Aviacion.macaya

602 views

Published on

Published in: Travel
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
602
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Aviacion.macaya

  1. 1. "Con Dos Motores, No Hay Temores"Aerovías Nacionales - early airline operations in Costa RicaADVERTISING SLOGANS are commonplace today as competing airlinesstress service, convenience, and, on occasion, special fares. In CostaRica fifty years ago the need to induce public use plus competitionover similar routes led to claims in another category: superior safety,"With two engines, there are no fears" loses its rhyme in translation,but not its message.The Curtiss Kingbird was proclaimed by Aerovías Nacionales as theideal aeroplane for Costa Rica, where mountains, jungle andrainstorms were formidable. It was designed to operate safely on asingle engine. The two motors were located so far forward and so closetogether that the loss of one altered the controllability of the aircraftonly slightly. There remained not enough power for normal operation,but sufficient to search out a landing area. Furthermore, advertisingdeclared, the bi-motor (this word was stressed) had ample power forrapid ascent from small fields, a slow landing speed, and remarkablestability. The Kingbird was the only twin-engine type in Costa Rica,and "con dos motores, no hay temores ".Román Macaya founded Aerovías Nacionales shortly after hiscelebrated flight of September-October 1933 from California to CostaRica. An engineering student who learned to fly in Oakland, Macayapurchased a Curtiss Robin with which to return to his native land. Thisaircraft (NC911K, named "Espíritu Tico") survived a hazardous journeyprolonged by poor weather. The transit of Mexico was complicated alsoby a shortage of money and some trouble with officials. Meanwhile,the "missing" tico (the nickname for Costa Ricans) aviator was gainingnotoriety in the Costa Rican press. Even after Macaya (and his non-flying companion, Paul McCarthy) were located in southern Mexico,continued poor weather in Central America caused further delay,danger and drama.Arrival in San José on 6th October 1933 was the occasion for publicceremonies that helped the suddenly famous Macaya to organize hisairline a few months later.
  2. 2. Earlier Pan American Airways had flown a few passengers up to thecapital on mail flights from its seaside base on the west coast. A fieldwas established a few miles to the west of San José, but it had suchdeficiencies as an acidic clay soil that corroded metal. La Sabana onthe outskirts of the city was a better location with superior qualities.However, the increasingly popular sport of fútbol posed a barrier inthat the land had been bequeathed to the populace for recreationaluse. Nor did many Josefinos appreciate the dawn takeoffs (to avoidstormy afternoon weather) and perceived safety problems. After muchdispute La Sabana was developed as the nations main airfield,remaining so for thirty-five years, until 1971. Today it is again arecreational area. The attractive terminal building has been convertedinto the national art museum.ENTA (Empresa Nacional de Transportes Aéreos), the first Costa Ricanairline, was already moving toward regular scheduled service whenMacaya returned. A subsidy had been secured from the legislature,amid much controversy. Aerovias Nacionales would also arguesuccessfully that it was worthy of financial aid due to servicesprovided.For a time the two rival airlines engaged in a price war-which at leastbrought new customers. But in 1935 a "Gentlemans Agreement" ondividing traffic restrained competition. ENTA waslargely North American in finance and management; hence Macayaschallenger was appropriately named. Yet foreigners were presumed tohave superior technical skills, so no nationalisticadvantage existed. Thus the need to stress the safety and efficiency ofbimotors.
