Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
An Introduction to Mentoring and the Alberta Mentoring Partnership
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

An Introduction to Mentoring and the Alberta Mentoring Partnership

568
views

Published on

The Alberta Mentoring Partnership - AMP is a partnership of government ministries, community mentoring organizations, and youth representation working together to raise the profile of mentoring in …

The Alberta Mentoring Partnership - AMP is a partnership of government ministries, community mentoring organizations, and youth representation working together to raise the profile of mentoring in Alberta. AMP exists to help community mentoring programs meet the needs of the children and youth they serve.

This Power Point Presentation has been designed for use by the Alberta Mentoring Partnership (AMP) Leadership Team, Staff, and community champions. It highlights the definition of mentoring, the benefit and impact of mentoring relationships, who AMP is and what AMP does, and the tools and resources available through AMP to support mentoring programs.

http://albertamentors.ca

Published in: Education

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
568
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • This Power Point Presentation has been designed for use by the Alberta Mentoring Partnership (AMP) Leadership Team, Staff, and community champions. It highlights the definition of mentoring, the benefit and impact of mentoring relationships, who AMP is and what AMP does, and the tools and resources available through AMP to support mentoring programs.
    Welcome. Introduce yourself and your role with AMP.
  • AMP is a collaboration of community mentoring organizations, government ministries and youth representation working together to raise the profile of mentoring in Alberta. AMP exists to help community mentoring programs meet the needs of the children and youth they serve.
    AMP brings together government ministries, government-funded organizations, community agencies and youth representation to address the need for strong mentoring organizations in Alberta. Launched in June 2008, the Partnership is co-chaired by Alberta Human Services, Alberta Education, and Boys and Girls Clubs Big Brothers Big Sisters of Edmonton & Area.
    Mentoring is widely recognized as providing a positive contribution to building strong, safe and healthy communities. When young people have positive role models, they have improved attitudes about school, are less likely to display volatile behaviours, and have better peer and family relationships. Strong mentoring programs support Alberta’s youth to develop confidence, self-esteem and positive social skills.
  • The Vision of the Alberta Mentoring Partnership is that every child or youth who needs a mentor has access to a mentor.
    We hope that you become a part of this vision today!
    AMP’s Mission is to grow sustainable mentoring across Alberta through a shared services approach.
  • AMP formally began in 2008 and is now in Phase III of its work. The Phase III (2014-2017) Objectives are:
    1. Increase mentoring across the province.
    2. Continue to increase community and organizational capacity for mentoring.
    3. Develop and support a collective impact approach to ensure the ongoing relevance, efficiency and effectiveness of AMP.
    4. Establish a repository of research and knowledge on mentoring.
  • AMP seeks to address some of these issues:
    There are thousands of students in our province who could benefit from having a significant adult presence in their lives.
    Many Albertans are not aware of the powerful benefits of mentoring.
    There is a shortage of volunteers.
    Mentoring is widely recognized as providing a positive contribution to building strong, safe and healthy communities. When young people have positive adult role models, they have improved attitudes about school, are less likely to display volatile behaviours, and have better peer and family relationships.
    A strong mentorship program will help Alberta’s youth develop the confidence, self-esteem and social skills they need to be productive members of society.
  • Video demonstrates what mentoring is, the benefits, and speaks about AMP.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=1P9JG4U-38A
  • The Alberta Mentoring Partnership defines mentoring as….
    Mentoring is the presence of a caring individual who provides a young person with support, advice, friendship, reinforcement and constructive role-modelling over time.
  • Mentoring Comes in many different forms.
    PROGRAM VARIATIONS:
    One-to-One: matches 1 mentor in a relationship with 1 child or youth
    Group: Matches 1 mentor with a small group of children or young people
    Team: Matches several mentors working with a small group of children or young people
    Teen: Matches teens as mentors with younger students – 1-to-1 or group or team
    E-mentoring: Matches a mentor with a youth on the internet, by phone or through social networks
    PROGRAM FOCUS
    SOCIAL SKILLS or personal Mentoring: focus aimed at supporting a particular population to address issues common to group (ie – ethnic group, behavior, single parent) OR supporting individuals through a time of change/development.
    TRANSITIONS: in big life transitions – Jr to Sr High, New to Canada, etc.
