Reservoir Engineering 1 Course (1st Ed.)
1. Turbulent Flow
2. Superposition
A. Multiple Well
B. Multi Rate
C. Reservoir Boundary
1. Productivity Index (PI)
2. Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR)
3. Generating IPR
A. Vogel’s Method
B. Vogel’s Method ...
Well Performance
These lectures presents the practical reservoir
engineering equations that are designed to predict
the p...
Production Performance Analysis
The analysis of the production performance is
essentially based on the following fluid an...
Productivity Index
A commonly used measure
of the ability of the well to
produce is the Productivity
Index.
Defined by t...
Productivity Index Measurement
The productivity index is generally measured during
a production test on the well.
The we...
Productivity Index Conditions
It is important to note that the productivity index is
a valid measure of the well producti...
Productivity Index during Flow
Regimes
The figure
indicates that
during the
transient flow
period,
the calculated
values...
Productivity Index Calculation
The productivity index can be numerically
calculated by recognizing that J must be defined...
Application of Productivity Index
Since most of the well life is spent in a flow regime
that is approximating the pseudos...
Specific Productivity Index
A comparison of productivity indices of different
wells in the same reservoir should also ind...
Qo vs. Δp Relationship
Assuming that the well’s
productivity index is
constant:
Where

Δp = drawdown, psi
J = producti...
Inflow Performance Relationship
Alternatively, productivity
Index Equation can be written
as:

 The above expression sho...
Features of the Straight-Line IPR
Several important features of the straight-line IPR
can be seen in Figure:
When pwf eq...
Absolute Open Flow
Although in practice AOF may not be a condition at
which the well can produce,
It is a useful definit...
IPR For Below Pb
(Qo=JΔP) suggests that the
inflow into a well is directly
proportional to the
pressure drawdown and
the ...
Pressure Dependent Variables
Affecting PI
Recalling following
Equation:

Treating the term
between the two
brackets as a...
Schematically Illustration of the
Variables as a Function of P

2013 H. AlamiNia

Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical...
Behavior of Pressure Dependent
Variables
Above the bubble-point pressure pb
The relative oil permeability kro equals uni...
Effect of Reservoir Pressure on IPR
Figure shows
qualitatively
the effect of
reservoir
depletion on
the IPR.

2013 H. Ala...
Empirical Methods
to Predict NL Behavior of IPR
Several empirical methods are designed to predict
the non-linearity behav...
Empirical Methods to Generate IPR
The following empirical methods that are designed
to generate the current and future in...
Vogel’s Method
Vogel (1968) used a computer model to generate
IPRs for several hypothetical saturated-oil reservoirs
that...
Vogel’s IPR
Vogel plotted the dimensionless IPR curves for all the
reservoir cases and arrived at the following relations...
Vogel’s Method for Comingle
Production of Water and Oil
Vogel’s method can be extended to account for
water production by...
Vogel’s Methodology Applications
Vogel’s methodology can be used to predict the IPR
curve for the following two types of ...
Vogel’s Method:
Saturated Oil Reservoirs
When the reservoir pressure equals the bubblepoint pressure, the oil reservoir i...
Vogel’s Method:
Saturated Oil Reservoirs (Cont.)
Step 1. Using the stabilized flow data, i.e., Qo and
pwf, calculate (Qo)...
Vogel’s Method:
Undersaturated Oil Reservoirs
Beggs (1991) pointed out that in applying Vogel’s
method for undersaturated...
Stabilized flow test data

2013 H. AlamiNia

Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance

36
Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil
Reservoirs (Pwf≥Pb)
Beggs outlined the following procedure for
determining the IPR whe...
Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil
Reservoirs (Pwf≥Pb) (Cont.)
Step 2. Calculate the oil flow rate at the bubblepoint pre...
Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil
Reservoirs (Pwf≥Pb) (Cont.)
The maximum oil flow rate (Qo max or AOF) occurs
when the ...
Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil
Reservoirs (Pwf<Pb)
When the recorded pwf from the stabilized flow
test is below the b...
Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil
Reservoirs (Pwf<Pb) (Cont.)
Step 2. Calculate Qob by using:

Step 3. Generate the IPR...
1. Ahmed, T. (2006). Reservoir engineering
handbook (Gulf Professional Publishing). Ch7
1. Future IPR Approximation
2. Generating IPR for Oil Wells
A. Wiggins’ Method
B. Standing’s Method
C. Fetkovich’s Method
...
Q913 re1 w4 lec 13
Q913 re1 w4 lec 13
Q913 re1 w4 lec 13
Q913 re1 w4 lec 13
Q913 re1 w4 lec 13
Q913 re1 w4 lec 13
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Q913 re1 w4 lec 13

  1. 1. Reservoir Engineering 1 Course (1st Ed.)
  2. 2. 1. Turbulent Flow 2. Superposition A. Multiple Well B. Multi Rate C. Reservoir Boundary
  3. 3. 1. Productivity Index (PI) 2. Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) 3. Generating IPR A. Vogel’s Method B. Vogel’s Method (Undersaturated Reservoirs)
  4. 4. Well Performance These lectures presents the practical reservoir engineering equations that are designed to predict the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Also describe some of the factors that are governing the flow of fluids from the formation to the wellbore and how these factors may affect the production performance of the well. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 5
  5. 5. Production Performance Analysis The analysis of the production performance is essentially based on the following fluid and well characteristics: Fluid PVT properties Relative permeability data Inflow-performance-relationship (IPR) 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 6
  6. 6. Productivity Index A commonly used measure of the ability of the well to produce is the Productivity Index. Defined by the symbol J, the productivity index is the ratio of the total liquid flow rate to the pressure drawdown. For a water-free oil production, the productivity index is given by:  2013 H. AlamiNia Where Qo = oil flow rate, STB/day J = productivity index, STB/day/psi p–r = volumetric average drainage area pressure (static pressure) pwf = bottom-hole flowing pressure Δp = drawdown, psi Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 7
  7. 7. Productivity Index Measurement The productivity index is generally measured during a production test on the well. The well is shut-in until the static reservoir pressure is reached. The well is then allowed to produce at a constant flow rate of Q and a stabilized bottom-hole flow pressure of pwf. Since a stabilized pressure at surface does not necessarily indicate a stabilized pwf, the bottom-hole flowing pressure should be recorded continuously from the time the well is to flow. The productivity index is then calculated from: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 8
  8. 8. Productivity Index Conditions It is important to note that the productivity index is a valid measure of the well productivity potential only if the well is flowing at pseudosteady-state conditions. Therefore, in order to accurately measure the productivity index of a well, it is essential that the well is allowed to flow at a constant flow rate for a sufficient amount of time to reach the pseudosteady-state. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 9
  9. 9. Productivity Index during Flow Regimes The figure indicates that during the transient flow period, the calculated values of the productivity index will vary depending upon the time at which the measurement s of pwf are made. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 10
  10. 10. Productivity Index Calculation The productivity index can be numerically calculated by recognizing that J must be defined in terms of semisteady-state flow conditions. Recalling below Equation: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 11
  11. 11. Application of Productivity Index Since most of the well life is spent in a flow regime that is approximating the pseudosteady-state, the productivity index is a valuable methodology for predicting the future performance of wells. Further, by monitoring the productivity index during the life of a well, it is possible to determine if the well has become damaged due to completion, workover, production, injection operations, or mechanical problems. If a measured J has an unexpected decline, one of the indicated problems should be investigated. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 12
  12. 12. Specific Productivity Index A comparison of productivity indices of different wells in the same reservoir should also indicate some of the wells might have experienced unusual difficulties or damage during completion. Since the productivity indices may vary from well to well because of the variation in thickness of the reservoir, it is helpful to normalize the indices by dividing each by the thickness of the well. This is defined as the specific productivity index Js, or: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 13