  3. 3. First KingbirdThe first tico Kingbird arrived to much fanfare in May 1934. Theeight-passenger airliner replaced the "Espiritu Tico" in service, whichcarried just two.The famous Curtiss Robin was sold to another small Costa Ricanairline, EDAC (Empresa de Aerotransportes Costarricenses), with whichit was destroyed on 17th September 1936. Meanwhile more Kingbirdshad been acquired by the prospering Aerovías Nacionales.The model D-2 Kingbird was produced in 1930 for Eastern Air Trans-port, ancestor of Eastern Airlines, which purchased fourteen. Their300-h.p. Wright J6-9 engines represented a significant increase overthe 240-h.p. J6-7s (the second numeral indicated the number ofcylinders) which powered the three Curtiss D-1 Kingbirds constructedinitially.In 1935 the E.A.T. Kingbirds were replaced. Some reportedly went toTurkey, and others to SACO in Colombia. Three D-2 models were usedin Costa Rica, one acquired via LANEP (Lineas Aéreas de NicaraguaEmpresa Palazios) in Nicaragua. Aerovías Nacionales first Kingbird hadbeen a D-1 (see the fleet summary).While the unique bimotors (ENTA had single and three-engined types)were most advertised, flights often required smaller or larger aircraft.The other workhorse of Aerovías Nacionales was the Travel Air 6000.Beech Aircraft would later emerge from the company thatmanufactured this sturdy single engine type in Wichita. The two Pratt& Whitney Wasp (6000-A) models flown by the airline could log morehours between overhaul than the Wright J6-9 (6000-B) model. Thelatter was also smaller, with a 48½ ft. Wing span compared with 54 ft.For the 6000-A. Both variants performed well from the dozens of shortsemi-developed airfields used in charter flights.Three Ford Tri-motors were acquired for heavy work. Cargo to andform San Isidro de El General, an agricultural center which was anuncomfortable five-day journey from San José, was a main use.Aviation has been given much credit for development of the San Isidroregion, where the Pan American Highway was not completed until the1950s. One Ford, purchased in Los Angeles, was modified by cutting ahatch through its roof. Macayas engineering studies ensured that thestressed skin remained sufficiently strong.
  4. 4. Another Ford, plus spares, was acquired in Colombia from SACO, whenthat airline failed after the infamous collision at Medellin that took thelife of famed tango singer Carlos Gardel. The third Ford was purchasedin St. Petersburg, Florida. It was soon heavily damaged at Parrita, butflown back to San José with a bent wing and substitute landing gear.Aerovías Nacionales flew many charters. They were provided at notmuch over a cost basis, scheduled service paying the overheads.Farmers and ranchers commuted by air between their lands and SanJosé. TI-6 Curtiss Kingbird D-2. c/n. 2014Monthly JournalStarting in 1937 the airline published a monthly journal entitledRevista Agrícola-Comercial de Costa Rica. Surrounding a few articleson agricultural matters were advertisements from various businesses.But primarily it boosted the airline, which was identified on the coverby a drawing of a Kingbird and the caption "dos motores." A monthlyfeature was a description of one of the dozens of airfields available foruse and its distance and compass heading from various others.Almost daily a corpse was flown from some outlying region to San Joséfor prompt burial. Also urgent was the transport of sick and injured tomedical specialist in the capital. A period of high charter demandwould occur whenever heavy rains washed out the railway track toLimón. Many extra hours had to be flown to connect San José with theAtlantic port.
