MAST PORTAL GROUP
 Conti, Dower, Gaffney, Gillies, Rogers
Agenda

• Motivating Factors
• Definitions: Portal, Gadgets, UI Design
• What’s publicly available
• From Mockups to Recomm...
Motivating Factors

• Consolidate access to existing application
  functionality and look-and-feel
• Single Sign-on to exi...
all
all
all
all
What is a portal?
What is a portal?
•   A web portal is a framework for integrating
    information, people and processes across
    organiz...
What is a portal?
•   A web portal is a framework for integrating
    information, people and processes across
    organiz...
What is a portal?
•   A web portal is a framework for integrating
    information, people and processes across
    organiz...
What is a portal?
•   A web portal is a framework for integrating
            Framework
    information, people and proces...
What is a portal?
•   A web portal is a framework for integrating
    information, people and processes across
    organiz...
Key Features
Single Sign-On
Single Sign-On
Integration
Single Sign-On
Integration
Customization
Single Sign-On
Integration
Customization
Access Control
Single Sign-On
Integration
Customization
Access Control
Federation
What is a gadget?
What is a gadget?
•   A gadget is a portable chunk of code that can be
    installed and executed within any separate HTML...
What is a gadget?
•   A gadget is a portable chunk of code that can be
    installed and executed within any separate HTML...
What is a gadget?
•   A gadget is a portable chunk of code that can be
    installed and executed within any separate HTML...
What is a gadget?
•   A gadget is a portable chunk of code that can be
    installed and executed within any separate HTML...
UI Design Principles
Structure
Structure
Simplicity
Structure
Simplicity
Visibility
Structure
Simplicity
Visibility
Feedback
Structure
Simplicity
Visibility
Feedback
Tolerance
Structure
Simplicity
Visibility
Feedback
Tolerance
Reuse
Portal Features   User Login and Preference
SEARCH   CONTENT




                    FE
                    ED
                    BA
NE                  CK
WS
Credit: Antonio Volpicelli
advanced
advanced
advanced
advanced




Single Search Box
advanced
advanced
advanced



Content Type   Result Summary
advanced



Content Type   Result Summary
MOBILE
iOS and Android
MOBILE
iOS and Android
S T
              J W
         ks
   a   n
Th
RECOMMENDATIONS
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Become a “gadget shop”:   API (iGoogle)
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Become a “gadget shop”:                      API (iGoogle)
2. Deploy a portal with the following charac...
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Become a “gadget shop”:                      API (iGoogle)
2. Deploy a portal with the following charac...
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Become a “gadget shop”:                      API (iGoogle)
2. Deploy a portal with the following charac...
RECOMMENDATIONS
RECOMMENDATIONS

•Use   Cases Group
RECOMMENDATIONS

•Use   Cases Group
•Client   Design Group
RECOMMENDATIONS

•Use   Cases Group
•Client   Design Group
•Data   Services Group
RECOMMENDATIONS

•Use   Cases Group
•Client   Design Group
•Data   Services Group
•Data   Model Group
Portal Definition Document
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations
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MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations

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The Multi-mission archive at Space Telescope has started the process of looking at portal technology to revamp its sites in light of the addition of new missions with new requirements for data presentation and delivery.

The goal is to consolidate several services and presentation layers into a "One Archive" model.

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  • * the idea of searching "the archive" rather than individual missions - one can drill down to individual missions as needed

    the same look/feel for all missions -- I say this is different than current because the idea is to hide the differences of the missions unless necessary






























