• Save
2 Alberto Nunes
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

2 Alberto Nunes

on

  • 401 views

Aquaexpo 2011 - Guayaquil, Ecuador

Aquaexpo 2011 - Guayaquil, Ecuador

Statistics

Views

Total Views
401
Views on SlideShare
391
Embed Views
10

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 10

http://www.linkedin.com 7
https://www.linkedin.com 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

2 Alberto Nunes 2 Alberto Nunes Presentation Transcript

  • Practical Formulation Issues Towards Performance‐Efficient Low Fish Meal Diets for the White Shrimp, Litopenaeus vannameiAlberto J.P. NunesAssociate ProfessorXIII Congreso Ecuatoriano de Acuicultura & AQUAEXPO 2011Guayaquil, EcuadorOctober 20, 2011Session: Nutrition and Feeding Strategies
  • Photo Credit : John Stanmeyer. National Geographic MagazineEnd of Plenty: A World Food CrisisNational Geographic Magazine, Jun/2009by Joel K. Bourne Jr. In 50 years (1950‐2010) the human population increased 2.67 times.  In three years, global population should exceed 7 billions.
  • Photo Credit : John Stanmeyer. National Geographic MagazineA NEW GREEN Revolution is NeededLessons from AgricultureNational Geographic Magazine, Jun/2009by Joel K. Bourne Jr. HOW WE DID IT BEFORE HOW IT NEEDS TO BE DONE 1.Irrigation 1.Targeted breeding 2.Dwarf varieties 2.Sustainable farming 3.Chemical pesticides 3.Smarter irrigation 4.Chemical fertilizersProduction more than doubled in Asia between the 60s and 70s, lowering the price of grains and other crops, but with ecological costs
  • Aquaculture: largest consumer of fish meal In 2006, aquafeeds used 3.7 million MT of fish meal, 68.2% of the  estimated global production¶ MT x 1,000 60,014Production of finfish and crustaceans*Total fed production 45,557 23,851 (76%) 15,072 (63%) 2006 2020E ¶ Source: Tacon and Metian, 2008 In 10 years, fed‐raised finfish and crustaceans will account for ¾ of world  production*MT x 1,000. Excludes filter‐feeding fish
  • Fish meal use is reducing in shrimp feeds Shrimp are the largest consumer of fish meal within the  aquaculture industry, ahead of marine fish and salmon 10,000 MT x 1,000 FIFO 2.5 9,000 Farm‐raised marine shrimp production 8,000 1.9 2.0 7,000Source: Tacon and Metian, 2008 6,000 1.5 Fish IN : Fish OUT Ratio 5,000 4,000 1.0 3,000 Pelagic forage fish equivalent ¶ 2,000 0.5 0.3 1,000 Projections 0 0.0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2010 2015 2020 Over the past 15 years, fish meal inclusion in shrimp feeds reduced from 28% (1995)  to 12% (2010). FIFO more efficient than salmon, trout, eel and marine fish¶ .
  • Drivers for fish meal reduction2,000 (1) PRODUCTION1,800 capture fisheries production  remains stagnant compared 1,600 to an 8.8% annual growth 1,400 Fishmeal rate in aquaculture output1,200 (2) PRICES1,000 fishmeal prices have risen  800 significantly compared to  Soybean meal 600 other agricultural  400 commodity protein  200 ingredients 0 (3) SUSTAINABILITY Jan‐2005 Jan‐2006 Jan‐2007 Jan‐2008 Jan‐2009 Jan‐2010 as shrimp farming moves into  Year more intensive systems and  Five‐year market price (2005‐2010) for fishmeal and soybean meal.  production rises, there is a  Source: Oil World.  growing demand for  formulated diets dependent  Fishmeal (64/65% CP, CIF Hamburg). Soybean meal (pellets 44/45% CP Argentina, CIF  Rotterdam). on static supplies of fish  meal
  • Farmers are raising a less nutrient‐dependent shrimp species 3,399 MT3,500 Grand Total Harvest (MT x 1,000)3,0002,500 2,259 MT 1,135 MT 66%2,000 Litopenaeus vannamei 631 MT 56%1,500 145 MT 13% Penaeus monodon1,000 722 MT Source: FAO (2010) 21% 500 Other species 0 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 Production of  L. vannamei increased 16x in 8 years (2000 vs. 2008) compared to  14% for the tiger shrimp
  • Major challengesShrimp feed formulators need to continuously struggle with: (1)COSTS: keep margins acceptable within the business regardless of raw material price fluctuation(2)QUALITY/PERFORMANCE: preserve company identity and market share through feed quality/performance(3)INNOVATION: keep track of advancements and be able discriminate between an opportunity and alchemy
  • About aquaculture at LABOMAR, Brazil50‐year old marine  Lane snapper, Lutjanus  synagrissciences institution located in NE BrazilPart of the Federal University of the State of Ceará Mutton snapper, Lutjanus analisOwns 5‐ha facility where applied  OUTDOOR SYSTEM research on  (Marine Finfish)reproduction, nutrition, disease and genetics of marine fish and crustaceans is carried out Fat and common  snook, Centropomus  Cobia, Rachycentron canadum parallelus and C. undecimalis
