Best practices for live streaming
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Best practices for live streaming

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Best practices for live streaming Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Presented by: Best Practices for Live Streaming
  • 2. I. Live video workflow II. Ten tips for a successful live streamed event
  • 3. One-to-many live streaming
  • 4. One-to-many live streaming This workflow and presentation are for one-to-many live streaming, sometimes referred to as “over the top” or OTT streaming. We’re not discussing here:  Secure internal streaming  Two-way videoconferencing, like Skype  Point-to-point video file transfer for re-broadcast This presentation is about streaming directly to consumer viewers watching on desktops, mobile devices, connected TVs, etc.
  • 5.  Live video workflow
  • 6. Delivering live video -- workflow Video Signal SDI output from a video switcher is pictured here, but this could be any video source, such as  Built in webcam  USB webcam  Analog, HDMI, or SDI Camera  Output of video switcher
  • 7. Delivering live video -- workflow Live EncoderVideo Signal h.264 AAC Encoders can be either software or hardware. The main purpose of the encoder is to take the uncompressed video signal and convert it to h.264 / AAC at a bitrate that can be easily streamed over your internet connection.
  • 8. Live video encoding workflow  Encoder Encoding settings Bandwidth Streaming server CDN Multiscreen delivery
  • 9. Live streaming encoders Budget: $0 Software encoders, run on Mac or Windows Ustream Web Broadcaster Ustream Producer (Free version) Adobe FMLE
  • 10. Live streaming encoders Budget: $500 - $1,000 Ustream Producer Pro and Studio Wirecast Teradek VidiU
  • 11. Live streaming encoders Budget: $5,000 - $40,000 NewTek TriCaster Elemental Live Cambria Live
  • 12. Live video encoding workflow Encoder  Encoding Settings Bandwidth Streaming server CDN Multiscreen delivery
  • 13. Recommended settings Quality Resolution Video bitrate HD 1280 x 720 2 Mbps High 960 x 540 1.5 Mbps Medium 640 x 360 1 Mbps Low 480 x 270 400 kbps
  • 14. Delivering live video -- workflow Live Encoder Video Signal h.264 AAC RTMP Internet Connection
  • 15. Live video encoding workflow Encoder Encoding Settings  Bandwidth Streaming server CDN Multiscreen delivery
  • 16. Upload, not download speed is what matters.  For HD, at least 3Mbps  Example above shows a typical residential grade internet connection, not enough upload speed for HD streaming.  Low quality streaming can be done on as little as 600kbps How much bandwidth do I need?
  • 17. Recommended settings Quality Resolution Video bitrate Recommended Bandwidth HD 1280 x 720 2 Mbps 4Mbps High 960 x 540 1.5 Mbps 3Mbps Medium 640 x 360 1 Mbps 2Mbps Low 480 x 270 400 kbps 1Mbps  Recommended bandwidth is 2X the bitrate you plan to stream at.  Higher quality streaming requires higher bitrates and greater bandwidth.
  • 18. Delivering live video -- workflow Live Encoder Streaming Server Video Signal h.264 AAC RTMP
  • 19. Live video encoding workflow Encoder Encoding Settings Bandwidth  Streaming server CDN Multiscreen delivery
  • 20. Ingest / streaming server Self hosted vs cloud-based streaming service Self-hosted  Viewers connect directly to your server, can only support a small number of simultaneous connections  Doesn’t have additional features like recording files for VOD, transcoding, etc.  Isn’t an end-to-end solution, still need to build a player, connect with CDN, etc.  Will require a lot of setup and configuration. Our recommendation is don’t try to do it yourself! Use a service like Ustream.
  • 21. Delivering live video -- workflow Live Encoder Streaming Server CDN Video Signal Viewers h.264 AAC RTMP
  • 22. Live video encoding workflow Encoder Encoding Settings Bandwidth Streaming server  CDN Multiscreen delivery
  • 23. Live video platform including CDN (Content Delivery Network)  Important if you plan to have an audience of any size.  Ensures scalability, reliability, optimized load and buffer times.  Offers additional capabilities like cloud transcoding, instant availability of VOD, analytics about who watches, security options.
