Starcraft Habit Formation

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Starcraft Habit Formation

  1. 1. how do we get<br />engineers <br />to go outside<br />more often?<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  2. 2. what else are they doing in<br />their free time?<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  3. 3. Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  4. 4. so why is it so popular<br />and going outside isn’t?<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  5. 5. step 1<br />forming the game playing habit<br />(why the game is attractive)<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  6. 6. visually attractive<br />the first glimpse people have of the game is<br />how it looks – and that is “pretty”<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  7. 7. spreads virally<br />when friends play, their friends play, and a single<br />purchase can be used for multiple computers<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  8. 8. people are already hooked<br />builds on an already successful franchise with<br />over 9.5 million copies sold since 1998<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  9. 9. step 2<br />strengthening the habit<br />(why people play)<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  10. 10. high availability<br />the game lives on the computer desktop, which is<br />where the player spends most of their time<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  11. 11. predictable timing<br />games are short, lasting ten to twenty minutes, and<br />players can easily estimate how much time is left<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  12. 12. competition<br />the point of the game is to win, which equates to a<br />randomly-scheduled operant conditioning reward<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  13. 13. step 3<br />maintaining the habit<br />(why people keep playing)<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  14. 14. public ranking system<br />since players compete within their bracket, the<br />game’s difficulty level is never too high<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  15. 15. tiered difficulty levels<br />every time you play, you visibly increase your<br />skill level and can play against better opponents<br />Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />
  16. 16. in summary:<br /><ul><li>attract newcomers by making the habit visually attractive, social network-based, and by basing it on existing habits
  17. 17. strengthen the habit by making it readily available, breakable into small and predictable time units, and making it competitive
  18. 18. maintain the habit by incentivizing it, let users increase rank or gain points</li></ul>Alan Viverette<br />habits.stanford.edu<br />

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