  • Outdoor system: marine finfish FISH GROWER TANKS NURSERY TANKS25 round tanks of 8 m3 (1.5 m in height) together with three nursery tanks of 23 m3The system currently has eight header tanks, each holding 20 m3 of filtered seawaterFish can be reared up to 300 g in weight at initial stocking densities of 10 fish/m3
  • Feed manufacturing facility FISH GROWER TANKS LAB EXTRUDER PRESENTNURSERY TANKS PASTMEAT GRINDERAble to prepare > 60 kg of lab‐made extruded dietsSinking or slow‐sinking diets
  • Rearing system: green water Round tanks of 1.000‐L volume 1.02 m2 bottom area Zero to 25% weekly water exchange
  • Round tanks of 500‐L volume Rearing system: clear water 0.57 m2 bottom area 12‐h filtering
  • Y‐MAZE system: shrimp System design after Lee (1992), Costero & Meyers (1993), Lee For details see Nunes et al. / Aquaculture 260 (2006) 244‐254.  & Meyers (1996, 1997) e Mendoza et al. (1997) VIDEO MONITORING Performs precise and reliable studies on feed  selectivity and preference of marine shrimp Y‐MAZE SYSTEM First Y‐maze prototype at LABOMAR, Brazil was  developed in 2002. System was validated to  evaluate both feed attraction and stimulation
  • Shrimp rearing: standard protocol1 2 34 5 6 1. PL10 rearing: 2 PLs/L – 30 ‐40 days 4. Fed twice a day on a consumption basis 2. Juvenile stocking (2‐4 g shrimp) 5. Meals calculated individually Green water: 40 – 70 shrimp/m2 6. Shrimp samples every 3.5 weeks Clear water: 70 ‐ 100 shrimp/m2 7. Harvest after 10 weeks (10 – 20 g shrimp)
  • Adjusting feeds to market needsFarm‐Reared Shrimp Production in Brazil Source: Nunes et al. (2011). Panorama da Aquicultura, 21(124):  26‐33. Brazil took 20 years to reach industrial scale in shrimp farming held back by  technical and economical constraints 
  • Looking for cheaper protein sourcesBrazil is among the largest global producers of poultry, cattle and swine meatLarge volumes of by‐products from animal slaughtering availableHigh in protein, price cost‐competitive for use within aquafeeds, but how about quality?Salmon meal Swine Plasma Blood meal Meat & bone Feather meal66.1% CP 78.4% CP 87.2% CP 41.1% CP 75.7% CP USD 1,439/MT USD 5,000/MT USD 777/MT USD 460/MT USD 432/MT Meat & bone Tilapia meal Poultry & feather Poultry meal FML by‐catch 47.6% CP 62.8% CP 62.4% CP 58.5% CP 50.3% CP USD 576/MT USD 1,093/MT USD 806/MT USD 806/MT USD 1,036/MTSource: SANTOS et al. (in preparation). M.Sc. Thesis. LABOMAR, Brazil
  • Chemical profile of animal by‐products % Crude Protein 70.0 % Ash % Digestibility in pepsin % Fat Peroxide (meq O2/kg) 60.0 99.1% 50.0 87.2% 79.0% 78.5% 75.6% 76.6% 40.0 62.8% 62.4% 66.1% 61.7% 59.3% 58.5% 30.0 51.7% 54.6% 11.1% 50.3% 42.5% 45.4% 41.1% 47.6% 20.0 10.0 0.0 Salmon meal,  Swine plasma,  Blood meal,  Meat & bone,  Feather meal,  Meat & bone,  Tilapia meal,  Poultry &  Poultry meal,   Fishmeal by 66% CP 79% CP 87% CP 41% CP 76% CP 48% CP 63% CP feather, 62%  58% CP catch, 51% CP CP Animal by‐products are highly variable on their chemical profile and freshness  (sources and processing methods). Monitoring of chemical evaluation is required in  almost every batch of raw material purchased. Source: SANTOS et al. (in preparation). M.Sc. Thesis. LABOMAR, Brazil
  • Diets: where was protein coming from?MEAT & BONE, 41% CP Salmon meal MEAT & BONE, 48% CP Salmon meal FEATHER MEAL, 76% CP Salmon meal35.0% CP diet 11.9% 35.0% CP diet 3.3% 39.0% CP diet 6.7% Meat & bone 24.1% Meat & bone Feather meal 15.2% 27.9% Soybean &  wheat flour Soybean &  Soybean &  65.4% wheat flour wheat flour 72.9% 72.6%BLOOD MEAL, 87% CP SWINE PLASMA, 79% CP TILAPIA MEAL, 63% CP Salmon meal Salmon meal37.4% CP diet 37.4% CP diet 17.1% 35.0% CP diet 15.6% Tilapia meal 27.1% Blood meal Swine plasma 16.3% 14.7% Soybean &  Soybean &  wheat flour wheat flour Soybean &  68.1% 68.2% wheat flour 72.9%POULTRY MEAL, 58% CP POULTRY & FEATHER, 62% CP FISHMEAL BY‐CATCH, 51% CP35.0% CP diet 35.0% CP diet 35.0% CP diet Poultry &  Fishmeal by ‐ Poultry meal   feather product 27,1% 27.2% 26.8% Soybean &  wheat flour Soybean &  72.8% wheat flour Soybean &  73.2% wheat flour 72.9%
