffentlicht am: 2011, online im Internet: URL:http://socialcommercetoday.com/social-commerce-definition-word-cloud-definitive-definition-list/ (Stand 1.Mai 2011).)20 siehe 221 Eigene Definition vgl. (Jason Weaver, 2010 & Pierre Raiman 2009, Paul Marsden 2009, Sam Decker 2005)22 vgl. (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.13.)23 vgl. (Mühlenbeck, F. & Prof. Dr. Skibicki, K.: Verkaufsweg Social Commerce, Books on Demand, Köln2007, S.174.)24 (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag,Hamburg 2010, S.13.) -8-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceSocial Media Stores sind also Online Shops, die in Soziale Netzwerke integriert wurden.Die Nutzer können direkt Produkte in den Warenkorb legen und sobald Sie zur Kassegehen werden Sie zum angebundenen Online Shop weitergeleitet. Eine neue Methodekönnte sein, dass Nutzer direkt in den Sozialen Netzwerken einkaufen können. Hiermüssten die Nutzer Ihre Kreditkarte oder Bankkonto hinterlegen, was aber wahrscheinlichviele abschrecken würde.3.1.2. Portable Social GraphBietet Nutzern weitere Funktionen um während es Einkaufens im Internet mit seinenFreunden in Sozialen Netzwerken zu kommunizieren. Facebook Connect, Google’sFriendConnect und Twitter Outh bieten Schnittstellen für Online Shops, damit Nutzer sichnur noch mit Ihren Benutzernamen und Passwort aus den Sozialen Netzwerken anmeldenohne ständig alle Fomularfelder für die Registrierung ausfüllen zu müssen. Hier werdenaber weitere Funktionalitäten für die Nutzer bereitgestellt wie z.B. „Frag dein Netzwerk“oder „Mit deinem Netzwerk teilen“. Modelabels wie Burberry, Juicy Couture, CharlotteRusse, Luckybrand, JanSport und Vans nutzen diese Dienste bereits auf Ihren E-Commerce Plattformen.253.1.3. Group Gifting (Gruppen-Geschenkkauf)Dr. Marsden definiert diesen Begriff als die: „Möglichkeit, online gemeinsam ein Geschenkzu kaufen, wie etwa beim Elektronik-Großhändler BestBuy, der „Pitch In“ (Mach-mit)-Karten für den Gruppen-Geschenkkauf anbietet. Anbieter von Social-Shopping-Softwarewie z. B. eDivvy bieten Gruppen-Geschenkkauf-Dienste für ein breites Spektrum anMarken, Produkten und Websites.“263.1.4. GruppenkaufBei Gruppenkauf bietet man den Nutzern die Möglichkeit sich mit anderen zu vernetzenum ein gewissen Produkt in höherer Stückzahl zu bestellen, um so zu einem günstigerenPreis an das gewünschte Produkte zu gelangen. Der Computerhersteller Dell27 regt mitseinem Dienst „Dell Swarm“ die Nutzer dazu an, sich zu einem Schwarm zu vereinen um25 vgl. siehe 2426 vgl. siehe 3027 www.dell.com -9-
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceProdukte in höheren Stückzahlen und günstigeren Preis anzubieten.28 Wenn das Produktsehr neu oder beliebt ist, kann dieser Dienst einen Viralen Effekt erzielen und das Imagedes Unternehmens verbessern. Groupon29 ist z.B. ein Dienst, der es ermöglicht in Gruppeneinzukaufen um dadurch einen besseren Preis für das Produkt oder die Dienstleistung zuerzielen.303.1.5. Social Shopping Portale„Bieten die Möglichkeit, mit Hilfe mehrerer der oben genannten Social-Shopping-ToolsEinkäufe gemeinsam in mehreren E-Shops zu tätigen, häufig in Kombination mit nicht-synchronen Tools wie Bewertungen und Rezensionen, Empfehlungen und SocialBookmarking (siehe unten). Sie lassen sich ideal durch Preisvergleichs-Tools“31 wie z.B.Preissuchmaschine.de32, Guenstiger.de33, Geizhals.net34 etc. ergänzen. In den USAexistieren bereits Social Shopping Portale wie Kaboodle35 und ThisNext36 in Deutschlandgibt es bis heute noch keine vergleichbaren Portale. 3.2. BewertungenBewertungen gehören bereits zum Standard bei jedem Online Shop System. Sehr oftbelohnen die Online Shops Ihre Käufer mit einem zusätzlichen Gutschein, wenn diese nachdem Kauf eine Bewertung abgeben. Einer der ersten, die Bewertungen in Ihrem OnlineShop integriert haben war Amazon. Auch von der Bewertungsvielfalt ist Amazon auchführend obwohl Sie keine Belohnungen anbieten. Es gibt viele Arten von Bewertungen dienächsten Punkte beschreiben die einzelnen Arten nach der Definition von Dr. PaulMarsden.3.2.1. Kundenbewertungen und –RezensionenKundenbewertungen sind von Kunden erstellte Beurteilungen zur Produkt- oderDienstleistungsqualität, die anderen Nutzern helfen sich für ein Produkt zu entscheiden.Amazon und iTunes sind die Portale mit den meisten Bewertungen. Sie achten auch28 (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag,Hamburg 2010, S.14.)29 www.groupon.com30 vgl. siehe 2131 siehe 2132 www.preissuchmaschine.de33 www.guenstiger.de34 www.geizhals.net35 