  5. 5. Private cargo was shipped at fixed rates. Unpaid freight werenewspapers carried to outlying points, as a means to justify thesubsidy paid by the Government. Group charter flights were offered in1938, due to the acquisition of a twelve-passenger Stinson Model Utrimotor. Propaganda in the Revista showed such groups as aSalvadoran female basketball team and a theatrical company flyingAerovías Nacionales to Nicaragua. During 1938 the airline carried 438passengers to Managua and 9,400 lb. of freight.Every Thursday the radio-equipped Stinson left San José at 6:20 a.m.,arriving at Managua at 8:30. The return flight was prompt, reachingSan José at 11:30. The precise course varied; usually the weather wasdifferent on either side of the mountains and either a western oreastern route was followed.Daily scheduled flights from San José went westward to several citiesin Guanacaste province, the port of Puntarenas and the south-westernplantation area of Parrita. The far south, near the Panamanian border,was served on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Limón had only twoflights per week when the train was running. All schedules were set forthe morning, before the tropical storminess of the afternoon. Timing ofservice to Quepos varied according to the tide, allowing beachlandings. CR-5 Curtiss Kingbird D-1
  6. 6. Smaller aircraftSeveral small aircraft were obtained or specialized work. Express tripscould be arranged at short notice to many places. The Revista ofAugust 1938 advertised a new Rearwin Sportster for use to smallprivate airfields. Dr. Gonzalo Cubero soon acquired this aircraft,becoming the first sport flier in Costa Rica. Earlier a cabin Wacowrecked at Puerto Cabezas in Nicaragua was purchased from theGuardia Nacional of that country. It was rebuilt in Managua by awoodworker formerly employed by Steinway Piano in New York. AStinson Reliant was brought by Enrique Malek, who flew for AerovíasNacionales after the demise of his own airline in Panama.Aerovías Nacionales was prospering by 1939, but the end of itsoperations was at hand. The entry of TACA (Transportes Aéreos CentroAmericanos) into Costa Rica brought the overwhelming competition ofan airline which had expanded through most of Central America fromits base in Honduras. While cargo had formed the basis of TACAssuccess, new Lockheed 14 airliners enabled it to offer a superiorpassenger service with international connections. Even the merger ofENTA and Aerovías Nacionales couldnt forestall their inevitable sale toTACA in 1940. The experienced personnel more than the worn aircraftwere valuable assets.In the six years of its existence Aerovías Nacionales had a perfectsafety record while serving the scattered population of Costa Rica in avariety of ways appropriate to an era prior to general roadconstruction. Román Macaya, retired in San José, is particularly proudof his mechanics, who were as much responsible for safe operation ashis pilots. San José eventually became an international center foraircraft maintenance. TACA shifted its repair shops from Tegucigalpa in1943. SALA (Servicio Aeronautico Latinoamericano) was created in1949, as TACA dissolved. COOPESA (Cooperativa de Servicios Aero-Industriales) was created in 1963 by reorganization.Several patched and weary Kingbirds flew on briefly for TACA in1940, but they were soon replaced by modern bimotors. But thetradition of safe air service had been established for the populace ofCosta Rica, who had heard for years that "con dos motores, no haytemores."
  7. 7. Sources: Interviews with Román Macaya and Rodolfo Ulloa. U.S. CivilAircraft, Juptner; Historia de la aviación en Costa Rica, Jiménez;Central America and the Caribbean Civil Aircraft Registers, Air-Britain.PARTIAL FLEET LISTEarly registration records in Costa Rica have disappeared. Thefollowing list is compiled from various fragments of evidence. Additionsare welcome.Regn. Type/RemarksCurtiss Robin C-1, c/n 608, ex NC911K. named "Espíritu Tico"CR-5 Curtiss Kingbird D-1, ex NC374NTI-6 Curtiss Kingbird D-2. c/n. 2014, ex NC628V, CR-6TI-8 Curtiss Kingbird D-2, c/n. 2003, ex NC588NTI-16 Curtiss Kingbird D-2, ex AN-?TI-18 Travel Air 6000-BTI-19 Travel Air 6000-8TI-24 Travel Air 6000-A, ex RX-?TI-25 Curtiss Kingbird, unconfirmed regn.TI-29 Rearwin 6000-M Speedster, c/n. 310, to CuberoTI-34 Stinson Model U, c/n. 9023, ex NC12196TI-40 Ford Tri-motorTI-41 Ford Tri-motor, c/n. 5-AT-78TI-42 Ford Tri-motor, c/n. 71, ex NC412HWaco Cabin model, Jacobs engine, from G.N. de NicaraguaStinson Reliant, ex FtX-Travel Air 6000-A
  8. 8. About the Author:Dr. Gary Kuhn, is a professor of History at the University of Wisconsinat LaCrosse. He has published many articles in scholarly journals(American Neptune, North Dakota Quarterly, Revista del PensamientoCentroamericano -Managua- and Repositorio -San Salvador-).He has traveled extensively through Central America. His scholarlyinterests include nineteenth-century Central America, and LatinAmerican aeronautical history. He is also an accomplished Bridgeplayer.LAAHS is proud to have him publishing his article with us, and we hopefor his continued participation and cooperation with us, for many yearsto come.
