Compartative And Superlative Adjectives

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IDI 2.0 Schlesinger, Alejandra Yael 2009

IDI 2.0 Schlesinger, Alejandra Yael 2009

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  • 1. compartative and superlative adjectives
    GRAMMAR
    MODULE 5
    Dic./2009
    Trayecto Pre-Profesional en Inglés como Segunda Lengua
  • 2. Adjective is the word/s that describe the noun in a sentence.
    Comparative Adjective is the name for the grammar used when comparing two things.
    In the superlative you talk about one thing only and how it is the best, worst, etc. You do not compare two things.
    One-syllable adjectives.
    Form the comparative and superlative forms of a one-syllable adjective by adding –er for the comparative form and –est for the superlative.
    • Mary is tallerthan Max.
    • 3. Mary is the tallestof all the students.
  • If the one-syllable adjective ends with an e, just add –r for the comparative form and –st for the superlative form.
    • Mary's car is larger than Max's car.
    • 4. Mary's house is the tallest of all the houses on the block.
    If the one-syllable adjective ends with a single consonant with a vowel before it, double the consonant and add –er for the comparative form; and double the consonant and add –est for the superlative form.
    • My dog is bigger than your dog.
    • 5. My dog is the biggest of all the dogs in the neighborhood.
  • Two-syllableadjectives
    With most two-syllable adjectives, you form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
    • This morning is more peaceful than yesterday morning.
    • 6. Max's house in the mountains is the most peaceful in the world.
    • 7. If the two-syllable adjectives ends with –y, change the y to i and add –er for the comparative formandadd –est for the superlative.
    • 8. John is happier today than he was yesterday.
    • 9. John is the happiest boy in the world.
  • Two-syllable adjectives ending in –er, -le, or –ow take –er and –est to form the comparative and superlative forms.
    • The roads in this town are narrower than the roads in the city.
    • 10. This road is the narrowest of all the roads in California.
    THERE ARE EXCEPTIONS: Two-syllable adjectives that follow two rules. These
    adjectives can be used with-erand -est and with more and most.
  • 11. Adjectives with three or more syllables.
    For adjectives with three syllables or more, you form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
    • John is more generousthan Jack.
    • 12. John is the most generousof all the people I know.
    Irregular adjectives: Theyhave a spellingontheirown.
    • Italian food is better than American food.
    • 13. My dog is the best dog in the world.
  • ExpressingSimilitudee and Difference
    When comparing with as .. as, the adjective does not change. It can be Negative to express similitude or positive to express difference.
    NOW: Check the exercise below, complete the dialogue in a paper and then check your answers.
  • 14. SOLDIER:  Hi, mate!  Can't wait to get home.  I haven't been home for six months.SAILOR:     Well, I have been away from home much ....................... than that.SOLDIER:   Where do you live?  I live in Scotland.SAILOR:      Well, I live in Kent; it is a bit ....................... than Scotland.SOLDIER:    Have you got a girlfriend or wife? SAILOR:       Yes, I have a girlfriend who wants to marry me, but she's ....................... than me.SOLDIER:     Is she a lot ....................... than you?   SAILOR:        Oh, yes.  10 centimetres.SOLDIER:     Well my girlfriend is much ....................... than that.  In fact she is ....................... woman I know.SAILOR:      My girlfriend's very ......................., too.  Have you got a photo of your one?   SOLDIER:         Yes, here it is.   My girlfriend is ....................... girl in the world, but she is so ........................SAILOR:        She reminds me of my girlfriend, but this woman has ....................... hair.  Let me look ....................... with my glasses.   Hmmmm!   This woman is definitely as ....................... as my girlfriend!   Just a minute!  She is MY girlfriend, not YOUR girlfriend!  You're ....................... scumbag I have ever met.  Get a girlfriend of your own!SOLDIER:    Are you sure she's your girlfriend?  Is her hair as ....................... as your girlfriend's?  SAILOR:   Well, no, but she must have dyed it.  It's usually much ....................... than that.   I have always preferred blondes. SOLDIER:   Well, there you are, then.  She can't be your girlfriend - her hair's the wrong colour.SAILOR:    Maybe you're right, but she does look just like my Meg.  Sorry, mate.  Didn't mean to turn on you like that.  I'm not usually as ....................... as that.  Look, here's a photo of Meg.SOLDIER:   Yes, she does resemble my Margaret a bit, but her hair is much ....................... and she also looks ....................... in the face.  (Thinks:  You must be ....................... than you look!)SAILOR:  Yes.  You're right.  Well then, bye mate.  ....................... to have met you.SOLDIER:  Bye, mate.  (Thinks:  You must be ....................... man I have ever met!)http://www.musicalenglishlessons.org/grammar-adjectives.htm#key