http://www.kaboodle.com/36 http://www.thisnext.com/ - 10 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commercebesonders darauf, dass niemand Kundenbewertungen fälscht. So hat iTunes im Jahr 2010einen Entwickler aus dem AppStore verbannt sowie alle anderen Apps des Entwicklersgelöscht.3.2.2. Expertenbewertungen und –RezensionenSind Meinungen oder Beurteilungen von ausgewählten Experten von Ihrem Fach. So wirdz.B. bei Produkttests für IT-Produkte sehr oft auf die Meinung von Walter Mosberg37 vomWallstreet Journal vertraut.3.2.3. Bezahlte RezensionenBezahlte Rezensionen sind gezielt gestreute Bewertungen an Personen die einen Blog oderSoziales Netzwerk betreiben mit vielen Nutzern. In den seltensten fällen wird daraufhingewiesen, dass die Rezensionen bezahlt war.3.2.4. Kunden Erfahrungsberichte„Eine Variante der Kundenrezension sind Stimmen von Testimonials, weniger straffstrukturierte Erfahrungsberichte mit Erzählcharakter auf E-Commerce-Sites oder Social-Media-Plattformen. Sie werden von15Ratings & Review-Software-Unternehmen wie etwa Bazaarvoice und PowerReviewsangeboten.“38 3.3. EmpfehlungenEmpfehlungen sind ein wichtiges Werkzeug von Social Commerce. Viele Nutzer treffenanhand von Meinungen von Freunden oder Familienangehörige gezielteKaufentscheidungen. Denn wenn jemand das Produkt besitzt und zufrieden damit ist, wirder es auch gerne empfehlen. Im Internet passiert das über Social Bookmarking, Affiliate-Programme und Social Recommendations.3.3.1. Social BookmarkingSocial Bookmarking speichert Produkte oder Webseiten die den Nutzer gefallen und stelltes auf Plattformen wie z.B. Mister Wong, OneView, Amazon Wunschzettel uvm. zurVerfügung. Das Ziel ist es anderen die Kaufentscheidungen zu erleichtern, indem gezeigt37 http://walt.allthingsd.com/38 (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag,Hamburg 2010, S.15.) - 11 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commercewird, dass mehrere Nutzer dieses Produkt besitzen und das es auch meinen Wünschenentsprechen kann.3.3.2. Affiliate-ProgrammeAffiliate-Programme sind sog. Empfehlungsprogramme, die den Nutzer belohnen wenn eranderen Nutzern ein Produkt empfiehlt. Die meisten Affiliate-Programme laufen überBlogs und Foren ab. Amazon ist bereits einen Schritt weiter und bietet allen Nutzern dieMöglichkeit an Ihrem Partnerprogramm teilzuhaben. Hier ist es besonders einfach einProdukt aus dem Shop mit dem passenden Affiliate-Link zu erhalten und meinen SNEFreunden zu senden. Abbildung 5: Amazon PartnerNet Eigene Darstellung3.3.3. Social RecommendationsSocial Recommendations sind Kauf-Empfehlungen anhand der Daten aus dem eigenenProfil, Einkaufs- und Surfverhalten sowie von anderen Nutzern39. Ähnlich dem Cross-Selling Prinzips, nur dass nun auch die Daten der Freunde mitgerechnet werden.39 vgl. (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.15.) - 12 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce 3.4. Foren & CommunitiesEin Forum ist eine Webseite mit dem Ziel über gewisse Themen zu diskutieren. ImVergleich zu einem Chat erfolgt die Kommunikation asyncron40. Heute existieren sehrviele Foren die immer für gewisse Themen erstellt und betrieben werden. Ein Forum eignetsich besonders für Social Commerce, da Sie eine moderierte und betreute Umgebungdarstellen.413.4.1. DiskussionsforenDiskussionsforen sind dafür gedacht, dass Mitglieder über bestimmte Themen Diskutieren.Z.B. bieten andere Mitglieder Unterstützung zu gewissen Problemen mit einem Produktoder Dienstleistung. 423.4.2. Q&A ForenQ & A sind Frage-und-Antwort Dienste, in der Nutzer Fragen stellen können oder andereneine Antwort auf Ihre Fragen geben können. Die Portale GuteFrage43, WerWeisWas44 undCOSMiQ45 sind Deutschlands führende Portale mit einem Frage-und-Antwort Dienst.3.4.3. Retail BlogsRetail Blogs sind Webseiten die Neuigkeiten zu Produkten oder anstehenden E-CommerceEvents zur Verfügung stellen. Durch das veröffentlichen soll eine Diskussionhervorgerufen werden, die den Produktmanager hilft die Produkte oder die Events besseran den Nutzer anzupassen umso den Verkauf zu optimieren. Weitere Möglichkeiten sindauch die Nutzer aktiv mitarbeiten zu lassen und Ideen und Verbesserungsvorschläge zuveröffentlichen, die auch dem Ziel der Verkaufssteigerung dienen können46.3.4.4. Customer-Communties„Online-Communitys von Kunden bzw. Partnern, verlinkt mit einer E-Commerce-Site, inder Regel mit einem auf Kundentreue, Beratung oder sozialen Komponenten fokussierten40 vgl. (Mühlenbeck, F. & Prof. Dr. Skibicki, K.: Verkaufsweg Social Commerce, Books on Demand, Köln2007, S.174.)41 vgl. (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.15.)42 vgl. siehe 2543 http://www.gutefrage.net44 http://www.wer-weiss-was.de/45 http://www.cosmiq.de/46 vgl. (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.15.) - 13 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceCRM (Customer Relationship Management, auch Social CRM). Customer-Communityskönnen auf Social- Media-Plattformen wie Facebook oder lokalmit spezifischer Community-Software gehostet werden (z. B. Ripple6 and Pluck).