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Sunscreen (Conceptual Design)
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Sunscreen (Conceptual Design)

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  • 1. Sunscreen Challenge A conceptual design by Alan Viverette Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Design Challenge Get people to apply sunscreen every day.
  • 2. Sunscreen Challenge
    • Persuasive Purpose
      • To get people to apply sunscreen every day.
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
    • Industrial Design
  • 3. User Description
      • Former roommate, John Blessing
        • Wakes up late but still takes time to use hair product & moisturizer
        • Does not currently use sunscreen
        • Has an Android-powered smartphone
        • Uses RSS, Twitter, & Facebook
      • Friend, Raffi Mardirosian
        • Wakes up with enough time to gel hair
        • Does not currently use sunscreen
        • Has an iPhone, checks it religiously
        • Uses RSS, Blogger, & Facebook
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 4. John's Daily Routine Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu During class, John checks his email and sees a message from Sunscreen Challenge asking if he applied sunscreen. He clicks the YES link. When John gets back from class, he checks his Facebook page and sees that he has gained a point in the Sunscreen Challenge. John wakes up at 10:45am even though he has class at 11am. He jumps in the shower and starts his morning ritual. Out of the shower, John combs his hair and brushes his teeth. He glances at the Sunscreen Challenge note on his mirror. Reminded that sunscreen is important, John grabs the bottle from next to his toothpaste and applies a small amount. Once the Challenge is over, John still has the half-full sunscreen bottle next to his toothpaste. He keeps using it out of habit.
  • 5. Prototype of Sunscreen Challenge Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 6. Features/Functionality
      • Participants sign up for (or are solicited to enter) the Sunscreen Challenge
      • Free bottles of sunscreen are distributed with static-cling notes for bathroom mirrors
        • Sunscreen bottles are much larger than needed for duration of challenge
      • Participants reply to emails each day asking whether they applied sunscreen
      • System tags participant in visual progress indicator which appears on Facebook
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 7. Theoretical Justifications
      • Context-based habits
        • Associate applying sunscreen with the bathroom environment
      • Piggybacking existing habits
        • Make applying sunscreen part of the existing morning routine
      • Targeting an easy market
        • People who already use bathroom products, use smart phones and Facebook
      • High ability
        • Provide sunscreen as part of the pilot
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 8. Results of User Testing
      • Participants are not happy having Sunscreen Challenge show up on other people's newsfeed
        • Could go back to using RSS for private usage
      • Suggesting participants keep and use sunscreen bottle in bathroom is effective
      • Social pressure isn't a factor in sunscreen usage (like it would be with dieting or charity)
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 9. Shortcomings of Design
      • Users seem reluctant to have Sunscreen Challenge show up on their Facebook page
        • Maybe makes it sound like they have a skin condition?
      • Too many images are necessary for individual progress tracking
        • Could use Twitter tags instead
        • Or a single image for each day
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 10. Expansion - What else is possible?
      • Use a pop-up dialog on smartphone for confirmation of behavior
        • Could be applied to formation of any habit, but has high entry cost of installing an application
      • Use a text message as a trigger rather than a mirror sticky
        • Increases ability to respond that behavior has been performed
      • Use channels other than Facebook for motivation
        • Twitter?
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 11. Next Steps in Design Process
      • Design static cling for reminding participants to apply sunscreen
      • Find a target audience that wouldn't mind Facebook tagging
      • Put together a Google form for response tracking
    Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  • 12. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation of Design Project How well does the idea reflect concepts from class? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does the design match the design brief? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How viable/convincing is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  • 13. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation continued… How well could this solution scale to reach many? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does this document communicate? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bonus Points How insightful is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  • 14. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Additional Comments: Overall remarks or additional comments here