  • Formula cost and dietary inclusion Tested ingredient Dietary inclusion level (%, as is) Salmon meal Formula cost per MT Source: SANTOS et al. (in preparation). M.Sc. Thesis. LABOMAR, Brazil $ 603 $ 577 $ 956 $ 578 $ 652 $ 649 $ 579 $ 633 $ 585 $ 672 13.0% 7.0% 7.0% 14.4% 17.7% 18.7% 16.2% 15.1% 15.3% 14.4% 9.7% 8.8% 6.3% 4.0% 1.8%Salmon meal,  Swine plasma, Blood meal, Meat & bone, Feather meal,  Meat & bone, Tilapia meal, Poultry &  Poultry meal,   Fishmeal by‐66%  CP 79% CP  87% CP  41% CP 76% CP 48% CP  63% CP  feather, 62% CP 58% CP catch, 51% CP 0% +29.8% ‐3.4% ‐11.4% ‐16.1% ‐16.4% ‐6.0% ‐16.0% ‐14.8% ‐3.0% Dietary inclusion level of tested ingredients with formulation costs and savings  relative to control diet with 14.4% salmon meal
  • Cost and performance need to walk together % Loss in performance % Reduction in formula cost12.00 FINAL SHRIMP BODY WEIGHT (g) Source: SANTOS et al. (in preparation). M.Sc. Thesis. LABOMAR, Brazil 11.05 g ( 2.03 ± 0.21 g; 70 shrimp/m2 clear‐water, 72‐day culture) 10.26 g 10.47 g 10.33 g e 9.97 g 10.13 g10.00 a ae a a 9.42 g ad 8.93 g +29.8% cd 8.24 g c 7.71 g 8.00 b b ‐3.4% ‐3.0% ‐11.4% 6.00 ‐ 16.1% ‐14.8% ‐7.7% ‐5.5% ‐16.0% ‐16.4% ‐6.0% ‐9.0% ‐6.9% ‐10.9% ‐23.7% ‐17.3% 4.00 Salmon meal,  Swine plasma,  Blood meal,  Meat & bone,  Feather meal,  Meat & bone,  Tilapia meal,  Poultry &  Poultry meal,   Fishmeal by‐ ‐ 66% CP 79% CP 87% CP 41% CP 76% CP 48% CP 63% CP feather, 62% CP  58% CP catch, 51% CP  ‐34.1% ‐43.3% Decision on what/how to replace fish meal should be made on the basis of shrimp  performance, not on formulation costs alone
  • Sources of Rendered Animal Proteins Have Low Stimulatory Power for L. vannamei Source: Nunes et al 2006. Aquaculture, 260: 244‐254. 120 +Choices 100 Rejection 80 a ac ad ae 60 af bcdef 40 b 20 g 0 CON MBM SM FMA FMS BM FO FS*Values in the column which do not share a same superscript are statistically different between them by the z‐test (P<0.05);  *control (CON) ; meat and bone meal (MBM); squid meal (SM); fishmeal–Peruvian origin (FMPO);  fishmeal–Brazilian origin (FMBO); blood meal (BM); fish oil (FO); fish solubles (FS) Photo credit: Otavio Serino Castro
  • Protein is not what only matters ORIGINPROTEIN & EAA  Marine Animal PlantPROFILE Fish meal,  Krill  Meat &  Poultry by‐ Soybean  Soy protein  Anchovy meal* bone meal product meal meal concentrate*Crude protein 65.5 59.0 50.0 59.7 44.8 62.6 CVEAAArginine 3.85 6.11 3.37 4.06 3.39 5.00 25%Histidine 1.61 2.61 0.96 1.09 1.19 1.70 40%Isoleucine 3.17 3.85 1.43 2.30 2.03 2.91 33%Leucine 5.05 6.61 3.00 4.11 3.49 5.04 29%Lysine 5.04 7.22 2.67 3.06 2.85 4.01 42%Methionine 1.99 2.66 0.65 1.10 0.57 0.92 63%Cystine 0.60 1.18 0.50 0.84 0.70 0.97 31%Phenylalanine 2.78 3.81 1.70 2.10 2.22 3.34 30%Tyrosine 2.24 3.39 1.09 1.87 1.57 2.32 38%Threonine 2.82 3.19 1.65 0.94 1.78 2.57 39%Triptophan 0.75 1.10 0.30 0.46 0.64 0.79 41%Valine 3.50 3.99 2.45 2.86 2.02 3.00 24%USD/MT** 1,500 1,800 460 810 370 800 60%USD/kg  protein 2.29 3.05 0.92 1.36 0.83 1.28 54%% Difference ‐‐‐ +33% ‐60% ‐41% ‐64% ‐44% ‐‐‐Values according to NRC (1993), except where indicated by * (analyzed in laboratory).**CIF prices, NE Brazil.
  • AMINO ACID1 (% of the diet) P. monodon L. vannamei Arginine 1.85 ‐‐‐Formulate on the  Histidine Isoleucine Leucine 0.80 1.01 1.70 ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐basis of key  Lisine Methionine Phenylalanine 2.08 0.89 1.40 1.54 – 1.60 0.45 – 0.55 ‐‐‐nutrients Threonine 1.40 1.35 Tryptophan 0.20 ‐‐‐ Valine 1.35 ‐‐‐ LIPIDS2 (% of the diet) Linoleic acid (18:2n‐6) 1.5 0.1 Reported nutrient requirements  Linolenic acid (18:3n‐3) Arachidonic acid (20:4n‐6) 1 – 2.5 Dispensable 0.1 0.2 for the tiger shrimp Penaeus  Eicosapentanoic acid (20:5n‐3) 0.9 0.9 Docosahexanoic acid (22:6n‐3) 0.9 – 1.44 ‐‐‐ monodon and the white shrimp  Phospholipids ‐‐‐ 1.5 – 5 Cholesterol ‐‐‐ 0.05 – 0.15 Litopenaeus vannamei. Values  MACRO MINERALS (g/kg of the diet) Calcium ‐‐‐ 23 represent minimum amounts  Phosphorus ‐‐‐ 9 required to achieve maximum  Potassium Sodium ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ 9 6 growth. Values on the dry  Magnesium TRACE ELEMENTS (mg/kg of the diet) ‐‐‐ 2 matter basis. Copper ‐‐‐ 25 Iron ‐‐‐ 300 Manganese ‐‐‐ 20 Zinc ‐‐‐ 1101 For P. monodon according to Millamena et al. (1996a,b,  Selenium ‐‐‐ 11997, 1998, 1999) and for L. vannamei according to Fox  VITAMINS (mg/kg of the diet)et al. (1995, 1999) and Huai et al. (2009); 2For P.  Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) 15 ‐‐‐monodon according to Glencross & Smith (1997, 1999,  Nicotinic acid (Niacin) 7 ‐‐‐2001a,b) and Glencross et al. (2002a,b); 3In the form of  Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) 0.2 ‐‐‐choline chloride.  Choline3 ‐‐‐ 1,000** Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) 209 120 Vitamin E (Tocoferol) ‐‐‐ 100 Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol) 0.1 ‐‐‐ Vitamin K (Phylloquinone) 35 ‐‐‐