“47 3.5. Social Media OptimizationAuch das Social Media Optimization ist nicht 100% definiert. So beschreibt Frau Rauschvon Traubenberg SMO als: „ein Instrument des viralen Marketings und beschreibt dieOptimierung einer Website für Soziale Medien. Durch die gegenseitige Vernetzung vonrelevanten Inhalten soll die Aufmerksamkeit der Nutzer gewonnen werden, um so viraleEffekte hervorzurufen.“48Prof. Dr. Mario Fischer beschreibt es als: „eine Methode, sich Traffic und letztlich Linksüber das Web zu besorgen über Social-Networking Plattformen wie z.B. Bookmarking-Dienste & Blog-Aggregatoren“49Etwas konkreter beschreibt es Rohit Bhargava mit den 5 Regeln des SMO50: 1. Verbessern der Verlinkungssfähigkeit der eigenen Webseite 2. Das Tagging und Bookmarking einfach gestalten 3. Belohnen von eingehenden Links in dem man Sie sichtbar macht 4. Helfen den eigenen Inhalt wandern zu lassen 5. Bereitstellen des eigenen Inhalts per RSSDa dies aber nicht alles von SMO beinhaltet hat Jeremiah Owyang die Regeln um 2weitere ergänzt:51 6. Eine Nutzer Informationsquelle sein auch wenn es einem nicht hilft 7. Belohnen von aktiven und hilfsbereiten NutzernAuch weitere Personen haben diese Regeln ergänzt mit Ihren Ideen und Eindrücken:Cameron Olthuis:52 8. Partizipieren ist wichtig suchen Sie die Konversation mit dem Nutzer 9. Immer wissen was die eigene Zielgruppe ist47 (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag,Hamburg 2010, S.15.)48 (Rausch von Traubenberg, E.: Social Media Optimization als Instrument des Online- undSuchmaschinenmarketings, Darmstadt 2008, S.8.)49 vgl. (Prof. Dr. Fischer, M.: Website Boosting 2.0, 2. Auflage, mitp, Heidelberg 2009, S.400.)50 (Bhargava, R.: Influential Marketing Blog,Veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL:http://rohitbhargava.typepad.com/weblog/2006/08/5_rules_of_soci.html (Stand 08. Mai 2011).)51 (Owyang, J.: Web Strategy,Veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2006/08/13/rules-of-social-media-optimization/ (Stand 08. Mai 2011).)52 (Olthuis, C.: Pronet Advertising,Veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL:http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/introduction-to-social-media-optimization.html (Stand 08. Mai2011).) - 14 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceLoren Baker:53 10. Erstellen von Inhalten 11. Authentisch sein 12. Nie die Ursprünge vergessen und bescheiden bleiben 13. Nie ängstlich gegenüber neuen Dingen sein, immer am Ball bleibenLee Odden:54 14. Erstellen Sie eine SMO Strategie 15. Wählen Sie die SMO Taktiken weise 16. Machen Sie SMO zu einem Ihrer ProzesseAll diese Regeln zeigen, dass SMO eine Verbindung zwischen Social Media Marketingund den klassischen Online Marketing Methoden darstellt, die auf der eigenen Webseitestattfinden. Für Unternehmen bedeutet das, dass Sie alle Tools kennen sollten die zur SMOStrategie beitragen können. Für die virale Verbreitung von Nachrichten, Produkte,Webseiten usw. eignet sich z.B. der Facebook Like/Send Button und der Twitter TweetButton. Um die Conversion-Rates für einen Online Shop oder Produkt zu erhöhen solltenpositive Bewertungen zum Produkt sowie dem Online Shop vorhanden sein. Aber Vorsichtbei gekauften Bewertungen von Agenturen55, dies kann auch zu viel schlechter PR führenwie es im Jahr 2010 beim T-Online Shop der Fall war. Deswegen sollte eine SMOStrategie für Bewertungen z.B. die großen Bewertungsportale im Blick halten undversuchen die Nutzer zu überzeugen eine Bewertung abzugeben. Diese können dannanschließend in den eigenen Shop übernommen werden und mehr Sicherheit für die Käuferdarstellen.3.5.1. NewsfeedsNewsfeeds sind per RSS abonnierbare Nachrichten zu Produkten und Angeboten vonNews-Portalen oder auch E-Commerce Seiten. Hierbei werden Produkte direkt in SocialMedia Plattformen integriert und zum Kauf angeregt. Die Unternehmen Starbucks undVictoria Secret betreiben z.B. solche Feeds auf Facebook.5653 (Baker, L.: Searchenginejournal,Veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL:http://www.searchenginejournal.com/social-media-optimization-13-rules-of-smo/3734/ (Stand 08. Mai2011).)54 (Odden, L.: TopRank Online Marketing Blog,Veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL:http://www.toprankblog.com/2006/08/new-rules-for-social-media-optimization/ (Stand 08. Mai 2011).)55 http://www.spiegel.de/wirtschaft/service/0,1518,722255,00.html56 vgl. (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.16.) - 15 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce3.5.2. Deal FeedsDeal Feeds sind Newsfeeds die Nutzer nur über bestimmte Angebote zu Produkteninformieren. So kann der Nutzer nur das abonnieren, was Ihm wirklich zusagt und den Restignorieren.3.5.3. Media SharingBeim Media Sharing geht es darum bestimmte Werbemittel wie z.B. Videos & Bilder aufden dafür vorgesehenen Social Media Plattformen zu platzieren und zum einbauen auf dereigenen Webseite zu animieren57. Für Videos wären das die Plattformen YouTube58,MyVideo59, Vimeo60 etc. für Fotos und Bilder Flickr61, TwitPic62, Yigg63, Digg64 etc. Sohat es der Trinkwasserhersteller Evian geschafft sein Video nicht nur auf Youtube & Co.zu platzieren sondern auch viele Nutzer dazu gebracht das Video auf Foren, Blogs undSozialen Netzwerken zu Platzieren und mehr Reputation für die Marke zu schaffen.3.5.4. Social Media EventsSocial Media Events sind Veranstaltungen im Social Web mit dem Ziel die Reputation desUnternehmens oder einer Webseite zu steigern. Hier können verschiedene Aktionengestartet werden wie z.B. LinkBaits, Webinare, Produktvorstellungen, Design-Wettbewerbe uvm.65663.5.5. Link BuildingBeim Link Building geht es darum andere Nutzer dazu zu animieren, freiwillig Links aufdie eigenen Webseiten oder Online Shop zu setzen. Dies kann z.B. auf einem Blog, Forum,Communities, Chat oder SNE erfolgen. Durch diese Aktionen steigt die Webseite inSuchmaschinen auf höhere Platzierungen und kann mehr Kunden ansprechen.57 vgl. (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.16.)58 http://youtube.com59 http://myvideo.de60 http://vimeo.com61 http://www.flickr.com62 http://www.twitpic.com63 http://yigg.com64 http://digg.com65 vgl (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.16.)66 vgl. (Jodeleit, B.: Social Media Relations, 1. Auflage, dpunkt.Verlag, Heidelberg 2010.) - 16 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce 3.6. Social Ads & AppsBei Social Ads handelt es sich um Werbeanzeigen auf Sozialen Netzwerken. Die SocialApps stellen kleine Internetprogramme dar, die auf der eigenen Webseite eingebaut werdenkönnen und mehr Soziale Komponenten zu ermöglichen.3.6.1. Social AdvertisingSocial Advertising beschreibt das Schalten von Werbeanzeigen in SNE wie z.B. Facebook,YouTube, Blogs, Foren uvm. Twitter plant einen ähnlichen Dienst der wahrscheinlich inkürze bereitsteht.67 Facebook geht einen schritt weiter im Anzeigenmarkt. Bei Ihnen ist esmöglich Zielgruppenspezifisch Werbung einblenden zu lassen anhand der Daten aus denProfilen der Nutzer. So ist es z.B. möglich allen 18-24 Jährigen Frauen im Raum Stuttgartund die „How I Met Your Mother“ mögen Werbung einzublenden. Facebook zeigt dannauch die geschätzte Reichweite der Zielgruppe an. Weitere Filtermöglichkeiten sind: • Verbindungen auf Facebook: o Nur Personen die keine Fans von der eigenen Fanpage sind o Nur Personen die bereits Fans von der eigenen Fanpage sind o Nutzer die bereits Fans von einer bestimmten anderen Fanpage sind. • Ausbildung • Arbeitsplätze67 vgl. (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.16.) - 17 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce Abbildung 6: Zielgruppendefinition für Facebook Ads3.6.2. Social AppsSind: „Online-Applikationen oder -Widgets, die soziale Interaktion und User-Beteiligungfördern. Nike+ ist ein Paradebeispiel für eine Social App. Die Nutzer dieser komplett inein Produkt integrierten Applikation können ihre sportlichen Leistungen analysieren undmit anderen teilen.“683.6.3. Shop WidgetsShop Widgets sind schlanke und plattformunabhängige Online Shops, die in Social MediaPlattformen wie Blogs, Foren usw. eingebunden werden können. So bietet Amazon inseinem PartnerNet zu allen Produkten solche Shop Widgets. Das Ziel dieser Shop Widgets68 (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag,Hamburg 2010, S.16.) - 18 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerceist es Meinungsführer im Social Web zu überzeugen für diese Produkte zu werben69. DieVergütung läuft über ein Provisionsmodell, das dem Affiliate-Marketing gleichkommt. 