Towards a better understanding of Social Machines
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Towards a better understanding of Social Machines

on

  • 889 views

My talk for RPI Cognitive Department, March 31st, 2010

My talk for RPI Cognitive Department, March 31st, 2010

Statistics

Views

Total Views
889
Views on SlideShare
888
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
5
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Towards a better understanding of Social Machines Towards a better understanding of Social Machines Presentation Transcript

    • Towards a better understanding of Social Machines Alvaro Graves
    • Outline
      • Part 1: Cognitive processes involve (sometimes) the use of the Web
      • Part 2: The Web can (sometimes) be enhanced by the human mind
      • Part 3: Our current initiatives to study this interaction
    • <part1> <!-- The Web in Cognition -->
    • Cognition is not only in the mind
      • The Extended Mind (Clark & Chalmers, 1998)
        • “ ... beliefs can be constituted partly by features of the environment”
        • Otto's notebook
      • Organism-Centered Cognition (Clark, 2007)
        • Cognitive process extended to the environment
        • However, centered in the organism
    • Cognition and the Web
      • Cognitive Extension and the Web. ( Smart et al., 2009)
          • Otto's Web-based notebook?
      • “ Wikipedia is down, I'm ignorant again ”
      • A. Cadiz, 2010
    • Conditions for Cognition
      • If Web is part of Cognition, several conditions must be fulfilled:
      • Availability (reliable and invoked frequently)
      • Trust (information as trustworthy as bio-memory)
      • Accessibility (can obtain information efficiently)
      • Conscious endorsement (information endorsed in the past)
    • Availability criterion
      • More and more people take action after consulting the Web
      • Increased ubiquity of the Web
        • Laptops
        • Cellphones
        • Game consoles
        • TV
        • Refrigerators
    • Trust criterion
      • Google Maps?
        • Grocery shops in Troy, NY.
        • GMaps shows me how to get there
      • Medical information from PubMed?
    • Accessibility criterion
      • “ Wristwatch example ” (Clark, 2003)
        • Do you know what time is it?
      • Information doesn't need to be consciously known
      • However is important to being able to (efficiently) access it.
      • Access Wikipedia?
    • Conscious endorsement
      • A weak criterion (Clark, 2008)
        • What about implicit knowledge?
      • User-provided content
        • Revisiting articles
        • My Weblog
    • Conclusions part 1
      • Can be part of cognitive processes
        • Not all the Web
        • Not all the time
      • However it seems this is becoming more and more part of it.
    • </part1>
    • <part2> <!-- Cognition in the Web -->
    • Motivation
      • Lots of human computational power
      • 9 billion human-hours of solitaire were played in 2003
        • Empire state building, 7 million human-hours (6.8 hours of Solitare)
        • Panama canal, 20 million human-hours (less than a day of Solitare)
    • Social Machines
      • Social Machines are mechanisms where:
        • Humans do the creative work
        • Machines do the administrative work
    • What are we good at? Humans Computers Discover patterns Good Bad Creative thinking Good Bad Information Management Bad Good Data communication Bad Good
    • Types of Social Machines
      • There is a range of mechanisms available, but we can classify them in two groups (Haythornthwaite, 2009)
        • Heavyweight
        • Lightweight
    • Heavyweight
      • Smaller audience, long-term commitment, democratic/meritocratic
      • Examples:
        • Wikipedia
        • F/OSS projects
        • W3C Working groups
        • Fansub groups
    • Lightweight
      • Bigger audience, short-term commitment, non-democratic
      • Examples:
        • Fold.it (http://fold.it)
        • ReCaptcha (http://recaptcha.net/)
        • GalaxyZoo (http://www.galaxyzoo.org/)
    • Conclusions part 2
      • Different types of Social Machines
        • Heavyweight
        • Lightweight
      • Human cognition is key in these Social Machines
    • </part2>
    • <part3> <!-- How to study SM -->
    • How to study this phenomenon?
      • Limitations
        • Access to information (logs, database)
        • Privacy concerns
      • Solution
        • Create framework for Social Machines
        • Incentives are important
    • Motivation 1: Public Safety
      • Interest for individuals, policy makers, law-enforcers
      • Provide “official” information (TroyPD, RPI public safety)
      • Also allow users to include relevant information
      • Enable establishing trust relations between users and belief on data
    • PublicSafetyMap.org
    • Next steps
      • Annotation on events
      • Ability to put ANYTHING with geolocation
      • Connect with well-known social networks (Facebook, MySpace, etc...)
    • Motivation 2: Geoannotation
      • User can mark areas (polygons) in a map (Sage bldg., my office, home, etc...)
      • Allow users to operate and search over these polygons
      • “ Give me all chinese restaurant that delivers to my place”
    • Conclusions part 3
      • Don't compete with Google
      • Opening data so others can use it for their own applications
      • But most important: A Framework where we can study Social Machines
    • </part3>
    • <conclusions>
    • Conclusions
      • Cognition is (sometimes) related to the Web
      • Web2.0 has made available incipient Social Machines
      • What can we do with Web3.0 technologies?
      • How to improve trust, collaboration, privacy, efficiency in this and new SM's?
    • </conclusions> <questions/>
    • <references/>
      • Clark and Chalmers. The extended mind. Analysis (1998) vol. 58 (1) pp. 7-19
      • Clark. Curing cognitive hiccups: A defense of the extended mind . (2007)
      • Smart et al. Cognitive Extension and the Web . (2009)
      • Clark. Natural-born cyborgs: Minds, technologies, and the future of human intelligence . (2003)
      • Clark. Supersizing the mind: embodiment, action, and cognitive extension , 2008
      • Hendler and Berners-Lee. From the Semantic Web to social machines: A research challenge for AI on the World Wide Web . Artificial Intelligence (2010) vol. 174 (2) pp. 156-161