    CAREER: focus to assist child/youth/group to acquire skills and knowledge needed to advance to or begin on a career path
    CULTURAL: focus to share customs, values and practices of a specific culture, tradition or group
    ACADEMIC: focus is directly or indirectly aimed at improving academic performance of child/youth/group, or for teaching specific information or skills
    Also consider location/setting:
    In-school
    Off-site (note jurisdiction & Alberta Ed Off Campus policies)
    E-Mentoring (note due diligence – when can mentor/mentee contact happen?)
    After School
  • Both forms of mentoring (informal and formal) are valuable and important, but they do have some differences.
  • There are basically three types of mentoring experiences that can be found in schools and communities. The first two are formal mentoring programs, either house in schools or out in the community. The third is a more informal and natural type of mentoring, where mentoring as an integral aspect of the activity (eg. Coaching a team) but it is not specifically a mentoring program.
    It is beneficial for schools to examine ways to develop mentoring activities into stronger, more intentional and more defined mentoring programs that can provide leaders and role-models to support students in becoming healthy, well-educated and resilient members of society.
  • Why is Mentoring so important?
  • Some research studies that back this up:
    http://www.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca/en/home/newsevents/investinginkidsfuturespaysoff.aspx
    http://albertamentors.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Mentoring-a-Review-of-the-Literature.pdf
    http://www.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca/en/home/newsevents/100yearcelebrationStudy.aspx
  • The Impact of Mentoring on Canada’s Youth; preliminary results from A Longitudinal Analysis of the Effects of Adult Mentoring on Children’s Health and Well-being: An Examination of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Community Match Program led by David J. De Wit Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, London, Ontario, retrieved from
    http://www.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca/en/home/newsevents/100yearcelebrationStudy.aspx
  • http://www.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca/en/home/newsevents/100yearcelebrationStudy.aspx
  • http://www.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca/en/home/newsevents/investinginkidsfuturespaysoff.aspx
  • Note: All tools and resources are free or charge.
  • As of February 2014, AMP had 95 partners.
    Partners are organizations, agencies, groups, and schools who run mentoring programs for children and/or youth in Alberta.
    Visit the AMP website to submit a partnership application. The application involves sharing some information about your organization and your programs, as well as meeting a set of criteria.
    Some of the benefits of partnership include:
    An online profile to showcase your organization on the AMP website.
    Entry in our ‘Find a Mentoring Opportunity in your Community’ search engine, where potential volunteers in your community can find you.
    Access to a user-friendly Online Volunteer Application system.
    Inclusion in networking and learning opportunities.
    We are always here to help! AMP employs four staff throughout the Province with unique skills to support your needs. This could include: Presentations about the benefits of mentoring; in-person mentor training; demonstration of the various tools available through AMP.
    Full access to the vast resources available through AMP to create, sustain, and expand quality mentoring experiences, including the online Mentor and Mentee training, Outline to create a Mentoring Program, and Strength-Based Mentoring documents.
    The opportunity to influence the direction of mentorship in Alberta. Become a part of the mentorship movement!
  • An online Mentor and Mentee Training is available through AMP.
    The online Mentor Training provides an overview for Mentors: History of Mentoring, How to be a Mentor, The mentoring relationship (dynamics and guidelines), types of mentoring programs. Mentors complete the training, do a quiz, and obtain a certificate.
    The online Mentee Training provides an overview of mentoring relationships for children in grades 1-6 . It covers: What is a Mentor? What is a Mentee?, Getting to know your mentor, Boundaries and Safety, Strengths; also creates an “all about me” booklet to give the program coordinator and mentor some additional info about the child.
  • Resources available online for creating a quality mentoring program.
    Lists step-by-step what to consider when you’re building a new mentoring program.
  • Mentor Training Event Toolkit
    Resources and outline to guide you in creating a Training Event for mentors. Includes a Power Point Presentation for in-person mentor training sessions.
  • CTS Credited courses are available for high schools in the Health, Recreation, and Human Services cluster, Human and Social Services section, in the CTS Pathways.
  • Additional AMP Resources include topics such as: High School Teen Mentoring, Strenght-Based Mentoring, Mentoring in Aboriginal Communities.
    There are many additional resources available on the AMP Website. We encourage you to check them out!
  • Transcript