  9. 9. ANTECEDENTES HISTÓRICOS DE LA DIRECCIÓN GENERAL DEAVIACIÓN CIVILFue a principios del siglo XX que se inicia en Costa Rica la operacióndel Transporte Aéreo, con la llegada del primer avión que llegódesarmado al puerto de Limón el 1° de enero de 1912, el cual fue elprimero en cruzar al cielo centroamericano; le siguió un aeroplanoBlériot piloteado por Jesse Seligman, recorriendo cerca de 7.000metros en el Llano Grande de Mata Redonda.Mediante la Ley No. 36 del 22 de noviembre de 1928 que aprobó elprimer convenio Iberoamericano de Navegación Aérea. Realizándose elprimer vuelo comercial de transporte de pasajeros el 29 de diciembrede 1928, con una Aeronave de Pan American del tipo Sircosky, la cualaterrizó en la Sabana.El 17 de enero de 1929 se firmó el primer contrato bajo referendo delCongreso, con la línea PANAMERICAN y la Secretaría de Fomento, lacual quedó autorizada a prestar servicios de carga, pasajeros y correopor 10 años, al nivel Local e Internacional entre estados Unidos, CostaRica y la Zona del Canal de Panamá.Este compromiso obligó al estado costarricense a crear las facilidadespara desarrollar la infraestructura aeronáutica como: pistas deaterrizaje, edificios, hangares, talleres y otros. El 13 de noviembre de1929, con el Decreto No.19 (ver anexo 3), se creó la Dirección Generalde Aviación Civil, adscrita a la Secretaría de Seguridad Pública con lasiguiente motivación:"Se hace indispensable la existencia de un Departamento en laAdministración que tome a su cargo todo lo relacionado con el recibo ydespacho de naves aéreas, así como dictar reglamentos ydisposiciones convenientes para el debido control y correctofuncionamiento del tráfico aéreo"El 2 de marzo de 1932 inició sus operaciones la primera empresa localde transporte aéreo: Empresa Nacional de transporte Aéreo (E.N.T.A)mediante un contrato realizado con el Gobierno de Costa Rica para elTransporte de carga y personas a un nivel local; la cual se establecióen Costa Rica para operar en los lugares: Limón, San Isidro delGeneral, Puntarenas y Liberia.
  10. 10. En 1933 se fundó la empresa Aerovías Nacionales, para operar a nivellocal; la cual permitió con E.N.T.A, puesto que para esa épocaPANAMERICAN abandonó la explotación local para dedicarse solo altransporte aéreo internacional.El 7 de agosto de 1934 entró en vigencia la Ley No. 152 la cual declaróde utilidad pública; todas aquellas áreas necesarias para la creación deaeropuertos, concediendo estos terrenos a las municipalidades, eneste caso los aeródromos establecidos en Santa Ana y en la Sabana.Durante este período se elaboró el primer Reglamento de Aviación Civilrespetando las convenciones internacionales que regulaban estamateria.El 30 de abril de 1937, el Gobierno decidió construir el AeropuertoInternacional de la Sabana, el cual fue inaugurado oficialmente el 7 deabril de 1940, constituyéndose este en uno de los primeros hitos parael desarrollo de la aviación en Costa Rica.El 16 de enero de 1939 mediante la fusión de E.N.T.A y AerovíasNacionales, nace el consorcio ENTA-AEROVIAS, que posteriormentefue adquirido por la empresa Transportes Aéreos Centroamericanos(TACA). Dicha empresa mantuvo el monopolio de los servicios aéreoslocales durante casi una década.
