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Grammar Roadshow Slides
 

Grammar Roadshow Slides

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Part of a new course I am now running on grammar skills. These slides operate in conjunction with a workbook and a set of short quizzes. The aim is to dovetail a methodical treatment of core ...

Part of a new course I am now running on grammar skills. These slides operate in conjunction with a workbook and a set of short quizzes. The aim is to dovetail a methodical treatment of core grammatical themes with a \'need-to-know\' conversational approach. I never run these slides in sequence from beginning to end; instead, we move around within the set as the learners\' questions dictate. The length of the roadshow varies from 90 minutes to half a day.

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    Grammar Roadshow Slides Grammar Roadshow Slides Presentation Transcript

    • Welcome to The Grammar Roadshow Alan Barker Kairos Training Limited
    • What is grammar?
      • The rules controlling the way a language works
    • From grammar to glamour
    • Round 1
      • A
      • light
      • sentence
    • Spot the sentences
      • To set the scene.
      • Picasso was a great artist.
      • The reason being that we can’t afford it.
      • Although it is relatively early days and providers are only gradually coming to use this system, the results of this initiative have been impressive.
      • In other words, whether time could be better spent, or risks reduced, by doing other things.
    • A sentence is:
      • a group of words coming between a capital letter and a full stop
      • a group of words making complete sense
      • a group of words containing a subject and a finite verb
    • Subject and predicate
      • Your book is over there.
      • Dr Persaud will see you now.
      • Timescales have been an issue for years.
    • Hunt for the subject
      • How well is the product promoted?
      • It’s not clear at this stage which clients will benefit.
      • There is a restaurant around the corner.
      • Sign on the dotted line.
    • Three kinds of sentence
      • Simple
      • Compound
      • Complex
    • Simple sentences
      • We set the standards for the industry.
      • These decisions will ensure that the client’s individual circumstances are taken care of.
      • Our portfolio of products and services is constantly evolving to reflect the dynamics of the industry and our clients’ changing needs.
    • Compound sentences
      • The storm brought down all the power lines and caused havoc throughout the city.
      • The industry has adapted but customers still find many products hard to use.
      • Our new model is more efficient because it uses less fuel.
    • Complex sentences
      • Because it uses less fuel, the new model is more efficient.
      • If the company fails to make a profit this year, we shall be forced to make compulsory redundancies.
      • Although providers are only gradually coming to use the system, the results of this initiative have been impressive.
    • Misplaced modifiers
      • We have a parrot in a cage that talks.
      • We saw very few signposts wandering around Ireland.
      • Send us your ideas for growing roses on a postcard.
      • Last night Sue went to see Elton John in a new dress.
    • Round 2
      • Can you
      • get the
      • parts…?
    • Parts of speech
      • Parts of speech are classes of word, classified by how they are used.
      • Can you name any parts of speech?
    • Eight parts of speech
      • ( - or maybe nine)
      noun verb adjective adverb pronoun preposition conjunction article (determiner) interjection
    • What part of speech?
      • She bought us all a round of drinks.
      • He has a round face.
      • Take care when you round the corner.
      • We drove round the town looking for somewhere to park.
      • Gather round !
      • [noun]
      [adjective]
      • [verb]
      • [preposition]
      • [adverb]
    • Round 3
      • Name
      • that
      • noun!
    • Common nouns
      • apple
      • bread
      • candle
      • dog
      • egg
      • funnel
      • grit
    • Proper nouns
      • January
      • Spain
      • George
      • Hoover
      • Sunday
      • (but spring, summer, autumn, winter)
    • Abstract nouns
      • action
      • banishment
      • collaboration
      • decision
      • enlargement
      • feasibility
      • graduation
      • honesty
      initiative justice kleptomania liquidation measurement narration observation performance
    • Nominalisation
      • Creating an abstract noun from a verb, adjective or adverb
    • For example:
      • Our product range has expanded over the past year.
      • Over the past year, there has been an expansion in our product range.
    • For example:
      • Managers have used the system a lot more since May.
      • There has been a significant increase in usage of the system by managers since May.
    • Denominalise!
      • We shall make a decision next week.
      • We shall decide next week.
    • Denominalise!
      • The implementation of the project was undertaken by a small team.
      • A small team implemented the project.
    • Denominalise!
      • AEGON UK plc conducted a survey with advisers at the end of last year.
      • AEGON UK plc surveyed advisers at the end of last year.
    • Mass nouns
      • - are nouns that cannot take
      • an indefinite article
      • (a , an )
      • and cannot be plural
    • Mass nouns
      • music
      • bread
      • poetry
      • cement
      • luck
      • training
      • leisure
    • What’s wrong?
    • It gets everywhere…
    • ‘ less’ and ‘fewer’
      • Less of amount;
      • fewer of number.
