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Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt
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Gentrification and belonging 431 final-3.ppt

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CHSC 431: Community Assessment …

CHSC 431: Community Assessment

This Spring the students of CHSC 431: Community Assessment, a graduate-level core UIC School of Public Health class engaged in a collaborative learning experience with students and faculty at Pedro Albizu Campos Puerto Rican High School to conduct a community health assessment of Humboldt Park. The UIC SPH class of nearly 40 students broke into six groups of students to assess separate health areas identified by PACHS as important - gentrification/sense of belonging; issues of LGBTQ youth, physical activity, nutrition, young women's sexual/reproductive health, and health literacy/diabetes. Each group engaged in a mixed method
assessment modeling the assessment component of the Mobilizing Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) process typically carried out by local health departments. Each group had at least two members engaged in an ongoing community learning experience so as to better discern community perspectives with respect to their health topic. The learning experience ranged from to engaging/facilitating small group learning to facilitating a schoolwide survey to volunteer coaching of a youth sports club. Existing quantitative data on population demographics, health status and health behavior were analyzed in light of qualitative data from key informant interviews, participant observation or focus groups (debriefing groups) gathered from community engaged learning experience characterizing/contextualizing the health topic. Preliminary findings were discussed at Humboldt Park Library 4/21 and 4/28.

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  1. Forces of Change in Humboldt Park: Belonging and Gentrification CHSC 431 Spring 2010 Group 1: Youth Wellness Anne Buffington, Jenilee Candari, Shannan Chehade, Thomas Grieve, Brett Sloan, Katherine Swain
  2. Belonging and Gentrification  Assessment at two levels: ◦ Partner high school ◦ Larger HP community  How is community experience and belonging shaped by demographic housing and other trends? ◦ How does this affect health and well-being?  Contextual factors ◦ Demographic trends ◦ Income diversity ◦ Housing burden ◦ Gentrification ◦ Foreclosures ◦ Other factors
  3.  “Humboldt Park is an area of Emerging Bipolarity. The number of both high and low-income families is increasing. Fifteen of Chicago’s 77 community areas with 22% of Chicago’s population fit this pattern.” (Metro Chicago Information Center, US Census 2000 data)
  4. “Bipolar communities, in general, are places with a great deal of contested ground” Metro Chicago Information Center
  5.  “A high housing burden is defined as any household spending more than 30% of its income for rent or mortgage payments.” Metro Chicago Information Center
  6.  Many agencies working on housing issues ◦ Latin United Community Housing Association (LUCHA) ◦ Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation ◦ Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC)  Other organizations focused on maintaining strong neighborhood culture ◦ PRCC ◦ Division Street Business Development Association ◦ Humboldt Park NO SE VENDE! campaign ◦ Many others
  7.  Quantitative ◦ Youth wellness survey at partner school (n=107) ◦ Existing youth wellness data review (YRBS, CPS Student Connection survey) ◦ Analysis of existing data through real estate and housing mapping services  Qualitative ◦ Key informant interviews (n=8) ◦ Content analysis of video from partner school ◦ Participant observation: HP quarterly meeting at Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation 2/17 ◦ Participant observation: presentation of 2009 survey results at partner school 3/24
  8.  Wellness survey given to students at partner school 4/13-4/15/10 ◦ n=107  Survey originally developed and administered in 2009 by Dr. Michelle Kelley and Lynne Klasko (UIC SPH) ◦ n=104  Some questions taken from existing survey tools (YRBS, Add Health, etc), others developed specifically for partner school  Two of our group members presented findings from 2009 survey for a partnership meeting with faculty and staff