  11. 11. Lindberg Hace 82 AñosPosted on June 15, 2012A inicios de 1912, llega al país, vía Puerto Limón, el primer avión. Estellego desarmado y se convertiría en el primer aparato en surcar loscielos de nuestra Centroamérica.El piloto Jesse Seligman, sería el primer piloto en volar en Costa Rica,recorrió unos 7 kilómetros volando en un aeroplano Blériot, en LlanoGrande Mata de Plátano. Seligman da los primeros espectáculosaéreos en Costa Rica y cobraba ¢ 1.500 a cada pasajero.Historia Aeronautica Costarricense (1912 – 1973)En 1915, el herediano Tobías Bolaños se convierte en el primer pilotocostarricense. Formaba parte del ejercito de Francia. El actualaeropuerto de Pavas, inaugurado en 1975 como AeropuertoInternacional, lleva su nombre.A finales de 1920 llegaron en dos aviones Ansaldo, los pilotos JoséVilla y Luis Venditti. Pretendieron en 1921 realizar el primer vuelointernacional hacia Managua, pero por condiciones del tiempo nopudieron realizarlo. Terminaron aterrizando de nuevo en Limón,después de muchos contratiempos.En febrero de 1928, el aviador Charles Lindbergh, primero en volar através del Atlántico sin escalas, llega a Costa Rica, a bordo de su aviónThe Spirit of Saint Louis.El primer vuelo comercial de transporte de pasajeros se dá el 29 dediciembre de 1928, lo realizó la norteamericana Pan American con unaaeronave del tipo Sircosky, la cual aterrizó en La Sabana.En 1929 se autoriza a Pan American a volar al país desde EEUU yPanamá, específicamente a la zona del Canal.Sin embargo, el país no contaba con la infraestructura necesaria pararecibir vuelos y albergar a las naves, ni tampoco con la legislaciónnecesaria para tales efectos, por lo que, en 1929, se creó la DirecciónGeneral de Aviación Civil, que se encarga desde entonces de todo loconcerniente al tráfico aéreo en el país.
  12. 12. En 12 de abril 1931, Cleto González Víquez, Presidente de laRepública, inaugura el primer Aeropuerto Internacional en Lindora deSanta Ana, con la llegada de un Ford Trimotor de Pan American.Para marzo de 1932 comienza a operar la Empresa Nacional detransporte Aéreo (E.N.T.A), primer empresa aérea costarricense,fundada por C.N. Shelton y Bob Forsblade, la cual transportabapersona y carga a Limón, San Isidro del General, Puntarenas y Liberia.En 1933 Román Macaya, a bordo de un avión Curtiss Robin, bautizado“El Espíritu Tico”, realiza junto a su compañero Paul McCarthy, elprimer vuelo desde San Francisco, California a Costa Rica, a dondellegó el 06 de octubre de ese mismo año.Macaya funda en 1934 la empresa Aerovías Nacionales, que realizabavuelos nacionales.El 20 de junio de 1937, ocurre el primer accidente grave de aviaciónen el país, cuando el TI-3 Curtiss Travelair de la ENTA, se estrelló en elCerro Las Vueltas. Fallecen el piloto y sus cinco pasajeros. Los restosfueron encontrados hasta 1941.Para 1939, E.N.T.A y Aerovías Nacionales se fusionan en un consorciollamado ENTA-AEROVÍAS, que posteriormente sería adquirido porTransportes Aéreos Centroamericanos (TACA).El 7 de abril de 1940, fue inaugurado oficialmente el AeropuertoInternacional de la Sabana.El 16 de octubre de 1945, se crea la empresa Líneas AéreasCostarricenses S.A. (LACSA) con aportes del Estado, Pan American yotros socios particulares. Pero será hasta 1948, que la compañíaobtiene permisos para realizar vuelos internacionales, a dársele laautorización para volar como Compañía Aérea de Bandera Nacional.Inicia operaciones en 1946 con 3 aviones DC-3. Eran los TI 16, TI 17 yTI 18. LACSA uso este tipo de aviones hasta 1971.EL 26 de noviembre de 1946, LACSA sufre su primer accidente aéreo,cuando un DC-3 RX-76, arrendado a COPA, se estrellar contra el cerroEl Cedral en Santa Ana, En él, perecieron sus 20 pasajeros y los dospilotos.Ya en 1949, KLM volaba a Europa desde La Sabana con aviones DC-3.