    • 1. An Introduction to Mentoring and the Alberta Mentoring Partnership 1
    • 2. Alberta Mentoring Partnership (AMP) AMP is a partnership of government ministries, community mentoring organizations, and youth representation working together to raise the profile of mentoring in Alberta. AMP exists to help community mentoring programs meet the needs of the children and youth they serve. 2
    • 3. Alberta Mentoring Partnership (AMP) Vision: Every child or youth who needs a mentor has access to a mentor. Mission: Grow sustainable mentoring across Alberta through a shared services approach. 3
    • 4. Objectives of AMP Phase III: 2014-2017 • 1. Increase mentoring across the province. • 2. Continue to increase community and organizational capacity for mentoring. • • • • 3. Develop and support a collective impact approach to ensure the ongoing relevance, efficiency and effectiveness of AMP. • 4. Establish a repository of research and knowledge on mentoring. 4
    • 5. Alberta Mentoring Partnership (AMP)  There are thousands of students in our province who could benefit from having a significant adult presence in their lives.  Many Albertans are not aware of the powerful benefits of mentoring.  There is a shortage of volunteers. 5
    • 6. Alberta Mentoring Partnership (AMP) 6
    • 7. Mentoring is the presence of a caring individual who provides a young person with support, advice, friendship, reinforcement and constructive rolemodelling over time. Mentoring is about building relationships. 7
    • 8. FOCUS VARIATION Mentoring Types 8
    • 9. Mentoring Types 9
    • 10. Mentoring Frameworks Traditional Community-Based Formal Mentoring Program • Mentoring Organization • Matched and supervised Mentors & Mentees • Outside Regular School Day School Based Formal Mentoring Program • Partnership with a Mentoring Organization • Teen & Peer Mentoring Programs • During School Day Informal Mentoring • Character Education & Social Skills Programs • Career Awareness & Explorations • Cross-Age Projects • Leadership Program Activities • School Transition Practices • Ethnic & Cultural Activities • Athletic Teams & Sports Activities • Homework Clubs • Literacy Projects • Parent/Community Volunteer Activities • After-school groups (eg. Boys & Girls Clubs, 4-H, Junior Achievement, Athletic Clubs, etc) 10
    • 11. Mentoring is Powerful! • Mentoring is a powerful way of supporting a young person by teaching skills, listening to their perspectives and fostering in them a sense of belonging. 11
    • 12. Benefits of Mentoring  Positive impact on school attendance, social skills, attitude and behaviour with friends and family.  Helps prevent involvement in alcohol, drugs and crime. 12
    • 13. Critical Components of Positive Change An analysis of 40 years of research found the best predictor of successful change are two factors: 1) engagement in meaningful relationship 2) engagement in meaningful activities 83% of change involves these two factors 17% is a result of technique (Miller & Duncan, 1997)
    • 14. Benefits to Children and Youth1 14
    • 15. BBBS and CAMH Largest Mentoring Study in Canada (January, 2013) • Key findings:  Girls with a Big Sister are two and a half times more likely than girls without a mentor to be confident in their ability to be successful at school.  Girls in the study with a Big Sister were four times less likely to bully, fight, lie or express anger than girls without a mentor.  Boys with a Big Brother are three times less likely than boys without a mentor to suffer peer pressure related anxiety, such as worrying about what other children think or say about them.  Mentored boys are two times more likely to believe that school is fun and that doing well academically is important.  Mentored boys are also two times less likely than non-mentored boys to develop negative conducts like bullying, fighting, lying, cheating, losing their temper or expressing anger. 15
    • 16. 16
    • 17. • www.albertamentors.ca • Houses lots of helpful tools and resources for Mentoring Programs and Mentors. 17
    • 18. Become an AMP Partner! Visit www.albertamentors.ca Click on “Apply for Partnership with AMP” Complete and submit the application. 18
    • 19. Online Mentor & Mentee Training www.albertamentors.ca 19
    • 20. Create a Mentoring Program Toolkit www.albertamentors.ca 20
    • 21. Mentor Training Event Toolkit www.albertamentors.ca 21
    • 22. The Five CTS Mentoring Courses Course HSS1050: Introduction to Mentorship Course HSS2050: Becoming a Mentor Course HSS3060: Extending the Mentoring Relationship Course HSS3070: Peer Mentoring Course HSS3050: Becoming a Mentee 22
    • 23. Additional Resources www.albertamentors.ca 23
    • 24. For more information, please contact:: • Add your contact information here, or include AMP’s contact information: • Alberta Mentoring Partnership • www.albertamentors.ca • mentor.resource@albertamentors.ca Follow the Alberta Mentoring Partnership on… 24
    • 25. 25