“Dissertation” is no one’s first language (and neither is “Academic”) <br />writing with power … means getting power over ...
Michael Small @ shuttermike.com<br />
Norman Jackson, Developing Creativity Through Lifewide Education<br />
K<br />W<br />H<br />L<br />AQ<br />C<br />www.hollypester.com <br />www.123rf.com/<br />
Flourishing<br />To flourish means to live within an optimal range of human functioning, one that connotes goodness, gener...
Resilience<br />selection from Robert Boice’sHow Writers Journey to Comfort and Fluency (1994 <br />
No more “Yes, but…”<br />More of “Yes, and…”<br />
think dialectically<br />employ practical logic <br />know how (& why) you (don’t) knowengage in critical reflection<br />...
We write to work out what we think.Barbara Kamler and Pat Thomson<br />READING TO LEARN<br />WRITING TO LEARN<br />RESPONS...
Test<br />Gather Data<br />Create<br />Reflect<br />
Work<br />Out Ideas<br />Work Out Ideas<br />Work Ideas<br />One<br />
Writing to Learn: Possible Pathways<br />http://stevendkrause.com/tprw/introduction.html<br />
P romoting<br />O utstanding<br />W riting for <br />E xcellence in <br />R esearch<br />P romoting <br />O urselves<br />...
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Dissertations - Writing with Power, OR "Academic" Is No One's First Language

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  • Monkey Mind &amp; Radio KFKD– scramble for territory: you’re no good, you’re a failureWild Mind &amp; Shitty First Draft – catch a glimpse of the creative good stuff, let loose to find what you can grab hold ofFor Elbow, the phrase &apos;writing with power&apos; has two meanings. The first meaning is probably what most of us think of, when we think about writing with power : powerful writing, of course! Written words that make a difference in readers&apos; individual lives, or in the lives of entire communities. Writing with power makes us think of writing contained in such places as The Constitution, The Declaration of Independence, religious texts, classical literature, and poetry.Yet Peter Elbow emphasizes a second meaning for this phrase, and it is this second meaning:&quot;… writing with power also means getting power over yourself and over the writing process: knowing what you are doing as you write; being in charge; having control; not feeling stuck or helpless or intimidated. I am particularly interested in this second kind of power in writing and I have found that without it you seldom achieve the first kind.” (Elbow, 1998, p. viii)http://myweb.wvnet.edu/~jelkins/writeshop/writeshop/elbow.html
  • creative writing researcheris creativity - that “process of having original ideas that have value” (Ken Robinson) that is, an imaginative activity that seeks out original and assesses value. Consider then research as creative and research writing as creative writing, which does require dreaming, discovering, delivering moments, bits, sounds of ideas well before one “feels ready” to start writingAll Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and EducationNational Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education1999Norman Jackson:Paradoxically, the core enterprise of research – the production of new knowledge – is generally seen as an objective systemic activity rather than a creative activity that combines, in imaginative ways, objective and more intuitive forms of thinking.Creativity – ability to generate innovative ide3as and manifest them from thought into reality. ImaginativeOriginalCuriousResourcefulSyntheticAnalyticalCommunicative
  • WRITING AS RESEARCHER . . . is to plan for and do the work of learning yourself into inspiration: ThinkDoReflectTestCreateWriting, as all honest academics should acknowledge, is first of all reporting for work, recording regularly What You Know, What You Do Not Know and Need to Learn, and How you will Learn, Answers and Questions you are shaping and how these will lead to change. * Add C – for change to chart on slide
  • Flourish - fancy
  • Attributes of Quick Starters Start writing before they’re readyIntegrate active participation into communication practices, overall philosophies and daily practicesProactive in seeking advice from colleagues/multiple mentors, collaborators, and significant othersWork with others to establish strategies for balance among / integration across the commitments in life, work, cultural/affinity groups, and local/global communityVerbalize general optimism – about students, peers, research, teachingSpend less time in the whine and procrastination and imposter modes The New Faculty Member, 1992BoiceAdvice for New Faculty Members – “when you write daily, you start writing immediately because you remember what you were writing about the day before. This leads to impressive production. In one study participants who wrote daily wrote only twice as many hours as those who wrote occasionally in big blocks of time but wrote or revised tem times as many pages.” Be accountable to someone weekly: Boice 1989 article:Participants were divided into three groups: (a) The first group (&quot;controls&quot;) did not change their writing habits, and continued to write occasionally in big blocks of time; in 1 year they wrote an average of 17 pages; (b) the second group wrote daily and kept a daily record; they averaged 64 pages; (c) the third group wrote daily, kept a daily record, and held themselves accountable to someone weekly; this group&apos;s average was 157 pages (Boice 1989:609).
  • WRITING AS RESEARCHER . . . is resilience, a characteristic of all creatives - athletes and cooks and writers and academics alike.Resilience is action to embrace contraries – ADD ELBOW HEREResilience is discerning of Work-Life Integration and unmasking the lie of Work-Life Balance. Resilience is experiencing writing in multiple ways and at various points a day or across a research project. A resilient researcher writes steady. Resilient writing comes a word, a phrase, a sentence, a possibility at a time.STUCK PLACES – what / when are you stuck? What makes you just like the students you complain about?