3.7. F-CommerceF-Commerce ist eine Sammlung von Diensten, die in Facebook zur Verfügung stehen undviele Ansätze des Social Commerce umsetzen. Da Facebook sehr viele Dienste bereitstellt,ist ein neuer Begriff entstanden der alles vereint. Abbildung 7: F-Commerce Übersicht von www.facebookbiz.de703.7.1. Facebook Shop-LösungenHierbei werden die Online Shops in die Facebook FanPage integriert und den Nutzern dieMöglichkeit gegeben in Facebook Ihre Produkte auszuwählen und in den Warenkorb zulegen. Beim klicken auf „zur Kasse gehen“ werden die Nutzer zum angebundenen OnlineShop weitergeleitet. So hat die Produktsuche smatch.com seine gelisteten Produkte inFacebook auswählbar gemacht. Wenn man das Produkt kaufen möchte wird man zum69 vgl. siehe 4970 http://www.facebookbiz.de/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/ecosphere.png - 19 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceOnline Shop weitergeleitet. Abbildung 8: F-Commerce Social Media Store smatch.com713.7.2. Facebook Open GraphDas Open Graph Protokoll von Facebook ermöglicht es Webseiten in den Social Graph zuintegrieren. Im Moment ist es dafür entworfen worden Webseiten die eine bestimmteSache Repräsentieren wie Filme, Sportclubs, Promis und Restaurants. Der Facebook „LikeButton“ ist eines der Werkzeuge von Facebook Open Graph und ermöglicht bei klicken aufden Button all seinen Freunden zu zeigen, dass man sich gerade auf einer bestimmtenWebseite befindet oder ein bestimmte Produkt mag.72 Abbildung 9: Like Button Funktionsweise(Open Graph)7371 www.smatch.com72 vgl. (Facebook: Open Graph Protocol,Veröffentlicht im. Mai 2010 , online im Internet: URL:http://developers.facebook.com/docs/opengraph/ (Stand 22. Mai 2011).)73 http://developers.facebook.com/docs/opengraph/ - 20 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce3.7.3. Facebook CreditsEine Zahlungsmöglichkeit in Facebook sind Facebook Credits, die in Deutschland nochnicht erhältlich sind. In den USA können mithilfe einer Kreditkarte Credits gekauft und fürverschiedene Dinge in Zahlung gegeben werden. Warner Brothers hat z.B. den Film „TheDark Night“ in Facebook zum anschauen zur Verfügung gestellt. Die Bezahlungfunktioniert über Facebook Credits. Facebook beschreibt sein Produkt als: „Bei denFacebook-Gutschriften handelt es sich um eine virtuelle Währung, mit der du in vielenSpielen und Anwendungen auf der Facebook-Plattform Geschenke und andere virtuelleGüter kaufen kannst.“74Facebook Credits soll am 1. Juli als Zahlungsmittel auch in Deutschland verfügbar seinund alle anderen Zahlungsmittel verbieten. Facebook verlangt dafür 30% Provision undbietet dafür allen Entwicklern und Nutzer ein Einheitliches Zahlungsmittel. Bereits 550Anwendungen verwenden Facebook Credits.7574 (Facebook: Facebook Help Page Facebook Gutschriften,Veröffentlicht am. Mai 2011 , online imInternet: URL: http://www.facebook.com/help/new/?page=837 (Stand 22. Mai 2011).)75 (Firsching, J.: F-Commerce - Facebook als Shop Plattform, in: T3N - Social Business, 01 Juni. 2011 S.69.) - 21 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce Abbildung 10: Facebook Anwendung „The Dark Night“ gegen Facebook Credits.3.7.4. Facebook DealsSind Angebote die dem Portal Groupon76 sehr ähneln und der Social Commerce ArtGruppenkauf nachempfunden sind77.3.7.5. Facebook Check-In DealsSind Angebote die ein Nutzer mit seinem Mobiltelefon Vor-Ort einlösen kann. Dabeiwerden die Koordinaten per GPS erfasst und dem Nutzer passende Angebote in seinerUmgebung dargestellt. Sobald der Nutzer das Angebot annimmt wird es auf seinePinnwand veröffentlicht sowie auf der Fan Page des Angebot Betreibers. So erzielen die76 www.groupon.com77 Siehe Punkt 3.1.4 Gruppenkauf - 22 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceBetreiber von Fan Pages zusätzliche Reputation und zeigen anderen Nutzern dass seinFacebook Freund gerade da ist. Abbildung 11: Facebook Check-In Deals784. Strategie für die Implementierung von Social CommerceLeider gibt es bis heute keine aussagekräftigen und erfolgversprechenden Strategien fürSocial Commerce da das Thema zu neu ist. Natürlich behaupten viele Unternehmen siekönnten einen nachhaltigen ROI erzielen, die Wirklichkeit sieht leider anders aus. DieUnternehmensberatung McKinsey hat im Jahr 2009 ein Conversation Paper veröffentlichtdas 4 Schritte beschreibt im Web 2.0 Fuß zu fassen und sich auf das Web 3.0vorzubereiten. Die wesentlichen Schritte sind Zuhören, Experimentieren, Anwenden undWeiterentwickeln. Diese 4 Schritte lassen sich auch auf Social Commerce anwenden.79 4.1. Zuhören (Listen)Der erste Schritt ist zuhören was die Nutzer bereits über eine Marke oder das Unternehmensagen. Hierzu sollten Social Media Monitoring Tools verwendet werden und falls nochnicht vorhanden eine Facebook FanPage, Twitter Account sowie ein Profil auf anderengroßen Social Media Plattformen erstellt werden. All diese Plattformen sollten nunanalysiert und überwacht werden. Sobald genug Daten vorhanden sind, kann mit Hilfe vonData-Mining eine Prognose generiert werden. Nun ist es möglich zu prüfen ob die Nutzerpositiv oder negativ über das Unternehmen sprechen. Falls die Daten der Nutzer noch nicht78 https://s-static.ak.facebook.com/rsrc.php/v1/zn/r/twCsI6P8Bbg.jpg79 (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag,Hamburg 2010, S.18.) - 23 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commercevollständig sind, können auch die Social Media Aktivitäten der Konkurrenz überwachtwerden und lernen welche Fehler vermieden werden müssen. 8081 4.2. Experimentieren und Testen (Experiment)Beim Experimentieren und Testen geht es darum Ziele zu definieren, die erreicht werdenmüssen, damit Social Commerce Unternehmensweit eingesetzt werden kann. MöglicheZiele können z.B. Steigerung der Reputation des Unternehmens in Sozialen Netzwerkenund Verkaufssteigerung im E-Commerce. Es sollten keine überdimensionale Ziele definiertwerden, sondern nur kleine und erreichbare. Das bedeutet es sollte nicht sehr viel Gelddafür verwendet oder größere Instanzen oder Mitarbeiter davon überzeugt werden. Dasalles bedeutet hohen Aufwand und falls das Projekt scheitern sollte, sofort eineMeinungsbildung gegen Social Commerce. Falls die eigenen Webseiten bereits SocialMedia Funktionen besitzen, sollten diese erweitern werden auf die gesetzten Ziele. SocialMedia Guidelines sollten auch definiert werden und Aktionen und Angebote entworfenwerden, die zur Zielerreichung beitragen können. Hierzu können die Daten aus dem Schritt„Zuhören“ genutzt werden indem die Konkurrenz überwacht wurde. Fehler derKonkurrenz sollten nicht wiederholt werden.8283 4.3. Anwenden (Apply)Beim Anwenden geht es darum die Ergebnisse und Erkenntnisse aus den Punkten„Zuhören“ und„Experimentieren“ in die bestehenden E-Commerce- und Social-Media-Marketing-Strategien einzubinden. Hierbei sollte der Hauptaugenmerk darauf liegen, dassden Nutzern ein Mehrwert geboten wird. Sonst wird kein Nutzer die Funktionen, diebereitgestellt wurden nutzen. Je nachdem welches Ziel gestärkt werden soll, muss dierichtige Plattform(Facebook, Twitter, Google uvm.) und deren Social Tools(FacebookSocial Plugins, Tweet Button, Google Places/Google Base, etc.) ausgewählt werden.Längere Anmeldevorgänge und Installationen für die Nutzer sollten vermieden werden,denn diese sorgen für hohe Eintrittsbarrieren. Die Performance auf Zielerreichung muss80 vgl. (Hoffman, D.L.: McKinsey Quarterly,Veröffentlicht am:1. Juli 2009 , online im Internet: URL:https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Managing_beyond_Web_20_2389 (Stand 18. Mai 2011).)81 vgl. Siehe 7882 vgl. Siehe 7883 vgl. Siehe 79. - 24 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerceregelmäßig geprüft werden und falls die Ziele in definierten Zeiträumen nicht eingehaltenwerden können, eine Anpassung der Strategie erfolgen.84 4.4. Weiterentwickeln (Develop)Regelmäßig werden neue Social Tools veröffentlicht die eine Anpassung der Strategieerforderlich machen. Facebook veröffentlicht in regelmäßigen Abständen neue Plugins dieauf die Webseite oder in die Facebook FanPage integriert werden können. Auch andereAnbieter versuchen Facebook zu kopieren und veröffentlichen eigene Plugins, die weitereZielgruppen ansprechen können85. In Bezug auf Facebook sollte eine FanPage auf Englischgestellt werden, denn hier können viele Neuerungen schon vorab getestet werden, bevordiese in Europa zur Verfügung stehen.86 4.5. Erfolge messen in Social CommerceEine Strategie muss regelmäßig auf Ihre Performance überprüft werden. Hierzu gibt esverschiedene Kennzahlen die beim Anwenden und Weiterentwickeln von SocialCommerce Strategien wichtig sind. Ohne diese Kennzahlen weiß das Management nicht obSie auf dem richtigen Weg sind. So kann viel Geld verschwendet werden ohne einErgebnis zu erzielen.874.5.1. ROI„Der Return on Investment misst den Effekt bzw. die Wirkung von Social Media auf denUmsatz. Dabei handelt es sich um eine einfache betriebswirtschaftliche Formel: Von demdurch Social-Media-Investitionen generierten Umsatz (zuzüglich aller eingespartenKosten) werden die Investitionskosten abgezogen.“88 !"#"$% ∗ !"