  13. 13. Qo vs. Δp Relationship Assuming that the well’s productivity index is constant: Where Δp = drawdown, psi J = productivity index The Equation indicates that the relationship between Qo and Δp is a straight line passing through the origin with a slope of J as shown in Figure. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 15
  14. 14. Inflow Performance Relationship Alternatively, productivity Index Equation can be written as:  The above expression shows that the plot pwf against Qo is a straight line with a slope of (−1/J) as shown schematically in Figure. This graphical representation of the relationship that exists between the oil flow rate and bottom-hole flowing pressure is called the inflow performance relationship and referred to as IPR. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 16
  15. 15. Features of the Straight-Line IPR Several important features of the straight-line IPR can be seen in Figure: When pwf equals average reservoir pressure, the flow rate is zero due to the absence of any pressure drawdown. Maximum rate of flow occurs when pwf is zero. This maximum rate is called absolute open flow and referred to as AOF. The slope of the straight line equals the reciprocal of the productivity index. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 17
  16. 16. Absolute Open Flow Although in practice AOF may not be a condition at which the well can produce, It is a useful definition that has widespread applications in the petroleum industry (e.g., comparing flow potential of different wells in the field). The AOF is then calculated by: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 18
  17. 17. IPR For Below Pb (Qo=JΔP) suggests that the inflow into a well is directly proportional to the pressure drawdown and the constant of proportionality is the productivity index. Muskat and Evinger (1942) and Vogel (1968) observed that when the pressure drops below the bubblepoint pressure, the IPR deviates from that of the simple straight-line relationship as shown in Figure. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 19
  18. 18. Pressure Dependent Variables Affecting PI Recalling following Equation: Treating the term between the two brackets as a constant c, the above equation can be written in the following form:  2013 H. AlamiNia Above equation reveals that the variables affecting the productivity index are essentially those that are pressure dependent, i.e.: Oil viscosity μo Oil formation volume factor Bo Relative permeability to oil kro Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 20
  19. 19. Schematically Illustration of the Variables as a Function of P 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 21
  20. 20. Behavior of Pressure Dependent Variables Above the bubble-point pressure pb The relative oil permeability kro equals unity (kro = 1) and the term (kro/μoBo) is almost constant. As the pressure declines below pb: The gas is released from solution, which can cause a large decrease in both kro and (kro/μoBo). 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 22
  21. 21. Effect of Reservoir Pressure on IPR Figure shows qualitatively the effect of reservoir depletion on the IPR. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 23
  22. 22. Empirical Methods to Predict NL Behavior of IPR Several empirical methods are designed to predict the non-linearity behavior of the IPR for solution gas drive reservoirs. Most of these methods require at least one stabilized flow test in which Qo and pwf are measured. All the methods include the following two computational steps: Using the stabilized flow test data, construct the IPR curve at the current average reservoir pressure p–r. Predict future inflow performance relationships as to the function of average reservoir pressures. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 24
  23. 23. Empirical Methods to Generate IPR The following empirical methods that are designed to generate the current and future inflow performance relationships: Vogel’s Method Wiggins’ Method Standing’s Method Fetkovich’s Method The Klins-Clark Method 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 25
  24. 24. Vogel’s Method Vogel (1968) used a computer model to generate IPRs for several hypothetical saturated-oil reservoirs that are producing under a wide range of conditions. Vogel normalized the calculated IPRs and expressed the relationships in a dimensionless form. He normalized the IPRs by introducing the following dimensionless parameters: Where (Qo) max is the flow rate at zero wellbore pressure, i.e., AOF. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 28