    • ‘ less’ and ‘fewer’
      • Less music; fewer tunes
      • Less bread; fewer loaves
      • Less poetry; fewer poems
      • Less cement; fewer slabs
      • Less training; fewer courses
    • ‘ less’ and ‘fewer’
      • We have customers than last year.
      fewer
    • ‘ less’ and ‘fewer’
      • If you do this, you’ll make
      • mistakes.
      fewer
    • ‘ less’ and ‘fewer’
      • The interview will take not than 15 minutes.
      less
    • ‘ less’ and ‘fewer’
      • As a result of the scheme, we have seen
      • traffic in the centre of London.
      • Cameras have recorded vehicles entering the zone since the scheme began.
      less fewer
    • Collective nouns
      • - are nouns naming collections or groups
    • Collective nouns
      • audience
      • council
      • staff
      • team
      • enemy
      • collection
      • herd
      • committee
      management class family army government leadership BBC Daily Mail The UN Network Rail McDonald’s
    • Single or plural?
      • The company’s management have refused to comment.
      • The company’s management has refused to comment.
    • Single or plural?
      • The number of policies illegally claimed on
      • never been revealed.
      • A number of policies been claimed on illegally.
      has have
    • Single or plural?
      • The FSA reports that awareness levels are rising.
      • The FSA report that awareness levels are rising.
    • Single or plural?
      • We asked the FSA and told us that awareness levels were rising.
      they
    • Single or plural?
      • The committee a week to announce its findings.
      • The committee a week to announce their findings.
      • The committee has a week to announce their findings.
      has have
    • Singular or plural: First Great Western
      • “ The use of mobile phones in this carriage are not allowed.”
    • Round 4
      • Me,
      • Myself,
      • I
      • - and other pronouns
    • Spot the pronouns
      • Who is that over there?
      • Who is that over there?
      • They were the only people in the room.
      • They were the only people in the room.
      • What do you know about her?
      • What do you know about her ?
      • I would let them take it if they ask for it.
      • I would let them take it if they ask for it .
    • I and me
      • Me and Tony and going to a party tonight.
      • Tony and I are going to a party tonight.
    • I and me He asked Tony and to come to the party. me
    • I and me
      • “ It’s goodnight from Christine and .”
      me
    • Reflexive pronouns
      • myself
      • yourself
      • herself
      • himself
      • itself
      • ourselves
      • yourselves
      • themselves
    • Reflexive pronouns
      • I hurt myself with the sharp knife.
      • He taught himself to type.
      • I can do it myself.
      • She selected the policy herself.
      Use when the subject acts on itself… … or for emphasis…
    • Reflexive pronouns
      • The boss invited my wife and myself to dinner.
      • The boss invited my wife and me to dinner.
    • Reflexive pronouns
      • “ We can certainly have the car ready for yourself to pick up by the end of the day, sir.”
    • ‘ which’ and ‘that’: what’s the difference?
      • The house that is painted pink has just been sold.
      • The house, which is painted pink, has just been sold.
    • He or she?
      • If a customer asks for a refund, you should offer
      • only the exact price paid.
      • If customers ask for a refund, you should offer them only the price they paid.
      them they
    • ‘ they’ for ‘he or she’
      • “ There’s a caller with a musical question on
      • Line 1. They realise they may have to wait.’’
      • A: There’s someone at the door!
      • B: Can you go and find out what they want?
    • ‘ they’ for ‘he or she’
      • She kept her head and kicked her shoes off, as everybody ought to do who falls into deep water in their clothes.
      • [C S Lewis, Voyage of the “Dawn Treader”, Chapter I]
    • ‘ they’ for ‘he or she’
      • And how easy the way a man or woman would come in here, glance around, find smiles and pleasant looks waiting for them, then wave and sit down by themselves.
      • [Doris Lessing]
    • ‘ they’ for ‘he or she’
      • God send every one their heart's desire!
      • [Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing , Act III Scene 4]
    • Round 5
      • What’s doing?
      • - the world of verbs
    • Spot the verbs
      • We cooked a Chinese meal last night.
      • We cooked a Chinese meal last night.
      • Will you come to the office at two o’clock?
      • Will you come to the office at two o’clock?
    • Spot the verb
      • Why did you decide on that policy?
      • Why did you decide on that policy?
      • I’m tearing my hair out!
      • I [ am ] tearing my hair out!
    • Voice: active and passive
      • The favourite won the race.
      • The favourite won the race.
      • The race was won by the favourite.
    • Active or passive?
      • Lillian wrote the report.
      • Lillian wrote the report.
      • The report was written by Lillian.
    • Active or passive?
      • We shall hold interviews with twenty customers.
      • We shall hold interviews with twenty customers.
      • Interviews will be held [by us] with twenty customers.
      • Opportunities to sell new products are being missed by sales staff.