  9.  Changes to survey in 2010 ◦ Several existing questions modified in response to student feedback to 2009 survey ◦ 4 new questions submitted by other CHS 431 groups ◦ 1 LGBTQ identification question ◦ 3 questions on eating habits ◦ 2 questions on physical activity ◦ 3 new questions added per suggestion of partner school faculty/staff ◦ In school experiences of discrimination (1 question) ◦ Confidence in having tools needed to finish HS/College (2 questions) ◦ Survey reformatted/reworded
  10.  Total number of questions =81 ◦ Demographics (6 questions) ◦ School-specific questions (3) ◦ LGBTQ identification (1) ◦ Confidence in finishing high school and college (4) ◦ Stress/depression “distress measures” (6) ◦ Sleep (1) ◦ Depression (1) ◦ Flourishing measures (12) ◦ Experiences of discrimination (2) ◦ Coping strategies (10) ◦ Experience with school (6) ◦ Specific course at partner school (6) ◦ Family (4) ◦ Neighborhood (10) ◦ Extracurricular participation (1) ◦ Eating habits (3)
  11. Analytical Approach: Quantitative Analysis of Youth Survey  Specifically focused and analyzed questions pertaining to community experience and belonging on Youth Wellness Survey  Using descriptive statistics, included measures of central tendency and measures of variability about the average  Used Youth Wellness Survey 2009 to compare to 2010 ◦ Using inferential statistics to help deductions to be made from the data collected and to relate findings to the High School and Humboldt Park ◦ Cross tabulation
  12. Very Confident Somewhat Confident 2009 2010 18% 23% 77% 82%  Students report a high level of confidence that they will finish high school in 2009: 82% are very confident, and 18% are somewhat confident  In 2010, 77% of students reported a high level of confidence, and 23% of students are somewhat confident
  13. 2009 2010 12% 8% 41% 46% 47% 46%  Very similar data reported in 2009 and 2010 Very Confident Somewhat Confident Not Confident
  14. How often were you treated unfairly or with disrespect because of your race or ethnicity? No response 3% 7% 36% 17% Always Usually Sometimes 37% Never
  15. Very often (1 or more times a week) 13% Often (1 or more times a 35% month) 10% Sometimes (A few times in the past year, but not every month or every week.) 42% Never
  16.  Most research on health effects of discrimination focuses on adults  Many studies have found a strong relationship between perceived discrimination and poor mental health outcomes, including depression and anxiety  Other studies of adult populations have also linked perceived discrimination to health problems including high blood pressure, obesity, and substance use Pascoe and Richman, 2009
  17. Very often (1 or more times a week) 7% 7% Often (1 or more times a month) Sometimes (A few 12% times in the past 74% year) Never
  18. 60.00% 55.30% 50.00% 35.90% 40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 5.80% 2.90% 0.00% Strongly Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Disagree
  19. 60% 52.30% 50% 40% 30% 20% 14.30% 13.30% 20% 10% 0% Strongly Agree Disagree Strongly Agree Disagree This class specifically focused on social justice issues and concepts
  20. How often did you feel that you had experiences that challenged you to grow and become a better person? 21% No Response Every Day 28% 5% Almost Every Day 2-3 T imes a Week 17% About Once a Week 11% 1-2 a Week Never 5% 1% 29%
  21. understand my relationship to the see how I can make a postive larger society difference in my community 10.50% 20% 12% 20% 18.10% 17% 51.40% Strongly Agree Agree 51% Disagree Strongly Disagree  This question relates to a specific class that examined social justice/analysis  Over 70% of students “strongly agree” or “agreed” that their class environment helps them understand connections to a larger society and how they can make a positive impact on their community
  22. Neighborhood Experience Do you live in the Greater Humboldt Park area (Humboldt Park/Westtown)? No 64% Yes 36%
  23. Neighborhood Experience 11% 8% 6% 3% 11% 3% 3% 3% 11% 3% 14% 3% 32% Logan square Cicero Hermosa Elmwood I. Park Cragin Englewood W. Englewood Chicago Lawn Ravenswood Ridgewood Albany Park
  24. Neighborhood Experience I like living in my neighborhood: Students who live outside of HP Students who live within HP Agree Disagree Disagree 48.90% 18.20% 46.80% Agree 81.90%
  25. Neighborhood Experience My neighborhood is a good place for kids like me to grow up: Students who live outside of HP Students who live within HP Agree Disagree Agree Disagree 24% 52% 48% 76%