  13. 13. En octubre de 1949, se publica en la Gaceta, la que se considera laprimera Ley General de Aviación Civil de carácter nacional, que definetodo lo referente al transporte aéreo y crea la Dirección General deAviación Civil.Para la década del 50, son evidentes las deficiencias del aeropuerto deLa Sabana y el tráfico aéreo comienza a mostrar un marcadocrecimiento, lo que obliga al gobierno a buscar soluciones paraconstruir un nuevo aeropuerto.Se define que por sus características y condiciones, el aeropuertodebería instalarse en las afueras de la ciudad de Alajuela, para lo cual.se declara como zona reservada para fines de utilidad y necesidadpública, unos terrenos ubicados al sur de dicha ciudad.Inaugurado el 2 de marzo de 1958, como Aeropuerto El Coco, recibíaaeronaves grandes con DC-6 y Convair 340.En noviembre de 1960 llega a El Coco, el TI-1017, un Douglas DC-6AB, primer cuatrimotor de LACSA, con capacidad para el transportede 63 pasajeros y carga. Y para marzo del 62 llega el primer jet anuestro país, un DC-8, el N804PA, “Midnight Sun, de Pan American.Lacsa tendría su primer jet hasta 1967, un BAC 1-111 400, TI-1056C,bautizado “El Tico”En 1963 y tras la quiebra de la empresa SALA (Servicios AeronáuticosLatinoamericanos SA), propiedad de TACA, nace la Cooperativa deServicios Aéreo Industriales R.L. (COOPESA), con la finalidad desuministrar el servicio de mantenimiento y reconversión de aeronaves,que durante años a mantenido estandares de calidad muy altos a nivelinternacionalEn los años siguientes se actualiza la Ley General de Aviación Civil(No.762, nace el Consejo Técnico de Aviación Civil dependiente al igualque la Dirección General, del Ministerio de Obras Públicas yTransportes, a la cual se le autoriza a percibir directamente los fondosprovenientes de tarifas, ventas o derechos aplicables a los servicios oinstalaciones aeroportuarias.En 1971, El Coco es rebautizado como “Aeropuerto Internacional JuanSantamaría”, en honor al héroe nacional del país
  14. 14. La actual Ley General de Aviación Civil No. 5150, se promulgó el 14 demayo de 1973.
  15. 15. Lindberg Hace 82 AñosPosted on June 15, 2012A inicios de 1912, llega al país, vía Puerto Limón, el primer avión. Estellego desarmado y se convertiría en el primer aparato en surcar loscielos de nuestra Centroamérica.El piloto Jesse Seligman, sería el primer piloto en volar en Costa Rica,recorrió unos 7 kilómetros volando en un aeroplano Blériot, en LlanoGrande Mata de Plátano. Seligman da los primeros espectáculosaéreos en Costa Rica y cobraba ¢ 1.500 a cada pasajero.Historia Aeronautica Costarricense (1912 – 1973)En 1915, el herediano Tobías Bolaños se convierte en el primer pilotocostarricense. Formaba parte del ejercito de Francia. El actualaeropuerto de Pavas, inaugurado en 1975 como AeropuertoInternacional, lleva su nombre.A finales de 1920 llegaron en dos aviones Ansaldo, los pilotos JoséVilla y Luis Venditti. Pretendieron en 1921 realizar el primer vuelointernacional hacia Managua, pero por condiciones del tiempo nopudieron realizarlo. Terminaron aterrizando de nuevo en Limón,después de muchos contratiempos.En febrero de 1928, el aviador Charles Lindbergh, primero en volar através del Atlántico sin escalas, llega a Costa Rica, a bordo de su aviónThe Spirit of Saint Louis.El primer vuelo comercial de transporte de pasajeros se dá el 29 dediciembre de 1928, lo realizó la norteamericana Pan American con unaaeronave del tipo Sircosky, la cual aterrizó en La Sabana.En 1929 se autoriza a Pan American a volar al país desde EEUU yPanamá, específicamente a la zona del Canal.Sin embargo, el país no contaba con la infraestructura necesaria pararecibir vuelos y albergar a las naves, ni tampoco con la legislaciónnecesaria para tales efectos, por lo que, en 1929, se creó la DirecciónGeneral de Aviación Civil, que se encarga desde entonces de todo loconcerniente al tráfico aéreo en el país.