  • Methionine affects performanceIngredient (%) 80 A 70 A 60 ASoybean meal, 46% 32.0 33.3 30.3Wheat flour 25.0 25.0 25.0Fishmeal, Anchovy 13.0 7.3 0.0Fishmeal, by‐catch 10.0 10.0 5.1Corn gluten meal 5.0 5.0 10.4 Lower amino acid levelsRice, Broken 3.7 1.8 1.8Dicalcium Phosphate 3.6 3.2 2.3 NUTRIENT (%) 80 A 70 A 60 AFish oil 2.8 2.3 0.4 Crude Protein 35.50 35.50 35.50Lecithin, Fluid 1.7 1.9 2.2 Crude Fat 8.00 8.50 8.50Salt 1.0 1.0 1.0 Crude Fiber 1.86 1.96 1.84Vitamin‐Mineral Pmx 1.0 1.0 1.0 Ash 11.94 12.57 13.27Pegabind (Pellet Binder) 0.5 0.5 0.5 Lysine 1.85 1.72 1.41Magnesium Sulfate 0.16 0.00 0.00 Met+Cys 1.09 1.01 0.93Potassium Chloride 0.14 0.00 0.00 Methionine 0.67 0.59 0.50Cholesterol 0.12 0.11 0.11Stay C 0.03 0.03 0.03Commercial attractant 0.2 0.3 0.4Meat and bone meal 0.0 7.2 19.6Formula cost (US$/MT) 658 593 505 Cost savings in formulation ‐11.0% ‐33.3%
  • AA Profile Significantly ImpactsGrowth and FCR 72‐day rearing trial with L. vannamei in indoor  tanks (clear water) at LABOMAR, Brazil. Feeds Survival % Yield (g/m2) Growth (g/wk)60A 91.2 ± 4.8 884 ± 74.9 0.98 ± 0.06 a Initial Stocking Density:70A 93.0 ± 3.8 1,094 ± 192.0 1.17 ± 0.13 a 57 shrimp/tank or 80A 91.6 ± 1.5 1,085 ± 78.0 1.19 ± 0.10 b 100 shrimp/m2ANOVA  NS NS < 0.05PFeeds Weight In. (g) Weight Fn. (g) FCR60A 4.14 ± 0.31 14.3 ± 0.64 a 2.75 ± 0.17 b70A 3.93 ± 0.16 16.0 ± 1.39 ab 2.30 ± 0.24 a80A 4.09 ± 0.46 16.3 ± 1.12 b 2.47 ± 0.07 aANOVA P NS < 0.05 < 0.05
  • Amino acid profile of commercial feeds Mean +18% 0% Minimum 9.00 +37% Maximum 8.00 Required* 7.00 +9% How important  +16% 6.00 +12% +6% is MET to shrimp  +11% ‐26% 5.00 biological  4.00 +1% ‐33% performance? 3.00 +17% 2.00 1.00 0.00 ARG HIS ISO LEU LYS MET CYS M+C PHE TYR P+T THR TRY VALg of EAA/100 g of crude protein* Analyzed feeds (six) met marine shrimp EAA  requirements, but METHIONINE was the most  limiting EAA in all diets*Source: Lemos and Nunes (2008). Aquaculture Nutrition 2008 14; 181–191
  • In commercial feeds, methionine is crucialPerformance of L. vannamei in clear water after 56 days of rearing fed commercial diets. Temp. 29.5 °C; sal. 33.4 ‰; stocking density. 114 ind./m2; initial weight 3.28 (± 0.31). Source: Lemos and Nunes (2008). Aquaculture Nutrition 2008 14; 181–191. Parameters T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 T8 Survival (%) 92.7a (1.94) 91.5a (5.10) 81.9b (9.26) 93.8a (2.18) 91.2a (2.31) 90.8a (3.32) Yield (Kg/m2) 0.50a (0.12) 0.44a (0.09) 0.61ab (0.10) 0.60ab (0.13) 0.77b (0.11) 0.78b (0.14) Growth (g/week) 0.63a (0.13) 0.56a (0.10) 0.91b (0.04) 0.73a (0.14) 0.97b (0.13) 0.98b (0.14) Feed cons. (g) 755.9a (23.6) 691.9b (55.9) 879.7c (62.0) 915.4c (32.7) 887.9c (23.7) 977.9d (31.6) Biomass gain (g) 286.2a (68.0) 252.2a (50.0) 349.1ab (58.7) 342.9ab (71.5) 439.2b (64.8) 444.1b (81.3) FCR 2.75 (0.63) 2.80 (0.41) 2.56 (0.37) 2.75 (0.49) 2.05 (0.27) 2.26 (0.44) Crude Protein 371 (1.2) 348 (0.9) 361 (0.4) 350 (1.2) 356 (0.1) 359 (1.3) Met. (g/100 CP) 1.38 1.47 1.91 1.46 1.75 1.73 Met (%, dw) 0.51% 0.51% 0.69% 0.51% 0.62% 0.62% • High correlation between shrimp growth rate and methionine levels (R2 = 0.73) • Higher growth achieved when feed showed: 1. Lower number of EAA below recommended levels 2. Methionine: 1.70 ‐1.75 g/100 g of crude protein 3. Lysine: > 6.0 g/100 g of crude protein 4. Methionine+cystine: > 2.68 g/100 g of crude protein
  • Consider methionine supplementation when intact  sources lead to deficient levels in the diet< 0.6% of the diet (DM) NV50_C‐ NV100_C+ NV50_C+ NV100_C‐ NV_B MERA™ Met Ca* *2‐hydroxy‐4‐(methylthio)butanoic acid (HMTBa) 
  • Supplementing MET in low fish meal diets Ingredient (g/kg, as is) NV_B NV50_C+ NV50_C‐ NV100_C+ NV100_C‐ Soybean meal 350.0 457.6 450.0 487.0 485.2 Source: Browdy et al (in press). Aquaculture Nutrition. Wheat flour 235.6 217.0 221.7 210.0 210.0 Fish meal, Anchovy 150.0 75.0 75.0 0.0 0.0 Poultry by‐product meal 60.0 60.0 65.7 60.0 60.0 Rice, broken 50.0 21.9 21.8 0.0 0.0 Soy protein concentrate 43.1 30.0 30.0 93.3 96.4 Squid meal, whole 0.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 Fish oil 15.0 30.0 30.0 44.0 44.0 Soybean oil 19.4 8.5 7.9 0.0 0.0 HMTBa 0.0 1.0 0.0 2.0 0.0 L‐lysine 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.3 Other micro ingredients 76.8 79.8 77.8 83.3 84.2 Chemical analysis (g/kg, dry matter basis) Crude protein 392.2 383.5 391.8 393.2 406.6 HMTBa 0.0 0.65 0.0 1.14 0.0 Methionine 6.0 5.4 5.2 4.5 4.8 Cystine 5.4 5.3 5.4 5.6 5.7 Methionine + cystine 11.4 10.7 10.6 10.1 10.5 Lysine 19.7 20.4 18.8 19.4 22.4
