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Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
Bad ideas Konstanz 2011
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Bad ideas Konstanz 2011

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Slides accompanying Bad Ideas session at Konstantz retreat. Initial slides are intro to the hands on session Geoff and I facilitated, and the later ones my presentation of the theoretical …

Slides accompanying Bad Ideas session at Konstantz retreat. Initial slides are intro to the hands on session Geoff and I facilitated, and the later ones my presentation of the theoretical underpinnings.

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  • Transcript

    • 1. bad ideas Geoff Ellis & Alan Dix Lancaster University & Talis & Lingards Cross Farm
    • 2. group challenge <ul><li>think of a bad / silly idea </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. inflatable dartboard, chocolate teapot </li></ul>
    • 3. prompts … <ul><li>THE BAD </li></ul><ul><li>1 what is bad about this idea? </li></ul><ul><li>2 why is this a bad thing? </li></ul><ul><li>3 are there any other things that share this feature but are not bad? </li></ul><ul><li>4 if so what is the difference? </li></ul><ul><li>try different contexts </li></ul><ul><li>used car salesman – how would you sell it to someone? </li></ul><ul><li>THE GOOD </li></ul><ul><li>1 what is good about this idea? </li></ul><ul><li>2 why is this a good thing? </li></ul><ul><li>3 anything that shares this feature but is not good? </li></ul><ul><li>4 if so what is the difference? </li></ul>
    • 4. make it a good idea <ul><li>What is good - keep it </li></ul><ul><li>What is bad - change it </li></ul><ul><li>Change context </li></ul><ul><li>Learn from aspects </li></ul>
    • 5. why bad ideas?
    • 6. why bad ideas? <ul><li>training: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>low commitment => easier to critique </li></ul></ul><ul><li>design: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>large jumps through the design space </li></ul></ul>Good Ideas ? ?
    • 7. why bad ideas? <ul><li>training: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>low commitment => easier to critique </li></ul></ul><ul><li>design: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>large jumps through the design space </li></ul></ul>Bad Ideas
    • 8. why bad ideas? <ul><li>training: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>low commitment => easier to critique </li></ul></ul><ul><li>design: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>large jumps through the design space </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>understanding of the design space </li></ul></ul>Bad Ideas Meta-level dimensions criteria properties
    • 9. plus ... <ul><li>other divergent techniques: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>random metaphors, putting ideas together </li></ul></ul><ul><li>arbitrary constraints: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>time, materials, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>externalisation </li></ul><ul><li>personality prostheses </li></ul>
    • 10. critical transitions and generating examples
    • 11. critical transitions and bad ideas <ul><li>good uses of bad feature: “what’s the difference” </li></ul><ul><li>similar yet critical difference (good/bad) </li></ul><ul><li>helps articulate (externalisation) : dimensions, facets, concepts, criteria </li></ul><ul><li>general technique ... </li></ul>
    • 12. critical transitions <ul><li>construct a boundary case … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>example A in category, example B not in category </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>make ‘path of small changes from A to B </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>where does it ‘cross’ the boundary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>good for ‘felt’ categories </li></ul></ul>in category not in category A B critical transition
    • 13. boundaries <ul><li>where the action is (wild west, sea shore) </li></ul><ul><li>reductionist – define and delineate </li></ul><ul><li>intuitive – life is fuzzy, categories meaningless </li></ul><ul><li>a different way </li></ul><ul><li>define and delineate – for what you learn not the result </li></ul><ul><li>wholeheartedly seek but hold lightly the outcome </li></ul>
    • 14. but how to find examples? <ul><li>generating examples – hard </li></ul><ul><li>examples from experience easy ??? or is it ??? </li></ul>past now old concept experience need
    • 15. but how to find examples? <ul><li>generating examples – hard </li></ul><ul><li>examples from experience easy ??? or is it ??? </li></ul>past now new concept experience need generate example similar surface characteristics
    • 16. but how to find examples? <ul><li>generating examples – hard </li></ul><ul><li>examples from experience ... actually harder! </li></ul><ul><li>but .. generating examples ... </li></ul><ul><li>take arbitrary concrete example </li></ul><ul><li>morph to new concept </li></ul><ul><li>constant concrete – abstract movement </li></ul>
    • 17. externalisation
    • 18. different kinds <ul><li>drawings and sketches </li></ul><ul><li>models </li></ul><ul><li>diagrams </li></ul><ul><li>mathematical formulae </li></ul><ul><li>spoken words (learn to listen to yourself) </li></ul><ul><li>written words (on paper, or screen) </li></ul><ul><li>computer programs </li></ul><ul><li>acting </li></ul>