  16. 16. En 12 de abril 1931, Cleto González Víquez, Presidente de laRepública, inaugura el primer Aeropuerto Internacional en Lindora deSanta Ana, con la llegada de un Ford Trimotor de Pan American.Para marzo de 1932 comienza a operar la Empresa Nacional detransporte Aéreo (E.N.T.A), primer empresa aérea costarricense,fundada por C.N. Shelton y Bob Forsblade, la cual transportabapersona y carga a Limón, San Isidro del General, Puntarenas y Liberia.En 1933 Román Macaya, a bordo de un avión Curtiss Robin, bautizado“El Espíritu Tico”, realiza junto a su compañero Paul McCarthy, elprimer vuelo desde San Francisco, California a Costa Rica, a dondellegó el 06 de octubre de ese mismo año.Macaya funda en 1934 la empresa Aerovías Nacionales, que realizabavuelos nacionales.El 20 de junio de 1937, ocurre el primer accidente grave de aviaciónen el país, cuando el TI-3 Curtiss Travelair de la ENTA, se estrelló en elCerro Las Vueltas. Fallecen el piloto y sus cinco pasajeros. Los restosfueron encontrados hasta 1941.Para 1939, E.N.T.A y Aerovías Nacionales se fusionan en un consorciollamado ENTA-AEROVÍAS, que posteriormente sería adquirido porTransportes Aéreos Centroamericanos (TACA).El 7 de abril de 1940, fue inaugurado oficialmente el AeropuertoInternacional de la Sabana.El 16 de octubre de 1945, se crea la empresa Líneas AéreasCostarricenses S.A. (LACSA) con aportes del Estado, Pan American yotros socios particulares. Pero será hasta 1948, que la compañíaobtiene permisos para realizar vuelos internacionales, a dársele laautorización para volar como Compañía Aérea de Bandera Nacional.Inicia operaciones en 1946 con 3 aviones DC-3. Eran los TI 16, TI 17 yTI 18. LACSA uso este tipo de aviones hasta 1971.EL 26 de noviembre de 1946, LACSA sufre su primer accidente aéreo,cuando un DC-3 RX-76, arrendado a COPA, se estrellar contra el cerroEl Cedral en Santa Ana, En él, perecieron sus 20 pasajeros y los dospilotos.