  • 24. Delivering live video -- workflow Live Encoder Streaming Server CDN Video Signal Viewers h.264 AAC RTMP
  • 25. Live video encoding workflow Encoder Encoding Settings Bandwidth Streaming server CDN  Multiscreen delivery
  • 26. Multiple format and bitrate delivery 480 360 240 720 Audio Only Multi Bitrate HTTP via Flash / Silverlight Multi Bitrate HLS 480 360 240 720 H.264 video AAC audio
  • 27. One in, many out model – cloud transcoding RTMP Servers HLS Servers 480 360 240 720Single Bitrate RTMP 720 or 1080 Audio Only Multi Bitrate RTMP or HTTP Multi Bitrate HLS 480 360 240 720
  • 28. Why transcode in the cloud?  Less bandwidth needed at the origin of the stream Only need sufficient bandwidth to send a single high-bitrate stream, not bandwidth for 4-10 streams of various formats and bitrates  Less encoding power and complexity at the origin of the stream Can stream HD to all devices, even with free software  Takes the guesswork out of encoder configuration Only need to worry about specs for one stream in one format
  • 29. Live video encoding workflow  Ten tips for a successful live streamed event
  • 30. 1. Test early and test often Test  with the actual gear  from the actual location  with the actual subject matter
  • 31. Test early and test often (continued…)  End-to-end tests are best  Test on-site with your actual bandwidth and your actual source signal  Test with moving images from live cameras  Test audio sync  Watch your test on all end user devices (desktop, iPads, set top boxes, etc)  Check for any firewalls that could block streaming or viewing  Monitor throughout live event
  • 32. 2. Know your upload bandwidth  speedtest.net – don’t believe what someone told you the bandwidth might be, you need to test it yourself and test it multiple times.  Simply put, more bandwidth is better, but its also about the quality of the pipe:  dedicated bandwidth  as few hops as possible from encoder to ingest server  maximum headroom -- most encoders are variable bitrate, sending as much as 2x over the “target bitrate”
  • 33. 3. Have great lighting The first secret to a great live stream is great lighting  With a poorly lit scene, your camera will introduce noise into the video picture  This noise is amplified by the video encoding process, resulting in a low-quality, VHS-like image
  • 34. 4. Have great audio The second secret to a great live stream is great audio.  A presentation that you can’t see but can hear is valuable  A presentation that you can see but can’t hear is useless  Get a direct feed from the PA system, the on-board mic on the camera will not pick up a sufficient signal Don’t skimp on audio!
  • 35. 5. Long form content works best for live  Forget what you’ve heard about web video needing to be 2-3 minutes long.  While short form might work well for VOD, live streams less than 20 minutes long will have a hard time attracting an audience. The longer you can stream, the bigger of an audience you will attract.
  • 36. 6. Create a landing page for your event  This isn’t traditional TV where people know where to find the channel.  Create a page that makes it clear this is where people are supposed to watch.  Have content inside and around the player with the context of the event. Schedules, background information, calls to action.  The Ustream channel page lets you do this, or if you are creating your own page and embedding the Ustream player, make sure you have these elements.
  • 37. 7. Promote your event Promote your event at least three different times and in at least 3 different ways.  One week before, one day before, one hour before, 5 minutes before live  Use email, social media, pre-registration and call attendees  Make sure any influential or high profile participants tweet it from their personal accounts
  • 38. 8. Make it interactive This isn’t network TV. Take advantage of the flexibility of this unique medium.  Consider behind-the-scenes, interactive chats / Q&A with real-time questions from the audience via Twitter, and shoulder content  Stream as long as possible. Longer streams gain a larger audience and help to generate more social media buzz.
  • 39. 9. Go live early Start your stream 15-60 minutes early.  Allows you time to make sure everything is working correctly end- to-end  Viewers will show up early and start spreading the word that the stream is live
  • 40. 10. Keep on streamin’ Re-stream as live or make the VOD available ASAP!  The best window of time to gain maximum audience is immediately after the live event ends  Keep it on the same link / page as your live stream
  • 41. Try Ustream and get in touch! 1. Create an account for free at ustream.tv 2. Watch our how-to videos at ustream.tv/howto 3. Email us with any questions: webinar@ustream.tv Alden Fertig, Product Marketing Manager, USTREAM
  • 42. Presented by: Best Practices for Live Streaming