#$%& + !"#$!%&()!  !"#$%& − !"#$%&(" !"# = !"#$%&&("Um diesen Exakt zu ermitteln ist es wichtig Analytics Systeme zu besitzen, die messenkönnen welche „Conversion-Rate“ ein Nutzer aus Socialen Netzwerken generiert hat. AlsSocial Commerce Analytics Tool eignet sich z.B. SpinBack89 vom Unternehmen84 vgl. (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, GrinVerlag, Hamburg 2010, S.17.)85 Siehe 8386 vgl. (Hoffman, D.L.: McKinsey Quarterly,Veröffentlicht am:1. Juli 2009 , online im Internet: URL:https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Managing_beyond_Web_20_2389 (Stand 18. Mai 2011).)87 Siehe 8388 (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag,Hamburg 2010, S.18.)89 http://www.buddymedia.com/spinback - 25 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceBuddyMedia90. Mit diesem Tool ist es möglich zu vergleichen, welches Soziale Netzwerkam meisten ROI generiert, sowie zu prüfen welche die am meisten empfohlene Produktist.914.5.2. Reputation„Reputationsindizes messen nicht den wirtschaftlichen Einfluss von Social-Media-Investitionen, sondern die Veränderung der Online-Reputation, die sich aus demVerhältnis zwischen Anzahl und Wertigkeit von Nennungen im Social Web ergibt“92Hierzu gibt es 2 Kennzahlen die von Dr. Paul Marsden definiert wurden: !"##$  !"#$%&%()  !"#$%   !"# = !%  !"#$%$&  !"###$#%"# − !%!""#  !"#$%$"  !"##$#%"#  Der Wert sagt in welchem Prozentuellen Bereich die Positiven Nennungen im Vergleich zuallen anderen Nennungen stehen. !"#$%  !"  !"#$%&  !"#$% =  !"#$%&()*%"  !"#$%&  !"  !"##$#%"#  !""#$%&(  !"#!$  !"##$"%"&$(&)**"4.5.3. Reichweite„Reichweite-Metriken verwenden traditionelle Metriken aus der Medienwerbung undderen Ableitungen, um Umfang und Qualität der über Social Media erzielten Kontakte inHinblick auf die Zielgruppe zu messen. Erfasst werden eher die Kosten und weniger derGewinn.“93 !"#$%&  !"#$%  !"# = !"#$%&  !!"  !"""  ü!"#  !"#$%&  !"#$%  !"#$%&  !""!#$%&!  !"#$%&$ !"#$  !"#  !"#$"#%&%" = !"#$%&()*&+  !"  !"#$%&"%  !"#  !"#ü!"#$%&!   !"#$%&#()"  !"#  !"#$%!  !"#$%  !"#$%&"  !"  !"#"$"%. !"#$$%&%$(&$)#**+ = !"#$%&(%))%"  !"#$%&  !"#  !"#$%  !"#$%&  !"#$%  90 http://www.buddymedia.com/91 vgl. Siehe 8792 (Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag,Hamburg 2010, S.18)93 siehe 69 - 26 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce !""!#$%&!  !"#$%&((#, !"#$%&#%%()$  !"#  !"!  !"#$%&$ä!"#$%&#Fazit und AusblickSocial Commerce ist in der Entwicklung sehr weit fortgeschritten und sollte von jedem E-Commerce Unternehmen auf eine Implementierung geprüft werden. Das reine E-Commerce ist bereits über 10 Jahre alt und da die Nutzer immer mehr im Internetkommunizieren ist es nur sinnvoll sein E-Commerce System auf die soziale Komponenteausrichten. Hierzu hat Facebook viele Plug-Ins entwickelt die jedes E-CommerceUnternehmen ohne viel Aufwand integrieren. Aber auch andere Anbieter bieteninteressante Plug-Ins, dies muss in der Social Commerce Strategie anhand der Zielgruppeausgerichtet werden. Was bringt Social Commerce für E-Commerce Unternehmen?Die Antwort ist recht simpel, umso mehr Bewertungen, Empfehlungen, Reputation etc.von dem E-Commerce Unternehmen existieren umso mehr Verkäufe oder Konversionskönnen stattfinden. Was bringt Social Commerce für Kunden?Das was für Unternehmen mehr Verkäufe in Ihrem Online Shop bringt, hilft Kunden eineleichtere Kaufentscheidung zu treffen. Früher hat man einen Online Shop oft nachZahlungsbedingungen, Lieferzeit und optisches Aussehen ausgewählt. Heute werden dieOnline Shops anhand von Bewertungen und Empfehlungen ausgewählt. DieDifferenzierung kann z.B. durch Social Commerce erfolgen, die Zahlungsbedingungen wiePaypal, Kreditkarte sind Standard geworden, genau wie eine 24std. Lieferzeit. Wenn aberein Unternehmen viele Fans in Facebook, Positive Bewertungen und vieleProduktempfehlungen von Freunden generiert, schafft das Unternehmen Sicherheit beimKauf und die Eintrittsbarrieren sinken. Wie könnte es weitergehen mit Social Commerce?Eine Weiterentwicklung im Social Commerce könnte die ganzheitliche Integration vonSmartphone’s sein. Heute ist es möglich anhand von GPS bestimmte Angeboteanzunehmen. Eine weitere Entwicklung könnte sein, dass sich z.B. Facebook-Freunde inder Umgebung mobilisieren könnten, um so besondere Angebote auch im StationärenHandel zu erhalten. - 27 -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social CommerceLiteraturverzeichnis 1. Angeli, S. & Kundler, W.: Der Online Shop, Markt+Technik Verlag, München 2008, S.223 2. Baker, L.: Searchenginejournal,veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.searchenginejournal.com/social-media-optimization-13- rules-of-smo/3734/ (Stand 08. Mai 2011). 