  • Gadgets – the New User Interface Gadgets and other influential consumer web technologies can dramatically improve enterprise applications. Unlike portlets, gadgets are client-side code that exchange structured data with the server using REST APIs that return JSON or xml objects. By leveraging JavaScript, HTML and CSS gadgets are not only easier to use and develop than portlets, they are also universal. Everyone can write a web app these days. The portlet container I built 8 years ago eventually led to me to found eXo, where we built a next-generation platform for Java with Google technologies like Gadgets, OpenSocial, GWT and Android. Our vision is simple: provide a platform for building applications with rich user experiences in the cloud. This means that the entire process of building an enterprise web application can be done online, from its development in a web IDE to its deployment and monitoring within a tenant of a cloud platform.
  • Gadgets – the New User Interface Gadgets and other influential consumer web technologies can dramatically improve enterprise applications. Unlike portlets, gadgets are client-side code that exchange structured data with the server using REST APIs that return JSON or xml objects. By leveraging JavaScript, HTML and CSS gadgets are not only easier to use and develop than portlets, they are also universal. Everyone can write a web app these days. The portlet container I built 8 years ago eventually led to me to found eXo, where we built a next-generation platform for Java with Google technologies like Gadgets, OpenSocial, GWT and Android. Our vision is simple: provide a platform for building applications with rich user experiences in the cloud. This means that the entire process of building an enterprise web application can be done online, from its development in a web IDE to its deployment and monitoring within a tenant of a cloud platform.
  • Gadgets – the New User Interface Gadgets and other influential consumer web technologies can dramatically improve enterprise applications. Unlike portlets, gadgets are client-side code that exchange structured data with the server using REST APIs that return JSON or xml objects. By leveraging JavaScript, HTML and CSS gadgets are not only easier to use and develop than portlets, they are also universal. Everyone can write a web app these days. The portlet container I built 8 years ago eventually led to me to found eXo, where we built a next-generation platform for Java with Google technologies like Gadgets, OpenSocial, GWT and Android. Our vision is simple: provide a platform for building applications with rich user experiences in the cloud. This means that the entire process of building an enterprise web application can be done online, from its development in a web IDE to its deployment and monitoring within a tenant of a cloud platform.
  • Gadgets – the New User Interface Gadgets and other influential consumer web technologies can dramatically improve enterprise applications. Unlike portlets, gadgets are client-side code that exchange structured data with the server using REST APIs that return JSON or xml objects. By leveraging JavaScript, HTML and CSS gadgets are not only easier to use and develop than portlets, they are also universal. Everyone can write a web app these days. The portlet container I built 8 years ago eventually led to me to found eXo, where we built a next-generation platform for Java with Google technologies like Gadgets, OpenSocial, GWT and Android. Our vision is simple: provide a platform for building applications with rich user experiences in the cloud. This means that the entire process of building an enterprise web application can be done online, from its development in a web IDE to its deployment and monitoring within a tenant of a cloud platform.
  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.

  • The structure principle: Design should organize the user interface purposefully, in meaningful and useful ways based on clear, consistent models that are apparent and recognizable to users, putting related things together and separating unrelated things, differentiating dissimilar things and making similar things resemble one another. The structure principle is concerned with overall user interface architecture.

    The simplicity principle: The design should make simple, common tasks easy, communicating clearly and simply in the user's own language, and providing good shortcuts that are meaningfully related to longer procedures.

    The visibility principle: The design should make all needed options and materials for a given task visible without distracting the user with extraneous or redundant information. Good designs don't overwhelm users with alternatives or confuse with unneeded information.

    The feedback principle: The design should keep users informed of actions or interpretations, changes of state or condition, and errors or exceptions that are relevant and of interest to the user through clear, concise, and unambiguous language familiar to users.

    The tolerance principle: The design should be flexible and tolerant, reducing the cost of mistakes and misuse by allowing undoing and redoing, while also preventing errors wherever possible by tolerating varied inputs and sequences and by interpreting all reasonable actions.

    The reuse principle: The design should reuse internal and external components and behaviors, maintaining consistency with purpose rather than merely arbitrary consistency, thus reducing the need for users to rethink and remember.


































































  • Anyone with an open social container can drop MAST gadget. Web development is going in the direction of gadgets
  • Anyone with an open social container can drop MAST gadget. Web development is going in the direction of gadgets
  • Anyone with an open social container can drop MAST gadget. Web development is going in the direction of gadgets
  • Anyone with an open social container can drop MAST gadget. Web development is going in the direction of gadgets
  • Anyone with an open social container can drop MAST gadget. Web development is going in the direction of gadgets