  • WHINE TO WINEI am going to say &apos;yes&apos; to you, accepting whatever you have saidI will add what I want to say via &apos;and,&apos; build on what you have said  &apos;Yes and&apos; is a conversation; &apos;yes but&apos; is a conversation stopper‘I hate the beach!&apos; &apos;Yes but I really want to go the beach today!&apos; &apos;Yes, but I hate the beach!&apos;- and on to infinity.   &apos;I hate the beach!&apos; &apos;Yes, and I think the park would be a better choice!&apos; &apos;Yes, and at the park we could play baseball!&apos; ‘Yes, and the big umbrella in the trunk will keep you out of the full sun.’&apos;Yes and&apos; … opens up your mind, helps you listen, and moves you mindfully forward in creating a supportive environmentinternal conflict &amp; ambiguitysituational conflictI’d like to be able to grant your request for a day off, but we will be short-staffed that day already.This section is fine, but the rest needs to be re-workedI have had terrible experiences with that committee in the past, but it sounds like a great opportunity for you. from CK Harvard Negotiation Projectimprov comedy with ‘yes, but’ the second part differs: &apos;yes I hear you, but I don&apos;t care’The Powerful Difference Between Saying &quot;Yes And&quot; and &quot;Yes But” - by AvishParashar
  • WRITING AS RESEARCHER . . . is learning, is remembering, retrieving, recreating, reappraising, reframing, refreshing and rejection. Writing as a researcher is, therefore, adult learning.* decision-making moves between universal/specific * attends to internal features of situation for reasoning in context* operates with a conscious of own &amp; others’ ways of learning; of multiple learning modes needed situationally; and of meta-cognition as a key component* assesses match between earlier rules/practices/practical theories and emerging understandings in “interpersonal, work and political lives”
  • p.3 of Helping Doctoral Students WriteKAMLER &amp; THOMSONIdentity – scholarly and social categories narrative we tell about ourselves plural not singular – interlocking, simultaneous always in formation – not fixed continually being made and remade in and as action – multiple performances along with performances, are discursively formed – embedded in available discoursesWriting as social practice – text – the thing / performance / subject (being communicated) itself discourse practice – production, interpretation, conventions and conversations of discourse community / locaitonsociocultural practice – particular public receiving text, ways of doing &amp;selecting &amp; receiving scholarship in that community, values, &amp; valuing of group Text and Identity play differently across / because of these dimensions of discourse
  • Responding and Writing as a Supervisor is thinking first about fostering learning. Brains are rather like scrums – pillars entwined making for an extraordinary force. How can move from commentator speaking to the blank margins of learner generated text to provoker of effective next stage learning by first seeking – expecting – questions and then responding? How can you move from redline rule conveyer to engaged reader pointing to reflective and creative thinking possibilities as you ask writers to test ideas as then move into the next stages of generative thinking and writing ?and generative writing practices
  • RESPONDING AS RESEARCHER . . . Becomes a memorable journey when travelers consult both carefully sign posted routes and seek out unmarked way markers for well used, humanely paced, wisely explored and traveler endorsed byways that you will discover as you consult with others. Whether responder or one responded to: point to ideas, clarify where you read with fluency, note difficulties, ask questions – converse and comment rather than edit and redline.
  • XC this pageWhat is your process? What might it become? Why make changes now? (Boice)If writing is a process, is feedback also a process? Where and from whom might you seek feedback? At various stages how would you draw on supervisor and other readers/faculty to gather feedback, to make sense of feedback received so far?
  • WRITING AS RESEARCHER . . . Is “writing with power” which means getting over yourself and getting power over the writing processis taking charge to become comfortable and fluent as a writer by working through feeling stuck, helpless or intimidated , which means learning more ways to write and learning how you actively work to not writeis knowing this struggle is an ORDINARY part of higher levels learning Power acronym from Texas A&amp;M grad school: Promoting Outstanding Writing For Excellence in ResearchPeter Elbow quote/paraphrase from http://myweb.wvnet.edu/~jelkins/writeshop/writeshop/elbow.html
  • Dissertations - Writing with Power, OR "Academic" Is No One's First Language

    1. 1. “Dissertation” is no one’s first language (and neither is “Academic”) <br />writing with power … means getting power over yourself & over the writing process<br />- Peter Elbow, U Massachusetts-Amherst<br />
    2. 2. Michael Small @ shuttermike.com<br />
    3. 3. Norman Jackson, Developing Creativity Through Lifewide Education<br />
    4. 4. K<br />W<br />H<br />L<br />AQ<br />C<br />www.hollypester.com <br />www.123rf.com/<br />
    5. 5. Flourishing<br />To flourish means to live within an optimal range of human functioning, one that connotes goodness, generativity, growth and resilience.<br />positive affect<br />widens scope of attention<br />broadens behavioral repertoires / flexibility<br />increases intuition and creativity<br />positive impact on physical and mental health<br />“Positive Affect and Complex Dynamics of Human Flourishing” American Psychologist<br />
    6. 6. Resilience<br />selection from Robert Boice’sHow Writers Journey to Comfort and Fluency (1994 <br />
    7. 7.
    8. 8. No more “Yes, but…”<br />More of “Yes, and…”<br />
    9. 9. think dialectically<br />employ practical logic <br />know how (& why) you (don’t) knowengage in critical reflection<br />RESEARCH = LEARNING = WORK<br />
    10. 10. We write to work out what we think.Barbara Kamler and Pat Thomson<br />READING TO LEARN<br />WRITING TO LEARN<br />RESPONSES TO LEARNING<br />
    11. 11. Test<br />Gather Data<br />Create<br />Reflect<br />
    12. 12. Work<br />Out Ideas<br />Work Out Ideas<br />Work Ideas<br />One<br />
    13. 13. Writing to Learn: Possible Pathways<br />http://stevendkrause.com/tprw/introduction.html<br />
    14. 14. P romoting<br />O utstanding<br />W riting for <br />E xcellence in <br />R esearch<br />P romoting <br />O urselves<br />W riting for <br />E ngaging in <br />R esearch<br />http://www.linkedmediagroup.com/<br />
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