  17. 17. Ya en 1949, KLM volaba a Europa desde La Sabana con aviones DC-3.En octubre de 1949, se publica en la Gaceta, la que se considera laprimera Ley General de Aviación Civil de carácter nacional, que definetodo lo referente al transporte aéreo y crea la Dirección General deAviación Civil.Para la década del 50, son evidentes las deficiencias del aeropuerto deLa Sabana y el tráfico aéreo comienza a mostrar un marcadocrecimiento, lo que obliga al gobierno a buscar soluciones paraconstruir un nuevo aeropuerto.Se define que por sus características y condiciones, el aeropuertodebería instalarse en las afueras de la ciudad de Alajuela, para lo cual.se declara como zona reservada para fines de utilidad y necesidadpública, unos terrenos ubicados al sur de dicha ciudad.Inaugurado el 2 de marzo de 1958, como Aeropuerto El Coco, recibíaaeronaves grandes con DC-6 y Convair 340.En noviembre de 1960 llega a El Coco, el TI-1017, un Douglas DC-6AB, primer cuatrimotor de LACSA, con capacidad para el transportede 63 pasajeros y carga. Y para marzo del 62 llega el primer jet anuestro país, un DC-8, el N804PA, “Midnight Sun, de Pan American.Lacsa tendría su primer jet hasta 1967, un BAC 1-111 400, TI-1056C,bautizado “El Tico”En 1963 y tras la quiebra de la empresa SALA (Servicios AeronáuticosLatinoamericanos SA), propiedad de TACA, nace la Cooperativa deServicios Aéreo Industriales R.L. (COOPESA), con la finalidad desuministrar el servicio de mantenimiento y reconversión de aeronaves,que durante años a mantenido estandares de calidad muy altos a nivelinternacionalEn los años siguientes se actualiza la Ley General de Aviación Civil(No.762, nace el Consejo Técnico de Aviación Civil dependiente al igualque la Dirección General, del Ministerio de Obras Públicas yTransportes, a la cual se le autoriza a percibir directamente los fondosprovenientes de tarifas, ventas o derechos aplicables a los servicios oinstalaciones aeroportuarias.
  18. 18. En 1971, El Coco es rebautizado como “Aeropuerto Internacional JuanSantamaría”, en honor al héroe nacional del paísLa actual Ley General de Aviación Civil No. 5150, se promulgó el 14 demayo de 1973.
  19. 19. Aerovias Nacionales Costa Rica –MacayaCosta Rica (1934– 1940). After returning home from the U.S. onOctober 5, 1933 with a new Curtiss Robin christened Espiritu Tico,Roman Macaya, enjoying the backing of Guanacaste province, foundsAN-Macaya on January 20, 1934. Although unable to win governmentsubsidy, Macaya begins flying regularly scheduled services out of SanJuan on July 3 using the Robin and a new Curtiss Kingbird. Later in theyear, the company takes delivery of a Stinson Model U, purchasedfrom William Randolph Hearst.On May 30, 1935, Macaya and Eric Murray, CEO of rival ENTA(Empresa Nacional de Transportes Aereos, S.A.), agree to rationalizetheir services, avoiding unnecessary route duplication and offering aunified fare structure. AN-Macaya, in 1936–1937, is flying to a varietyof destinations, including Tempisque, Santa Cruz, Liberia, Nicoya,Puntarenas, Ciudad Quesada, San Ramon, San Jose, Limon, San Isidrode el General, Buenos Aires, and Puerto Cortes.The Espiritu Tico, leased to EDAC (Empresa de AerotransportesCostarricenses, S.A.), is destroyed in a crash on September 7 of theformer year. In addition to the Model U, the fleet grows to also includea number of Travel Air 6000s.During 1938–1939, the large domestic network is maintained. TheFord Tri-Motor 5-AT-19 is purchased from Mulzer Flying Services ofColumbus, Ohio, in March of the latter year. It is followed by a secondTri-Motor, the Ford 5-AT-78, which arrives on October 1; purchasedfrom the Phillips Petroleum Company for $5,000, it is remembered forits outsized and nonstandard balloon tires. In these years, Eric Murrayand Roman Macaya lay plans to sell out to Lowell Yerex’s Hondurancarrier TACA (Transportes Aereos Centros Americanos, S.A.), whichbegins flying into San Jose on October 20 of the latter year.The first outward step is taken on January 16, 1940 when ENTA(Empresa Nacional de Transportes Aereos, S.A.) and AN-Macaya aremerged into Aerovias Nacionale de Costa Rica, S.A.
  20. 20. On June 20, the government cancels the airmail contracts held by theMurray/Macaya operation, but on October 20, TACA (TransportesAereos Centro Americanos, S.A.) absorbs the newly amalgamatedcarrier as Compania Nacional TACA de Costa Rica, S.A. and receivesthe government mail subsidies formerly held by the two independents.

×