  • HMTBa supplementation can reduce costs % SAVINGS in formula cost FINAL SHRIMP BODY WEIGHT (g) (2.22 ± 0.19 g; 70 shrimp/m2;clear‐water, 50 tanks of  %  GAIN/LOSS in performance 500 L; 72‐day culture) b ‐12.2% USD 754/MT ‐10.6% Source: Browdy et al (in press). Aquaculture Nutrition. a ‐6.3% ab ‐7.2% USD 719/MT USD 805/MT FORMULA COST c c +0.2% USD 747/MT USD 706/MT +3.4% ‐3.8% ‐3.8% 9.60g 9.92g 9.23g 9.62g 9.23g NV_B NV_50+ NV_50‐ NV_100+ NV_100‐ A higher body weight was observed when shrimp were fed the basal diet  with 150 g/kg of fish meal (NV_B) or when diets were supplemented with  HMTBa 
  • Can feeding effectors spare fish meal? Spirulina meal Commercial feeding Organic Spirulina powder attractant Complex of amino acids (alanine,  valine, glycine, proline, serine,  histidine, glutamic acid, tyrosine and  betaine) with enzymatically digested  bivalve mollusk
  • Progressive reduction in fish meal levels Diets/Composition (%, as fed)Ingredients  STD N25 N50 C25 S25 C50 S50 Source: Silva‐Neto et al (in press). Aquaculture Research.Peruvian fish meal 18.50 13.87 9.24 13.87 13.87 9.24 9.24Soybean meal 25.00 27.47 35.44 27.86 27.08 35.44 35.02Poultry by‐product meal 8.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00Corn gluten meal 4.00 4.91 3.00 3.78 4.84 3.00 3.00Wheat flour 13.26 17.45 15.22 17.65 17.41 15.22 15.17Broken rice 15.27 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00Fish oil 4.18 4.14 4.41 4.18 4.15 4.41 4.41Others1 4.15 4.15 4.15 4.15 4.15 4.15 4.15Bicalcium phosphate 2.71 3.01 3.55 3.01 3.00 3.55 3.54Spirulina meal 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.00 0.50Commercial feeding effector 0.50 0.00 0.00 0.50 0.00 0.50 0.00Bentonite 4.43 5.00 4.99 5.00 5.00 4.49 4.97Nutritional composition (%, dry matter basis)Crude protein 36.56 36.34 35.34 35.86 36.13 36.10 35.93Ether extract 9.80 9.87 9.56 9.56 9.57 9.66 9.89Ash 14.08 14.57 14.64 14.34 14.27 14.11 14.47Lysine 2.05 1.99 1.99 1.98 1.98 1.99 1.99Methionine 0.76 0.72 0.66 0.71 0.73 0.66 0.66Gross energy (kJ/g) 17.43 17.25 17.97 18.04 18.05 17.86 17.80
  • Low levels of attractants can spare fish meal FINAL SHRIMP BODY WEIGHT (g) % Loss in Performance (3.89 ± 0.25 g; 77 shrimp/m2;clear‐water, 25 tanks of  Source: Silva‐Neto et al (in press). Aquaculture Research. 500 L; 72‐day culture) a ‐1.3% P = 0.007 ‐3.0% ab ‐3.3% ab ab b b b ‐7.6% ‐7.5% ‐7.9% 13.2g 12.3g 12.3g 12.8g 12.8g 13.1g 12.3g STD N25 N50 C25 S25 C50 S50 Starting at 18.5% dietary inclusion, it is possible to reduce fish meal content as much  as 50% without deleterious effects on growth as long as an effective feeding  attractant is used
  • Consider feed attractants when fish meal <10%
  • Effective commercial feeding attractants + Choices  %  Detection5 Feeding5 Attractant (%)1,2 Rejection3 (seconds) (seconds) %CP6 SP/CP7 Put8 Cad8 Hist8 CON 20.0f 22.2 ‐4 ‐4 46.7 66.2 851.4 0.0 0.0 VDB80 35.6ef 37.5 381b 80b 79.8 13.2 97.9 0.0 0.0 VDB68 40.0def 27.8 408b 345ab 68.1 10.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 CAA 66.7ab 0.0 313ab 495a 79.6 77.9 0.0 222.3 140.2 CFSP 73.3a 3.0 308ab 374ad 30.9 13.7 0.0 567.7 0.0 SLM 62.2abcd 0.0 256ab 364ab 41.5 23.8 910.2 145.9 0.0 Bet 42.2cde 15.8 321ab 134bcd 70.3 0.5 0.0 8.2 0.0 DFSLH 53.3abcde 8.3 321ab 288ab 89.2 14.0 696.4 1040.3 95.4 DFSHH 46.7bcde 19.0 363b 254ab 88.9 14.2 873.9 1380.0 167.7 WSPH 60.0abcd 0.0 202a 406ac 72.1 19.2 0.0 483.7 410.0 X2 P <0.001 ‐4 ‐4 ‐4 ‐4 ‐4 ‐4 ‐4 ‐41Positive choice (%) = (number of choices/number of comparisons) x 100; 2Values in the column which do not share a same superscript are statistically different between them by the z‐test (P<0.05); 3Rejection (%) = (number of rejections/number of positive choices) x 100; 4Not applicable; 5Comparisons against the control diet (neutral gelatin + soybean meal); 6%Crude protein: N x 6.25, total N determined by auto‐analyzer C, N, H; 7%Soluble protein: Bradford (1976) bovine serum albumine as standard; 8Putrescine, Cadaverine and Histamine in mg/kg by ionic chromatography.Source: Source: Nunes et al. (2006). Aquaculture, 260: 244‐254. Nunes et al. (2010) Global Aquaculture Advocate, July/August 2010, p. 42‐44.