    • 19. why externalise? <ul><li>informational </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>passing on to others already formed ideas </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>formational </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ideas become clearer by the process of externalisation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>transformational </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>thinking using materials </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>transcendental </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>our thoughts and ideas become the object of thought </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 20. informational passing on to others already formed ideas
    • 21. formational ideas become clearer by the process of externalisation
    • 22. transformational thinking using materials c.f. external/distributed cognition e.g. measure length on diagram
    • 23. transcendental our thoughts and ideas become the object of thought
    • 24. multiple classifications
    • 25. why multiple classifications? <ul><li>taxonomy: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>things </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>circles </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>red circles </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>yellow circles </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>squares </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>red squares </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>yellow squares </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>similarity clear similarity obscured
    • 26. multiple classification <ul><ul><li>shapes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>circles </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>squares </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>colours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>red </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>yellow </li></ul></ul></ul>shape colour red yellow circle square tell you in what ways things are similar and in what whay they differ
    • 27. using multi-classifications <ul><li>to spread literature search </li></ul>X
    • 28. using multi-classifications <ul><li>to spread literature search </li></ul><ul><li>to identify gaps </li></ul>somat or other thing- amibob somat else ?
    • 29. using multi-classifications <ul><li>to spread literature search </li></ul><ul><li>to identify gaps </li></ul><ul><li>to discover trends </li></ul>thing- amibob somat else ? ?
    • 30. using multi-classifications <ul><li>to spread literature search </li></ul><ul><li>to identify gaps </li></ul><ul><li>to discover trends </li></ul><ul><li>to uncover abstractions </li></ul>somat or other thing- amibob somat else different again ? ?
    • 31. using multi-classifications <ul><li>to spread literature search </li></ul><ul><li>to identify gaps </li></ul><ul><li>to discover trends </li></ul><ul><li>to uncover abstractions </li></ul><ul><li>to synthesise solutions </li></ul>somat or other thing- amibob somat else ?
    • 32. personality prostheses
    • 33. a researcher is …
    • 34. a researcher is … <ul><li>interested </li></ul><ul><li>active </li></ul><ul><li>confused </li></ul><ul><li>geek </li></ul><ul><li>optimist </li></ul><ul><li>organised </li></ul><ul><li>diligent </li></ul><ul><li>insightful </li></ul><ul><li>fluent </li></ul><ul><li>creative </li></ul>
    • 35. imagine …
    • 36. selling cars … <ul><li>make pink cars </li></ul><ul><li>make people like pink </li></ul>thnx 2 flickr: zwierz, foxp2, texassadie, lightpainter
    • 37. eShopping <ul><li>requirement: plan a week’s food in advance </li></ul><ul><li>make people organised </li></ul>thnx: http://www.carolyn.topmum.net/tutbury/church/church.htm DAY TIME FOOD QTY Mon 7:45 grapefruit 1/2 tin Mon 7:45 tea cup Mon 10:30 choc. bsct 3 Mon 10:30 coffee 2 cups
    • 38. why do it to yourself! <ul><li>research ... </li></ul><ul><li>the goal/outcome is fixed ( sort of ) </li></ul><ul><li>the process involves you </li></ul>GOAL papers data thesis argument
    • 39. who you are <ul><li>physical capabilities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>maybe go to the gym </li></ul></ul><ul><li>cognitive capabilities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>maybe take evening classes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>personality and cognitive style </li></ul><ul><ul><li>time management, tidiness, divergent, convergent thinking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>slow/hard to change if possible ... and do you want to? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>often treated as moral failure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>only ever apologise for what you do, never who you are </li></ul></ul>
    • 40. <ul><li>http://www.flickr.com/photos/jakerome/2241606732/ </li></ul>
    • 41. tools to help you given who you are (NOT to change who you are) <ul><li>physical prosthesis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>forklift </li></ul></ul><ul><li>cognitive prosthesis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>calculator </li></ul></ul><ul><li>personality prosthesis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>N.B. Csíkszentmihályi – creative thinkers extreme at both ends of personality traits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>convergent thinker – bad idea helps divergence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>divergent thinker – prompts help convergence </li></ul></ul>
    • 42. <ul><li>don’t say: if only I were like X I could reach my (research) goals </li></ul><ul><li>do ask: given the way I am how do I do things </li></ul>
    • 43. bad ideas prompts externalisation explicit design space critical transitions divergence convergence examples (multiple) classifications boundaries personality prosthesis breaking bounds commitment

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