  26. Neighborhood Experience I worry about Puerto Ricans/Latinos moving away from my neighborhood Students who live outside of HP Students who live within HP Disagree Agree Disagree 63% 37% 44% Agree 56%
  27. Analytical Approach: Quantitative Analysis of GIS Data  Linked findings from survey and interview data to Humboldt Park using multiple GIS maps from numerous sources ◦ Everyblock.com ◦ Trulia.com ◦ Zillow.com ◦ UIC College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs (CUPPA) ◦ Citizen Law Enforcement Analysis And Reporting (CLEARMAP) ◦ CLEARpath (community level information sharing)
  28. New Construction Permits in Humboldt Park from 1/1/2005-1/1/2010 http://chicago.everyblock.com/building-permits/locations/neighborhoods/humboldt-park
  29. Humboldt Park New Construction Permits 01/01/2005 to 01/01/2010 S.F. 2 U. Undef. Temp. 3 U. 0.4% Antenna Repairs 3% 5 U. 4% Garage 0.4% 1% 6 U. Comm. Add. 8 U. 20.7% 1% S.F. 22% 9 U. 53 U. 12 U. 0.4% 15 U. 2 U. 16 U. 30 U. 3% 0.4% 18 U. 30 U. 18 U. 53 U. 0.4% Comm. 16 U. Add. 0.4% Repairs 5 U. 0.4% 3 U. Garage 15 U. 8 U. 6 U. 39% Temp. 0.4% 12 U. 9 U. 0.4% 4% 0.4% Undef. 0.4% Everyblock.com Antenna
  30. New Construction Comparison Data
  31. Current Home Foreclosures in Humboldt Park 04/18/2010 http://www.zillow.com/homes/humboldt-park-il_rb/#/homes/for_sale/Humboldt-Park- Chicago-IL/fore_lt/house,apartment_condo,duplex
  32. Humboldt Park Foreclosures: 04/18/2010 Single Family 5% 22% Condo/Apartment 73% MultiFamily
  33. Average Listing Price For Single-Family Home in Chicago http://www.trulia.com/real_estate/Humboldt_Park-Chicago/2917/market- trends/#qma_median_sales_price_chart_container
  34. Percent of homes sold at a loss
  35. Median Sales Price & Number of Sales
  36. Social Analysis Discussion at Partner High School  An afternoon assembly at the partner school where youth were encouraged to talk about their experiences concerning gentrification  A community activism group based in HP presented information about gentrification in an attempt to empower youth to get involved in their neighborhoods  Some of the activities, speeches, and dialogue among students was recorded on a 20 minute video  Each group member viewed and discussed the video
  37. Discussion Video on Gentrification “I’ve been gentrified.” “What can we do? We don’t have any money. Money talks!”  The students expressed the feeling of being invaded by outside forces, taking control over their neighborhood  Gentrification has affected students directly or indirectly ◦ Strong perceptions that white people are taking over ◦ Students having trouble with finding answers to the fundamental question of why are white people here – why are they coming to their neighborhood? ◦ Students feel the neighborhood is becoming more expensive and, consequently, less livable  Students want to be involved and take action
  38. Qualitative Analysis: Key Informant Interviews  There were eight interviews conducted by group members  Interviews were conducted with health professionals, community organizers, journalists, and educators  Seven questions covering topics concerning youth sense of belonging in reference to their community and gentrification  A non-hierarchical arrangement of codes was used for indexing data
  39. Findings: Using both Quantitative and Qualitative data  Emergent themes were used in coding Key Informant Interviews  Using mixed-methods, we found themes of: ◦ Pride ◦ Anger/Resentment ◦ Community Participation ◦ Futility
  40. Analysis of Community Leader Interviews: Themes Pride 25% 25% Anger/Resentment Participation in the Community 14% 21% Futility 15% Other
  41. Key Informant Interview Theme: Pride  “Puerto Ricans love their flag…it’s everywhere.”  “I feel free here.”  “This is the only Puerto Rican Community left in Chicago.”
  42. Key Informant Interview Theme: Anger/Resentment  “We’re not saying Humboldt Park is exclusively for Puerto Ricans…but don’t build your community here.”  “I just don't like the people who try to change the community.”  “The newcomers in the community want to immediately change everything and lock [up] all the young people hanging out.”
  43. Key Informant Interview Theme: Community Participation  “I love the events that they have that are for the community.”  “I have white neighbors and I love them because they are active in the community.”  “There are… parades and many Puerto Rican businesses and organizations that cater to the residents.”