3. Bersch, A. & Firsching, J.: facebookbiz,veröffentlicht am. Februar 2011 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.facebookbiz.de/wp- content/uploads/2011/02/W3B31_Social_Networks_regelmaessige_Nutzer.jpg (Stand 1. Mai 2011). 4. Bhargava, R.: Influential Marketing Blog,veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL: http://rohitbhargava.typepad.com/weblog/2006/08/5_rules_of_soci.html (Stand 08. Mai 2011). 5. Düweke, E. & Rabsch, S.: Erfolgreiche Websites - SEO, SEM, Online Marketing, Usability, 1. Auflage, Galileo Press, Bonn n.d., 6. Dr. Marsden, P.: SOCIAL COMMERCE TODAY,veröffentlicht am. März 2010 , online im Internet: URL: http://socialcommercetoday.com/syzygy-social- commerce-report-free-download/ (Stand 6. April 2010). 7. Dr. Marsden, P.: Social Commerce: Die Monetarisierung von Social Media, 1. Auflage, Grin Verlag, Hamburg 2010, 8. Dr. Marsden, P.: SOCIAL COMMERCE TODAY,veröffentlicht am. Januar 2011 , online im Internet: URL: http://socialcommercetoday.com/social-commerce- definition-word-cloud-definitive-definition-list/ (Stand 1. Mai 2011). 9. Ebersbach, A., Glaser, M. & Heigl, R.: Social Web, 1. Auflage, UVK Verlagsgesellschaft mbH, Konstanz 2008. 10. Ebersbach, A., Glaser, M. & Heigl, R.: Social Web, 2. Auflage, UTB, Stuttgart 2010. 11. Facebook: Open Graph Protocol,veröffentlicht am. Mai 2010 , online im Internet: URL: http://developers.facebook.com/docs/opengraph/ (Stand 22. Mai 2011). - VI -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce 12. Facebook: Facebook Help Page Facebook Gutschriften,veröffentlicht am. Mai 2011 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.facebook.com/help/new/?page=837 (Stand 22. Mai 2011). 13. Firsching, J.: F-Commerce - Facebook als Shop Plattform, in: T3N - Social Business, 01 Juni. 2011 S.69. 14. Franke, S., Dr. Köhler, B., Beckar, A., Hansen, C. et al.: Social Media Prisma DE,veröffentlicht am:, online im Internet: URL: http://www.ethority.de/weblog/social-media-prisma/ (Stand 08. Mai 2011). 15. Hoffman, D.L.: McKinsey Quarterly,veröffentlicht am:1. Juli 2009 , online im Internet: URL: https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Managing_beyond_Web_20_2389 (Stand 18. Mai 2011). 16. Jodeleit, B.: Social Media Relations, 1. Auflage, dpunkt.Verlag, Heidelberg 2010. 17. Koch, M. & Richter, A.: Enterprise 2.0, 2. Auflage, Oldenbourg Verlag, München 2009. 18. Lammenett, E.: Praxiswissen Online-Marketing, 1. Auflage, Gabler | GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2009. 19. Lang, T.: Social Commerce, in: T3N 24 2011, 01 Juni. 2011 S.71-73. 20. Mühlenbeck, F. & Prof. Dr. Skibicki, K.: Verkaufsweg Social Commerce, Books on Demand, Köln 2007. 21. Odden, L.: TopRank Online Marketing Blog,veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.toprankblog.com/2006/08/new-rules-for- social-media-optimization/ (Stand 08. Mai 2011). 22. Olthuis, C.: Pronet Advertising,veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.pronetadvertising.com/articles/introduction-to-social- media-optimization.html (Stand 08. Mai 2011). 23. OReilly, T.: Was ist Web 2.0,veröffentlicht am. Januar 2011 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.oreilly.de/artikel/web20_trans.html (Stand 1. Mai 2011). Übersetzt von Patrick Holz. 24. Owyang, J.: Web Strategy,veröffentlicht am. August 2006 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2006/08/13/rules-of-social-media- optimization/ (Stand 08. Mai 2011). 25. Prof. Dr. Fischer, M.: Website Boosting 2.0, 2. Auflage, mitp, Heidelberg 2009, S.400 - VII -
    • Seminar E-Business Prozessmanagement – Social Commerce 26. Radomski, M.: Compass Heading,veröffentlicht am. März 2011 , online im Internet: URL: http://www.compass-heading.de/cms/aktuelle-nutzerzahlen- sozialer-netzwerke/ (Stand 1. Mai 2011). 27. Rausch von Traubenberg, E.: Social Media Optimization als Instrument des Online- und Suchmaschinenmarketings, Darmstadt 2008, S.8 28. Schindler, M.-C. & Liller, T.: PR im Social Web, 1. Auflage, O Reily, Köln 2011, S.28 29. Weinberg, T.: Social Media Marketing: Strategien für Twitter, Facebook & Co., Übersetzt von D. Heymann-Reder. OReilly, Köln 2010, S.4 30. Wiese, J.: allfacebook.de,veröffentlicht am. Februar 2011 , online im Internet: URL: http://allfacebook.de/zahlen_fakten/facebook-nutzerzahlen-februar-2011-15- mio-deutsche-bei-facebook (Stand 20. April 2011). - VIII -