      • Opportunities to sell new products are being missed by sales staff.
      • Sales staff are missing opportunities to sell new products.
    • ‘ will’ and ‘shall’
      • I complete the report tomorrow.
      • She join us later.
      shall will
    • ‘ will’ and ‘shall’
      • “ You go the ball.”
      shall
    • ‘ will’ and ‘shall’
      • I live my own life! I !
      will will
    • ‘ will’ and ‘shall’
      • “ I will be drowned; no-one shall save me!”
    • ‘ may’ and ‘might’
    • ‘ may’ and ‘might’
      • That snake might attack someone.
      • It may be under the floorboards.
      • It might eat the cat.
    • ‘ may have’ and ‘might have’
      • Do you have any idea where it may have gone?
      • It might have fallen asleep somewhere.
    • ‘ may have’ and ‘might have’
      • He told me he may have left the lid off the tank.
      • He told me might have left the lid off the tank.
    • ‘ may’ and ‘might’ Neighbours dreads finding missing snake Feb 16 2008 by Dan Warburton, The Journal A police spokesman said: “While the snake is a family pet and has been brought up around children, the owner is concerned that she might look intimidating.”
    • ‘ may have’ and ‘might have’
    • ‘ may have’ and ‘might have’
      • If the RSPCA hadn’t helped us, we may never have found Monty.
      • If the RSPCA hadn’t helped us, we might not have found Monty.
    • dangling participles
      • Coming round the corner, a church came into view.
      • As we came round the corner, a church came into view.
    • dangling participles
      • As a valued customer, we are sending a new prospectus for your perusal.
      • As you are a valued customer, we are sending you a new prospectus for your perusal.
    • dangling participles
      • The exhibition features work by photographers executed between 1940 and 1965.
    • The split infinitive
      • To boldly go….
    • The origins of the controversy
      • “ But surely, this is a practice entirely unknown to English speakers and writers. It seems to me that we ever regard the to of the infinitive as inseparable from its verb. ”
      • [Henry Alford, Plea for the Queen’s English , 1864]
    • H W Fowler on the split infinitive
      • “… literary pretensions can make us deaf to the normal rhythm of English sentences."
    • Raymond Chandler on the split infinitive
      • “ I write in a sort of broken-down patois which is something like the way a Swiss-waiter talks, and that when I split an infinitive, God damn it, I split it so it will remain split.”
    • The split infinitive
      • “ We have to not just deal with this outbreak now but prepare perhaps for a second phase further down the line.”
    • Round 6
      • Describe and qualify
      • - adjectives and adverbs
    • Adjective or adverb?
      • He’s a bright boy who talks quickly.
      • He’s a bright boy who talks quickly .
    • Adjective or adverb?
      • It’s the large white house there.
      • It’s the large white house there .
    • Adjective or adverb?
      • Of the smaller companies in the group, this company is the only one that operates profitably.
      • Of the smaller companies in the group, this company is the only one that operates profitably .
    • The shifting adverb
      • Alan only trains managers.
      • Only Alan trains managers.
      • Alan trains only managers.
    • Round 7
      • Grammatical glue
      • - articles, conjucntions and prepositions
    • The three articles
      • a
      • an
      • the
    • Co-ordinating conjunctions
      • and
      • but
      • for
      • nor
      • or
      • yet
      • so
    • Sub-ordinating conjunctions
      • after
      • although
      • as
      • as if
      • as long as
      • as soon as
      because before how if since so that unless until while whilst whether whereas
    • Sub-ordinating conjunctions
      • I went to work with an umbrella because it was raining.
      • Because it was raining, I went to work with an umbrella.
    • Starting with ‘but’
      • It was a good scheme; but on driving to the door they heard that neither master nor mistress was at home.
      • But when satisfied on all these points, he contrived to find an opportunity of introducing his mother-in-law.
      • [Jane Austen]
    • Starting with ‘and’
      • And is it true? And is it true, This most tremendous tale of all…
      • [John Betjeman]
    • Starting with ‘and’
      • And so to bed.
      • [Samuel Pepys]
    • Starting with ‘and’ and ‘but’
      • But if the result was indecisive, then the soccer was anything but. And when all the medals have been engraved…
    • ‘ however’ as a ‘conjunction’
      • The tap water is quite safe to drink, however, we recommend using bottled water for drinking.
      • The tap water is quite safe to drink. However, we recommend using bottled water for drinking.
      • The tap water is quite safe to drink; however, we recommend using bottled water for drinking.
    • Prepositions
      • above
      • between
      • over
      • into
      • near
      • beside
      • along
      after at before during since until past as for in to but by with without instead of other than in front of up to due to owing to
    • Verbose conjunctions
      • subsequent to
      • in the course of
      • prior to
      • in the event of
      • for the reason that
      • in the neighbourhood of
      • with a view to
      after during before if because about to
    • Preposition at the end of a sentence
      • Who are you talking about?