  • 5% Anchovy fish meal across all diets Diets1/Composition (g/kg, as is)Ingredient 0_KrSq 5_KrSq 10_KrSq 20_KrSq Source: Sá et al (unpublished).Poultry by‐product meal 150.0 145.3 140.5 131.0Krill meal 0.0 2.5 5.0 10.0Whole squid meal 0.0 2.5 5.0 10.0L‐lysine 1.5 1.2 0.9 0.3DL‐methionine 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.4Magnesium sulfate 0.7 0.9 1.0 1.3Others4 846.9 846.9 846.9 846.9Proximate composition (g/kg, dry matter basis)Crude protein 385.9 380.3 381.4 380.7Crude fat 93.7 92.8 64.9 70.4Crude fiber 13.4 46.4 52.1 55.5Ash 94.6 95.3 95.2 96.3Nitrogen‐free extract 412.4 385.2 406.4 397.1Gross energy (MJ/kg) 19.9 20.0 20.0 19.94 Others included: 330.0 g kg‐1 of soybean meal, 250.0 g kg‐1 of wheat flour, 77.5 g kg‐1 of soy protein concentrate, 50.0 g kg‐1 of anchovy fish meal, 25.9 g kg‐1 of broken rice, 27.9 g kg‐1 of soybean oil, 10.0 g kg‐1 of fish oil, 20.0 g kg‐1 of vitamin‐mineral premix, 15.0 g kg‐1 of soybean lecithin, 13.0 g kg‐1 of bicalcium phosphate, 10 g kg‐1 of common salt, 10.0 g kg‐1of potassium chloride, 7.0 g kg‐1 of synthetic binder, 0.7 g kg‐1 of ascorbic acid polyphosphate.
  • Attractants can accelerate growth FINAL SHRIMP BODY WEIGHT (g) ( 1.59 ± 0.46 g; 70 shrimp/m2 clear‐water, 31‐day culture; 35  %  GAIN in performance ± 0.9 g L‐1 salinity, 7.6 ± 0.30 Ph, 28.6 ± 0.6°C temperature) % INCREASE in formula cost a Source: Sá et al (unpublished). ab ab FORMULA COST USD 765/MT P = 0.018 5.0% USD 768/MT USD 766/MT 4.1% 3.2% b USD 750/MT 2.44% 2.06% 2.19% 7.52 g 7.82 g 7.76 g 7.90 g 0_KrSq 5_KrSq 10_KrSq 20_KrSq Adding feeding effectors on low fish meal diets can enhance shrimp growth
  • Addressing the pitfalls of SPCPotential pitfalls Potential pitfalls1.Methionine deficient 1.Rising and volatile market prices2.Low levels of available phosphorus 2.Reduced availability3.Poor palatability proprieties 3.Non‐renewable4.HUFA‐3 deficient 4.Variable qualitySoy Protein Concentrate Fish meal
  • Source: Sá et al (unpublished).18.0% fish meal 13.5% fish meal 9.0% fish meal No SPC 9.0% SPC 9.0% SPC 4.5% fish meal No fish meal 13.5% SPC 18.0% SPC
  • How much fish meal can be replaced by SPC?Ingredients Diets/Composition (g kg‐1 of the diet, as is)% Subst. FM/SPC 0% 25% 50% 75% 100%Fish meal, anchovy 150.0 112.5 75.0 37.5 0.0Fish meal, by‐catch 30.0 22.5 15.0 7.5 0.0 Source: Sá et al (unpublished).Soy protein concentrate 0.0 45.0 90.0 135.0 180.0Broken rice 120.0 124.4 117.8 111.0 104.2Poultry by‐product meal 100.7 80.1 84.1 87.8 91.4Fish oil 14.3 19.0 21.6 24.2 25.0Whole squid meal 0.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0DL‐methionine 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0Soybean oil 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.8Magnesium sulfate 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.7Potassium chloride 8.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0Others * 575.9 575.9 575.9 575.9 575.9Proximate composition (g kg‐1 of the diet, dry matter basis)Crude protein 381.3 385.4 399.9 388.6 393.0Crude fat 75.0 76.5 80.8 77.2 79.2Crude fiber 14.3 13.8 17.1 38.5 43.6Ash 102.0 82.6 80.4 74.1 69.5Nitrogen‐free extract 427.4 441.7 421.8 421.6 414.7Gross energy (MJ kg‐1) 19.5 19.9 20.2 20.1 20.2* Others included: 300.0 g kg‐1 of soybean meal, 200.0 g kg‐1 of wheat flour, 30.0 g kg‐1 of meat and bone meal, 15.0 g kg‐1 of soybean lecithin, 10.0 g kg‐1 of corn gluten meal, 10.0 g kg‐1 of vitamin‐mineral premix, 10.0 g kg‐1 of common salt, and 0.9 g kg‐1of ascorbic acid polyphosphate.