  25. 25. Vogel’s IPR Vogel plotted the dimensionless IPR curves for all the reservoir cases and arrived at the following relationship between the above dimensionless parameters: Where Qo = oil rate at pwf (Qo) max = maximum oil flow rate at zero wellbore pressure, i.e., AOF p–r = current average reservoir pressure, psig pwf = wellbore pressure, psig Notice that pwf and p–r must be expressed in psig. 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 29
  26. 26. Vogel’s Method for Comingle Production of Water and Oil Vogel’s method can be extended to account for water production by replacing the dimensionless rate with QL/(QL) max where QL = Qo + Qw. This has proved to be valid for wells producing at water cuts as high as 97%. The method requires the following data: Current average reservoir pressure p–r Bubble-point pressure pb Stabilized flow test data that include Qo at pwf 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 30
  27. 27. Vogel’s Methodology Applications Vogel’s methodology can be used to predict the IPR curve for the following two types of reservoirs: Saturated oil reservoirs p–r ≤ pb Undersaturated oil reservoirs p–r > pb 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 31
  28. 28. Vogel’s Method: Saturated Oil Reservoirs When the reservoir pressure equals the bubblepoint pressure, the oil reservoir is referred to as a saturated-oil reservoir. The computational procedure of applying Vogel’s method in a saturated oil reservoir to generate the IPR curve for a well with a stabilized flow data point, i.e., a recorded Qo value at pwf, is summarized below: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 32
  29. 29. Vogel’s Method: Saturated Oil Reservoirs (Cont.) Step 1. Using the stabilized flow data, i.e., Qo and pwf, calculate (Qo)max from: Step 2. Construct the IPR curve by assuming various values for pwf and calculating the corresponding Qo from: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 33
  30. 30. Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil Reservoirs Beggs (1991) pointed out that in applying Vogel’s method for undersaturated reservoirs, there are two possible outcomes to the recorded stabilized flow test data that must be considered, as shown schematically in next slide: The recorded stabilized Pwf is greater than or equal to the bubble-point pressure, i.e. pwf ≥ pb The recorded stabilized pwf is less than the bubble-point pressure pwf < pb 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 35
  31. 31. Stabilized flow test data 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 36
  32. 32. Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil Reservoirs (Pwf≥Pb) Beggs outlined the following procedure for determining the IPR when the stabilized bottomhole pressure is greater than or equal to the bubble point pressure: Step 1. Using the stabilized test data point (Qo and pwf) calculate the productivity index J: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 37
  33. 33. Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil Reservoirs (Pwf≥Pb) (Cont.) Step 2. Calculate the oil flow rate at the bubblepoint pressure: Where Qob is the oil flow rate at pb Step 3. Generate the IPR values below the bubblepoint pressure by assuming different values of pwf < pb and calculating the corresponding oil flow rates by applying the following relationship: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 38
  34. 34. Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil Reservoirs (Pwf≥Pb) (Cont.) The maximum oil flow rate (Qo max or AOF) occurs when the bottom hole flowing pressure is zero, i.e. pwf = 0, which can be determined from the above expression as: It should be pointed out that when pwf ≥ pb, the IPR is linear and is described by: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 39
  35. 35. Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil Reservoirs (Pwf<Pb) When the recorded pwf from the stabilized flow test is below the bubble point pressure, the following procedure for generating the IPR data is proposed: Step 1. Using the stabilized well flow test data and combining above equations, solve for the productivity index J to give: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 40
  36. 36. Vogel’s Method: Undersaturated Oil Reservoirs (Pwf<Pb) (Cont.) Step 2. Calculate Qob by using: Step 3. Generate the IPR for pwf ≥ pb by assuming several values for pwf above the bubble point pressure and calculating the corresponding Qo from: Step 4. Use below Equation to calculate Qo at various values of pwf below pb, or: 2013 H. AlamiNia Reservoir Engineering 1 Course: Vertical Oil Well Performance 41
  37. 37. 1. Ahmed, T. (2006). Reservoir engineering handbook (Gulf Professional Publishing). Ch7
  38. 38. 1. Future IPR Approximation 2. Generating IPR for Oil Wells A. Wiggins’ Method B. Standing’s Method C. Fetkovich’s Method 3. Horizontal Oil Well Performance 4. Horizontal Well Productivity
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