  • MAST Portal: drivers and recommendations

    1. 1. MAST PORTAL GROUP Conti, Dower, Gaffney, Gillies, Rogers
    2. 2. Agenda • Motivating Factors • Definitions: Portal, Gadgets, UI Design • What’s publicly available • From Mockups to Recommendations
    3. 3. Motivating Factors • Consolidate access to existing application functionality and look-and-feel • Single Sign-on to existing and new applications • Provide a vehicle to integrate new functionality • Leverage existing programming expertise: python, php, .net, actionscript, javascript,….
    4. 4. all
    5. 5. all
    6. 6. all
    7. 7. all
    8. 8. What is a portal?
    9. 9. What is a portal? • A web portal is a framework for integrating information, people and processes across organizational boundaries
    10. 10. What is a portal? • A web portal is a framework for integrating information, people and processes across organizational boundaries • A web portal provides a secure unified access point, and is designed to aggregate and personalize information through application- specific “gadgets”
    11. 11. What is a portal? • A web portal is a framework for integrating information, people and processes across organizational boundaries • A web portal provides a secure unified access point, and is designed to aggregate and personalize information through application- specific “gadgets” • A web portal has de-centralized content contribution and content management, which keeps the information always updated.
    12. 12. What is a portal? • A web portal is a framework for integrating Framework information, people and processes across organizational boundaries • A web portal provides a secure unified access to Access point, and is designed to aggregate and personalize information through application- specific “gadgets” • A web portal has de-centralized content services contribution and content management, which keeps the information always updated.
    13. 13. What is a portal? • A web portal is a framework for integrating information, people and processes across organizational boundaries • A web portal provides a secure unified access point, and is designed to aggregate and personalize information through application- specific “gadgets” • A web portal has de-centralized content contribution and content management, which keeps the information always updated.
    14. 14. Key Features
    15. 15. Single Sign-On
    16. 16. Single Sign-On Integration
    17. 17. Single Sign-On Integration Customization
    18. 18. Single Sign-On Integration Customization Access Control
    19. 19. Single Sign-On Integration Customization Access Control Federation
    20. 20. What is a gadget?
    21. 21. What is a gadget? • A gadget is a portable chunk of code that can be installed and executed within any separate HTML- based container by an end user without requiring additional compilation
    22. 22. What is a gadget? • A gadget is a portable chunk of code that can be installed and executed within any separate HTML- based container by an end user without requiring additional compilation • A gadget runs in a “container” that manages multiple gadgets
    23. 23. What is a gadget? • A gadget is a portable chunk of code that can be installed and executed within any separate HTML- based container by an end user without requiring additional compilation • A gadget runs in a “container” that manages multiple gadgets • A gadget provides an interface to services without the need for an independent application 
    24. 24. What is a gadget? • A gadget is a portable chunk of code that can be installed and executed within any separate HTML- based container by an end user without requiring additional compilation • A gadget runs in a “container” that manages multiple gadgets • A gadget provides an interface to services without the need for an independent application  • A gadget can be developed in any technology that produces HTML + CSS + Javascript or Flash: PHP, .NET, Java, Flex/Actionscript, Python
    25. 25. UI Design Principles
    26. 26. Structure
    27. 27. Structure Simplicity
    28. 28. Structure Simplicity Visibility
    29. 29. Structure Simplicity Visibility Feedback
    30. 30. Structure Simplicity Visibility Feedback Tolerance
    31. 31. Structure Simplicity Visibility Feedback Tolerance Reuse
    32. 32. Portal Features User Login and Preference
    33. 33. SEARCH CONTENT FE ED BA NE CK WS
    34. 34. Credit: Antonio Volpicelli
    35. 35. advanced
    36. 36. advanced
    37. 37. advanced
    38. 38. advanced Single Search Box
    39. 39. advanced
    40. 40. advanced
    41. 41. advanced Content Type Result Summary
    42. 42. advanced Content Type Result Summary
    43. 43. MOBILE iOS and Android
    44. 44. MOBILE iOS and Android
    45. 45. S T J W ks a n Th
    46. 46. RECOMMENDATIONS
    47. 47. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Become a “gadget shop”: API (iGoogle)
    48. 48. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Become a “gadget shop”: API (iGoogle) 2. Deploy a portal with the following characteristics: •OpenSocial gadget container • Embedded Content Editor with Content Management • Single Signon • User Customizable Pages • Supports mobile browsing
    49. 49. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Become a “gadget shop”: API (iGoogle) 2. Deploy a portal with the following characteristics: •OpenSocial gadget container • Embedded Content Editor with Content Management • Single Signon • User Customizable Pages • Supports mobile browsing 3. Make use of the same IDE: Eclipse + language plugins
    50. 50. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Become a “gadget shop”: API (iGoogle) 2. Deploy a portal with the following characteristics: •OpenSocial gadget container • Embedded Content Editor with Content Management • Single Signon • User Customizable Pages • Supports mobile browsing 3. Make use of the same IDE: Eclipse + language plugins 4. Build a mobile app for iPhone OS and Android OS
    51. 51. RECOMMENDATIONS
    52. 52. RECOMMENDATIONS •Use Cases Group
    53. 53. RECOMMENDATIONS •Use Cases Group •Client Design Group
    54. 54. RECOMMENDATIONS •Use Cases Group •Client Design Group •Data Services Group
    55. 55. RECOMMENDATIONS •Use Cases Group •Client Design Group •Data Services Group •Data Model Group
    56. 56. Portal Definition Document
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