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Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder
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Ap Psych Final Bipolar Disorder

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This is my AP Psychology powerpoint on Bipolar Disorder

This is my AP Psychology powerpoint on Bipolar Disorder

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  • 1. Bipolar Disorder By: Albina Bhimani
  • 2. What is Bipolar Disorder?
  • 3. What is Bipolar Disorder?
    • Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. Symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe. They are different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through from time to time.
  • 4.
    • Bipolar disorder symptoms can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. But bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead full and productive lives.
  • 5.
    • People with bipolar disorder experience unusually intense emotional states that occur in distinct periods called "mood episodes." An overly joyful or overexcited state is called a manic episode, and an extremely sad or hopeless state is called a depressive episode. Sometimes, a mood episode includes symptoms of both mania and depression. This is called a mixed state. People with bipolar disorder also may be explosive and irritable during a mood episode.
  • 6. Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder
  • 7. Symptoms of Mania or Manic Episode
    • Mood Changes
    • A long period of feeling "high," or an overly happy or outgoing mood
    • Extremely irritable mood, agitation, feeling "jumpy" or "wired."
    • Behavioral Changes
    • Talking very fast, jumping from one idea to another, having racing thoughts
    • Being easily distracted
    • Increasing goal-directed activities, such as taking on new projects
    • Being restless
    • Sleeping little
    • Having an unrealistic belief in one's abilities
    • Behaving impulsively and taking part in a lot of pleasurable, high-risk behaviors, such as spending sprees, impulsive sex, and impulsive business investments.
  • 8. Symptoms of Depression or Depressive state
    • Mood Changes
    • A long period of feeling worried or empty
    • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed, including sex.
    • Behavioral Changes
    • Feeling tired or "slowed down"
    • Having problems concentrating, remembering, and making decisions
    • Being restless or irritable
    • Changing eating, sleeping, or other habits
    • Thinking of death or suicide, or attempting suicide
  • 9.
    • One side of the scale includes severe depression, moderate depression, and mild low mood. Moderate depression may cause less extreme symptoms, and mild low mood is called dysthymia when it is chronic or long-term. In the middle of the scale is normal or balanced mood.
    • At the other end of the scale are hypomania and severe mania. Some people with bipolar disorder experience hypomania. During hypomanic episodes, a person may have increased energy and activity levels that are not as severe as typical mania, or he or she may have episodes that last less than a week and do not require emergency care. A person having a hypomanic episode may feel very good, be highly productive, and function well.
    In addition to mania and depression, bipolar disorder can cause a range of moods, as shown on the scale.
  • 10.
    • Sometimes, a person with severe episodes of mania or depression has psychotic symptoms too, such as hallucinations or delusions. The psychotic symptoms tend to reflect the person's extreme mood. For example, psychotic symptoms for a person having a manic episode may include believing he or she is famous, has a lot of money, or has special powers. In the same way, a person having a depressive episode may believe he or she is ruined and penniless, or has committed a crime.
  • 11.
    • People with bipolar disorder may also have behavioral problems. They may abuse alcohol or substances, have relationship problems, or perform poorly in school or at work. At first, it's not easy to recognize these problems as signs of a major mental illness.
  • 12. What causes Bipolar Disorder?
  • 13.
    • Scientists are learning about the possible causes of bipolar disorder. Most scientists agree that there is no single cause. Rather, many factors likely act together to produce the illness or increase risk.
  • 14. Genetics
    • Bipolar disorder tends to run in families, so researchers are looking for genes that may increase a person's chance of developing the illness. Genes are the "building blocks" of heredity.
    • Children with a parent or sibling who has bipolar disorder are four to six times more likely to develop the illness, compared with children who do not have a family history of bipolar disorder. However, most children with a family history of bipolar disorder will not develop the illness.
  • 15. Brain Structure and Functioning
    • Brain-imaging studies are helping scientists learn what happens in the brain of a person with bipolar disorder. Newer brain-imaging tools, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), allow researchers to take pictures of the living brain at work.
    • Some imaging studies show how the brains of people with bipolar disorder may differ from the brains of healthy people or people with other mental disorders. For example, one study using MRI found that the pattern of brain development in children with bipolar disorder was similar to that in children with "multi-dimensional impairment," a disorder that causes symptoms that overlap somewhat with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This suggests that the common pattern of brain development may be linked to general risk for unstable moods.
  • 16. How is Bipolar Disorder Treated?
  • 17.
    • To date, there is no cure for bipolar disorder. But proper treatment helps most people with bipolar disorder gain better control of their mood swings and related symptoms. This is also true for people with the most severe forms of the illness.
    • Because bipolar disorder is a lifelong and recurrent illness, people with the disorder need long-term treatment to maintain control of bipolar symptoms. An effective maintenance treatment plan includes medication and psychotherapy for preventing relapse and reducing symptom severity.
  • 18. Personal Stories
  • 19.
    • I don’t know why my classmates don’t talk to me. I don’t really fit in any group. I tried to talk to a group of girls at recess, so I jumped off the bench and ran to them and screamed “hi”, but they just walked away. I always feel that I just don’t get along with my classmates. I am always a mix of emotions. Sometimes hyper, but sometimes so low.
  • 20.
    • When I turned 20, I started drinking abusively. I felt so relaxed and “normal” when I was in a different state of mind. I started getting involved with thugs and street dealers. Even though I felt better, I hated myself for being so disrespectful and mean. I didn’t what to do any of this, I just felt myself plunging downward.
  • 21.
    • Soon I got married an alcoholic. We understood each other. We had so many similarities. We thought we understood each other. But soon our marriage started to break apart. Even though we spent so much time together, he just couldn’t handle my abrupt changes in mood. Sometimes I was happy, but other times I just would burst in anger.
  • 22.
    • By that time we had a young son. I had so many dreams for him, to be successful. My marriage had broken, but I kept trying to fix it. I followed my husband all around the nation trying to convince him to come back to me. Sometimes I felt that I loved him so much, other times I would be so angry with him. But we gave our marriage a second chance.
  • 23.
    • My husband beat me horribly. I felt no love from anyone, so I didn’t have any to give, not even for my own son. I didn’t love him anymore, I didn’t love myself, I didn’t love anyone. I had been admitted to the hospital three times in 5 years. Each time I would have horrible nightmares that I thought were real. Some so horrible that a few times I tried to kill myself. My life had become a mix of fantasy and reality.
  • 24.
    • After a while they decided to put me on meds. I had so many side effects, that I felt better without them. Then I was prescribed a mood stabilizer and an antidepressant. I felt so much more better. I began to look for a job so that I could support my son. I found a job and went back to school. It was hard to balance everything, because I sometimes had abrupt changes in my behavior.
  • 25.
    • It took me awhile to get my life back on track because I sometimes felt so tired of fighting myself. But the thought of losing my son always made me continue on not only the betterment of my son’s life, but also mine. Thankfully my son didn’t have bipolar disorder. He was a happy, normal boy who deserved all his happiness.
  • 26.
    • My son is now 18 years old. He just graduated and is going to a good college. He loves himself and he knows that I love him with all my heart. I didn’t cause him any harm. I still casually have abrupt changes in feelings but know I can live my life without the fear of always hurting myself or other. I can live my life the way I want it!

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