  • Amino acid profile consistent among dietsAmino acid Diets (g kg‐1, dry matter basis) CV% Subst. FM/SPC 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% (%)Alanine 19.3 18.4 18.4 17.7 19.6 4.1Arginine 23.5 23.5 24.7 24.1 25.6 3.7Aspartic acid 33.2 33.5 35.2 35.0 36.9 4.3Cystine 4.6 4.3 4.6 3.6 4.7 10.3Glycine 23.3 21.8 22.1 21.1 21.5 3.8Glutamic acid 59.6 60.3 63.9 64.0 67.6 5.1Histidine 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.2 7.2 5.7Isoleucine 16.2 15.6 16.3 16.2 16.6 2.2 22% below the Leucine 32.6 32.3 33.6 33.7 34.8 3.0 mean of 8.2 ± 1.1 g Lysine 25.6 25.2 25.6 23.9 24.8 2.8 kg‐1 found for other Methionine 8.2 7.9 7.6 7.1 9.3 10.3 dietsMethionine + cystine 12.8 12.2 12.2 10.7 14.0 9.6Phenylalanine 16.3 16.2 17.2 17.2 18.1 4.6Proline 23.6 23.2 24.6 24.2 25.5 3.7Serine 18.3 18.1 19.2 19.4 20.6 5.2Threonine 12.8 12.5 12.2 13.0 12.5 2.4Tryptophan 2.3 2.5 2.2 2.8 2.9 12.0Tyrosine 13.4 13.4 14.1 13.7 14.5 3.4Valine 18.4 17.5 17.9 18.0 18.0 1.8
  • SPC can Replace Fish Meal Effectively FINAL SHRIMP BODY WEIGHT (g) ( 4.03 ± 0.73 g; 70 shrimp/m2 clear‐water, 72‐day  a culture; 35 ± 1.6 g L‐1 salinity, 7.4 ± 0.29 pH and 28.7 ± Source: Sá et al (unpublished). 0.7oC temperature) ab ab ab87.0 ± 5.9% survival0.96 ± 0.09 g growth783 ± 92 g/m2 yield b 14.34 14.09 14.03 13.84 13.53 % Subst. FM/SPC 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% No detrimental performance was found for laboratory‐raised L. vannamei  when fish meal was partially or completely replaced by SPC in practical diets
  • Is replacement of SPC dependent of fish oil?Recent studies able to demonstrate that it is possible to fully replace fish meal by soybean meal (SBM) and other protein sourcesAuthors Amaya et al. (2007) Sookying & Davis (2011) González‐Féliz et al. (2010)Species L. vannamei L. vannamei L. vannameiSystem Outdoor, tank Outdoor, tank+pond Outdoor, tankDensity 35 pcs./m2 35‐30 pcs./m2 26 pcs./m2Diet Diets with 160 g kg‐1 of  Diets which contained  Plant‐based diets with  PBM and progressive  high levels of SBM (from  544.0 g kg‐1 SBM, 283.8 g  replacements of FM by  537.1 to 580.0 g kg‐1) as  kg‐1 whole wheat and 60.0 g  SBM primary protein kg‐1 corn gluten mealLipid Adjusted with  Diets contained from 48.3  Replaced up to 90% of  menhaden fish oil,  to as much as 58.2 g kg‐1 menhaden fish oil (lowest  from 39.6 g kg‐1 with  fish oil inclusion of 4.6 g kg‐1 of the  90 g kg‐1 FM to a  diet) using a variety of lipid  maximum of 47.2 g kg‐1 sources (mainly soybean  in diets without FM and linseed oils) Formulas have relied on high levels of fish oil and/or shrimp was reared under low stocking  densities (< 30 pcs/m2) with access to natural foods
  • Limiting fish oil to 1 and 2% dietary inclusion INGREDIENTS Diets/Composition (g kg‐1 of the diet, as is) Fish oil inclusion 20 g kg‐1 10 g kg‐1 % Subst. FM/SPC 0% 31% 61% 100% 0% 31% 61% 100% Fish meal, anchovy 120.0 85.0 50.0 0.0 120.0 85.0 50.0 0.0 Source: Sá et al (unpublished). Soy protein concentrate 0.0 38.5 77.5 133.4 0.0 38.4 77.5 133.2 Broken rice 41.5 35.1 25.8 11.9 41.5 35.4 25.9 12.7 Fish oil 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 Soybean oil 10.5 13.3 18.0 25.1 20.4 23.0 27.9 34.5 Magnesium sulfate 1.1 0.7 0.7 0.8 1.2 0.7 0.7 0.8 L‐lysine 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.7 DL‐methionine 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.4 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.4 Others* 805.7 805.7 805.7 805.7 805.7 805.7 805.7 805.7 Proximate composition (g kg ‐1 of the diet, dry matter basis) Crude protein 388.1 384.1 393.9 390.8 393.5 384.9 385.9 388.4 Crude fat 99.8 89.5 94.8 97.0 93.0 89.3 93.7 97.8 Crude fiber 14.7 17.3 17.0 19.2 17.9 15.5 13.4 17.4 Ash 104.7 97.6 96.1 88.9 105.6 97.1 94.6 91.3 Nitrogen‐free extract 392.7 411.5 398.2 404.1 390.0 413.2 412.4 405.1 Gross energy (MJ kg ‐1) 19.7 19.6 19.9 20.1 19.6 19.8 19.9 20.1 *Others included: 330.0 g kg‐1 of soybean meal, 250.0 g kg‐1 of wheat flour, 150.0 g kg‐1 of poultry by‐product meal, 20.0 g kg‐1 of vitamin‐mineral premix,  15.0 g kg‐1 of soybean lecithin, 13.0 g kg‐1 of bicalcium phosphate, 10 g kg‐1 of common salt, 10.0 g kg‐1 of potassium chloride, 7.0 g kg‐1 of synthetic  binder, 0.7 g kg‐1 of ascorbic acid polyphosphate