  44. Key Informant Interview Theme: Futility  “[Humboldt park] Not for sale? Well, it’s already been sold!”  “I knew it [gentrification] would work its way over [to Humboldt Park]…it’s been slow compared to other communities”  “There are some youth that do have pride in where they live, but I do not see too many out there that help their neighbors or even pick up any trash. If you have a sense of pride in your community, then you want your community not only to be safe from violence, but also be clean. No one is telling you to clean the block, but look out for your own area.”  “The school system isn't so great and it's hard to find really good teachers these days. The days of teachers visiting a student's home are long gone. Teachers these days just come into HP to make the money and leave. It doesn't help that some parents aren't supportive about education either. Many parents did not go to college or finish high school, so the children don't have ambition to finish. Then they go to school and the teacher tells them they are stupid. Why are they going to go back if someone doesn't believe in them?”
  45. Key Informant Interviews: Other Themes and Comments  “HP has always been an immigrant neighborhood, and even when it wasn’t the Puerto Ricans, it was another immigrant group that pushed the other immigrant group out or the group chose to leave and another immigrant group took their place in Humboldt Park. This movement is different and this is why there may be such animosity because it's not an immigrant group that's moving in, but a social class and not a marginalized group, quite the opposite.”
  46. Forces and Trends  Gentrification ◦ Population and migration  Demographic changes - current predominant racial groups (Puerto Rican, Mexican, Black) moving out • 2000 Census: • White (19.4%) – 12,781 • Black (48.5%) – 31,960 • Hispanic (48.0%) – 31,607 ◦ Increase in housing prices ◦ Old houses and buildings torn down, new homes and condominiums being built
  47. Forces and Trends  Sense of belonging  Racial tension  Violence and crime  Morals and social order  Other effects on low income groups  Economy/housing crisis  Effects on youth
  48.  General Limitations • Difficulty linking health topic to larger community and relating it to the wellness survey • Much of community assessment data mostly representative of Puerto Rican and Latino/Hispanic experience with gentrification  Partnership School Limitations • Fast turn-around time with survey • Limited ability to communicate results directly back to teachers • Narrowed richness of analysis to link our overarching health topic • Minimal direct contact with students • Challenge balancing need to continue with existing survey questions for comparison purposes vs. desire to incorporate new questions or edit old ones  Quantitative Limitations • Partnership School Survey: Inability to characterize non-responders • Mapping: Different data sources and neighborhood boundary definitions  Qualitative Limitations • Limited generalizability interviews potentially not representative for true cultural competence picture • Small n values
  49.  Youth Well-Being Survey ◦ Continue to refine and administer the survey ◦ Consider administering the survey to surrounding public and other charter schools  Broader contextual landscape for challenges  Comparison data  Community/Neighborhood Experience ◦ Investigate discrepancy between survey results on students feeling at home in community but do not feel their community is a good place to grow up ◦ Build on the sense of community within the Puerto Rican community and extend the practices to the greater Humboldt Park area
  50.  Discrimination ◦ Further study the feelings/perceptions of students on being treated unfairly or disrespected within the community ◦ Themes and comments relating to partner school  Need for increased services to assist undocumented students  Increased discussion around experiences of discrimination within the school  Bipolarity/Income Diversity ◦ Further investigate ways to engage both ends of the spectrum within the community through shared activities and values towards finding common (instead of contested) ground
  51.  Well-being in Humboldt Park ◦ Increase Dialogue  Between different racial and demographic groups for higher level of participation for some level of shared community perceptions and cultural capacity ◦ Foreclosures  Further study the issues behind ¾ of all foreclosures in Humboldt Park are single-family homes
  52.  Interviewees  Pedro Albizu Campos • Beth Berendsen (Community Organizer, High School LUCHA) • Judy Diaz, Dean of Students • Juanita Garcia (Humboldt Park No Se • Matthew Rodriguez, Director Vende / PACHS) • The teachers and mentors • Elizabeth Hoffman (PACHS mentor) • The students • Maggie Martinez (President, Block Club Federation) • Chip Mitchell (Reporter, WBEZ)  UIC School of Public • • Dr. Dan Lassman (Owner, Division Dental) Bill Slavin (HP Resident) Health  Professor Jennifer Hebert-Beirne, PhD, • Raquel Torres (Tenant Organizer, MPH Bikerdike)  T.A. Rachael Dombrowski, MPH  Professor Michele A. Kelley  Lynne Klasko  David Brand  431 Colleagues

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