      • [About whom are you talking?]
      • That’s the restaurant we ate in.
      • […in which we ate.]
      • If you get married, make sure it’s someone you can hold a discussion with.
      • [… with whom you can hold a discussion.]
    • Prepositional verbs
      • Who are you going out with?
      • Even the tea bags were paid for.
      • I don’t know what to believe in.
    • ‘ put’ + prepositions
      • I shall need to put my lipstick on.
      • What sort of voice are you putting on?
      • I shan’t tell you how much weight you’ve put on.
      • What kind of rumours have you been putting about?
      • Do you have any ideas to put forward.
      • I feel really put out.
      • Put upon, actually.
    • ‘ put’ + prepositions
      • I can’t put it off.
      • Can you put me up?
      • What kind of behaviour can you not put up with?
      • Don’t put him down.
      • We had to put the dog down.
      • Is she someone you can put up with?
      • Please put it away.
    • How many prepositions can you end a sentence with…?
      • “ What did you bring me that book to be read to out of up for ?”
    • How many prepositions can you end a sentence with…?
      • "What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read to out of about 'Down Under‘ up for ?"
    • How many prepositions can you end a sentence with…?
      • "What did you say that the sentence with the most prepositions at the end was 'What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read to out of about "Down Under" up for?' for?”
    • Round 8
      • What’s the point?
      • - punctuation marks
    • What’s the point of punctuation?
      • What is this thing called, Love?
      • In short knickers are practical garments.
      • Suzy won’t be here; Her parents disapprove.
    • The power of punctuation
      • A woman without her man is nothing.
      • A woman: without her, man is nothing.
    • The ‘umble comma
      • Please place all towels costumes clothing and valuables in the lockers provided.
      • Please place all towels , costumes , clothing and valuables in the lockers provided.
    • The Oxford comma
      • I went to Lloyds Bank, Marks and Spencer, and HMV.
      • These items are available in black and white, red and yellow, and blue and green.
    • Commas and subordinate clauses
      • Although he was tired, Jeff continued to work.
      • If you cannot open the lid, use a wrench.
    • - and other uses of the comma
      • The good news is that, with your advice, the winners will be you and your clients.
      • However, there is another very important aspect to this.
      • Joyce, the Catering Manager, was annoyed at the quality of the sausages.
    • The colon: lists
      • Marlowe looked at the evidence the rumpled bed the half-smoked cigarettes the bottle of Bourbon open on the bedside table…
    • The colon: lists
      • Marlowe looked at the evidence : the rumpled bed , the half-smoked cigarettes , the bottle of Bourbon open on the bedside table…
    • Lists: colons and semi-colons
      • The benefits include full health insurance a company car and membership of the local gym.
      • The benefits include:
      • full health insurance;
      • a company car; and
      • membership of the local gym.
    • Semi-colons: contrast
      • I enjoy swimming my wife hates it.
      • I enjoy swimming ; my wife hates it.
    • Semi-colons: contrast
      • On average women tend to live until 80 men are only expected to live until 74.
      • On average women tend to live until 80 ; men are only expected to live until 74.
      ,
    • What’s the apostrophe for?
    • Apostrophes to indicate missing letters
      • We’re not getting anywhere.
      • You can’t say that.
      • I wouldn’t say it if I didn’t mean it.
    • The possessive apostrophe
      • The managers office was empty.
      • The manager’s office was empty.
      • The managers’ office was empty.
    • Possessive plurals: careful!
      • She made a mistake and went into the mens room.
      • She made a mistake and went into the men ’ s room.
    • Place the apostrophes
      • Mines a Guinness. Whats yours?
      • Mine ’ s a Guinness. What ’ s yours?
      • Jackie said the jacket was hers.
      • Seasons greetings!
      • Season ’ s greetings!
    • Spot the mistake
    • It’s…
      • Its not obvious.
      • It ’ s not obvious. [ It is ]
      • Its started raining.
      • It ’ s started raining. [ It has ]
    • … and ‘its’
      • A leopard can’t change its spots.
    • Whats missing?
    • Place the apostrophes
      • I wish theyd tell us if theyre planning on one hours delay or two hours delay.
      • I wish they ’ d tell us if they ’ re planning on one hour ’ s delay or two hours ’ delay.
    • Try this one…
      • Its the countries largest supermarket.
      • It ’ s the country ’ s largest supermarket.
    • Names ending in ‘-s’
    • Names ending in ‘-s’
    • The grocers apostrophe’s
    • Wandering apostrophe’s
    • Who’s pizza’s?
    • Serial apostrophe abus’e
    • Right or wrong?
    • Round 9
      • A or B?
    • Kairos Training Limited
      • www.kairostraining.co.uk