  • 0% 31% 61% 100% 0% 31% 61% 100% Nutritional Composition 2.0% Fish OIL 1.0% Fish OIL Essential amino acids (g/kg, dry matter basis) Lysine 23.6 24.3 24.3 25.0 23.6 24.1 24.9 25.2 Methionine 7.6 7.5 7.7 7.7 7.2 7.4 7.8 7.9 Cystine 4.1 4.9 4.3 5.1 5.0 5.2 4.3 4.3 Source: Sá et al (unpublished). Methionine + cystine 11.7 12.0 12.0 12.8 12.2 12.6 101.5 105.7 Essential Fatty Acid (g/kg, dried matter basis) Linoleic acid (18:2n‐6) 31.9 30.0 33.1 36.7 36.1 35.3 38.2 42.4 Linolenic acid (18:3n‐3) 5.2 4.4 4.9 5.2 5.1 4.9 4.7 5.0 Eicosatrienoic acid (20:3n‐3) 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 Arachidonic acid (20:4n‐6) 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.1 Eicosapentaenoic (20:5n‐3) 7.7 5.3 4.2 3.1 1.9 1.8 2.6 1.6 Docosahexaenoic (22:6n‐3) 5.8 4.3 3.5 2.9 1.7 1.6 2.2 2.1 SFA1 26.1 22.3 25.3 24.6 27.1 26.0 23.1 21.6 MUFA 2 22.2 21.1 25.7 25.4 24.5 24.9 25.6 26.0 PUFA 3 37.7 38.8 40.4 43.5 44.4 45.2 46.0 48.7 HUFA4 14.0 11.2 8.4 6.5 4.0 3.9 5.3 3.9 Total n‐35 19.2 16.0 13.6 11.9 9.5 9.5 10.4 9.1 Total n‐66 32.5 34.0 35.2 38.1 38.9 39.6 41.0 43.5 n‐3/n‐6 0.59 0.47 0.39 0.31 0.24 0.24 0.25 0.211 Saturated fatty acids: 12:0, 14:0, 15:0, 16:0, 17:0, 18:0.; 2Monounsaturated fatty acids: 16:1, 18:1; 3Polyunsaturated fatty acids: 18:2, 18:3, 20:3; 4Highly unsaturated fatty acids: 20:4, 20:5, 22:6; 5Total n‐3: 18:3, 20:3, 20:5, 22:6; 6Total n‐6: 18:2, 20:4.
  • Final shrimp body weight DIETARY INCLUSION OF FISH OIL 20 g/kg of diet FINAL SHRIMP BODY WEIGHT (g) 10 g/kg of diet ( 1.59 ± 0.46 g; 70 shrimp/m2; 48 clear‐water  Source: Sá et al (unpublished). A tanks, 72‐day culture B As much as 31%  a ab replacement of  bc C c USD786/MT FM/SPC was  USD787/MT USD774/MT USD775/MT possible with 20  D USD764/MT USD765/MT USD751/MT 7.5 g USD745/MT g/kg of fish oil.  At 1 g/kg of fish  oil, a 31%  replacement and  7.9 g 8.2 g 8.9 g 9.4 g 9.0 g 8.0 g 8.5 g beyond were  detrimental to  0% 31% 61% 100% shrimp growth % Replacement of Fish Meal for SPC (g/kg of diet)
  • Why shrimp feeds still          rely on fish meal?(1) ECONOMICS: use remains economically  competitive at strategic inclusion levels,  for specialty diets (starters, anti‐ stress/transition, premium) and certain  markets(2) CONVENIENCE: few ingredients available  capable of replacing the single value of  fish meal. It contains a highly attractive  package from the nutrition standpoint Source of multiple essential nutrients  (protein, AA, fatty acids, cholesterol,  phospholipids) Highly digestible, few anti‐nutritional  factors, feeding effectors, unidentified  growth factors(3) MARKET PERCEPTION: feeds with high  levels of fish meal are still perceived as  high performers
  • FINAL REMARKSEffective fish meal reduction in shrimp diets is dependent on methionine supplementation, source of attractants and an adequate supply of fish oil or another source of n‐3 HUFA. 1)Reduction in the dietary inclusion of fish meal beyond 8.5% with 2% fish oil led to a detriment in shrimp growth performance.2)When a source of attractants was incorporated to the diet at 2%,levels as low as 5% was possible without loss in growth 3)At 1% fish oil, no reduction in fish meal was possible when 1% fish oil was used.4)Whenever dietary fat was adjusted by using FO as a lipid source,complete replacement of FM was achieved with no negative effect on shrimp growth.
  • AcknowledgementsFinancial supportEMBRAPA ‐ Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária Brazilian Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture (MPA)Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq/MCT;  research productivity fellowship PQ No. 300453/2009‐4).Co‐workers Dr. Marcelo Sá, Hassan Sabry‐Neto, students and staff at LABOMAR, Brazil