State Dept Web 2.0 Presentation 10.21.08

554 views
524 views

Published on

A presentation I delivered for the State Department back in October 2008 - a customized version of a workshop that I deliver with examples across government.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
554
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
27
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Learning For the Google GenerationJeanne C. Meister, April 2008This generation appears to be a discrete segment, and companies are grappling with how to best attract, develop and retain them as they prepare for their looming entry into the workforce. As companies debate this, one of the first issues they will deal with is setting a policy regarding allowing access to social networking sites at work. There is some evidence suggesting the Google generation will demand access to social networking sites in the office. In fact, Professor Clive Holtham of Cass Business School notes that in California, some firms already are finding they cannot attract or retain staff because their IT infrastructure fails to meet the standards of younger workers.So while the learning department examines how to incorporate social networking into the delivery mix, they should take note of some of the benefits other departments in the organization have experienced in embracing these new technologies.Deloitte has come up with the innovative idea of hosting an employee film festival where employees submit creative videos, titled “What’s Your Deloitte?”, as a way of encouraging new hires to make short films that express their vision of the firm’s culture and values. Then, the best of these short films are posted to YouTube.Deloitte has engaged in social media in a variety of other ways, with a special focus on using social networking in new-hire on-boarding and orientation. In fact, Deloitte, along with KPMG, is using Facebook to create new networks for recent hires. Some are in public view while others are hidden for privacy purposes. But both are experimenting with social media so new hires can network with peers around the globe. 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • Learning For the Google GenerationJeanne C. Meister, April 2008This generation appears to be a discrete segment, and companies are grappling with how to best attract, develop and retain them as they prepare for their looming entry into the workforce. As companies debate this, one of the first issues they will deal with is setting a policy regarding allowing access to social networking sites at work. There is some evidence suggesting the Google generation will demand access to social networking sites in the office. In fact, Professor Clive Holtham of Cass Business School notes that in California, some firms already are finding they cannot attract or retain staff because their IT infrastructure fails to meet the standards of younger workers.So while the learning department examines how to incorporate social networking into the delivery mix, they should take note of some of the benefits other departments in the organization have experienced in embracing these new technologies.Deloitte has come up with the innovative idea of hosting an employee film festival where employees submit creative videos, titled “What’s Your Deloitte?”, as a way of encouraging new hires to make short films that express their vision of the firm’s culture and values. Then, the best of these short films are posted to YouTube.Deloitte has engaged in social media in a variety of other ways, with a special focus on using social networking in new-hire on-boarding and orientation. In fact, Deloitte, along with KPMG, is using Facebook to create new networks for recent hires. Some are in public view while others are hidden for privacy purposes. But both are experimenting with social media so new hires can network with peers around the globe. 5
  • Learning For the Google GenerationJeanne C. Meister, April 2008This generation appears to be a discrete segment, and companies are grappling with how to best attract, develop and retain them as they prepare for their looming entry into the workforce. As companies debate this, one of the first issues they will deal with is setting a policy regarding allowing access to social networking sites at work. There is some evidence suggesting the Google generation will demand access to social networking sites in the office. In fact, Professor Clive Holtham of Cass Business School notes that in California, some firms already are finding they cannot attract or retain staff because their IT infrastructure fails to meet the standards of younger workers.So while the learning department examines how to incorporate social networking into the delivery mix, they should take note of some of the benefits other departments in the organization have experienced in embracing these new technologies.Deloitte has come up with the innovative idea of hosting an employee film festival where employees submit creative videos, titled “What’s Your Deloitte?”, as a way of encouraging new hires to make short films that express their vision of the firm’s culture and values. Then, the best of these short films are posted to YouTube.Deloitte has engaged in social media in a variety of other ways, with a special focus on using social networking in new-hire on-boarding and orientation. In fact, Deloitte, along with KPMG, is using Facebook to create new networks for recent hires. Some are in public view while others are hidden for privacy purposes. But both are experimenting with social media so new hires can network with peers around the globe. 5
  • 5
  • Learning For the Google GenerationJeanne C. Meister, April 2008This generation appears to be a discrete segment, and companies are grappling with how to best attract, develop and retain them as they prepare for their looming entry into the workforce. As companies debate this, one of the first issues they will deal with is setting a policy regarding allowing access to social networking sites at work. There is some evidence suggesting the Google generation will demand access to social networking sites in the office. In fact, Professor Clive Holtham of Cass Business School notes that in California, some firms already are finding they cannot attract or retain staff because their IT infrastructure fails to meet the standards of younger workers.So while the learning department examines how to incorporate social networking into the delivery mix, they should take note of some of the benefits other departments in the organization have experienced in embracing these new technologies.Deloitte has come up with the innovative idea of hosting an employee film festival where employees submit creative videos, titled “What’s Your Deloitte?”, as a way of encouraging new hires to make short films that express their vision of the firm’s culture and values. Then, the best of these short films are posted to YouTube.Deloitte has engaged in social media in a variety of other ways, with a special focus on using social networking in new-hire on-boarding and orientation. In fact, Deloitte, along with KPMG, is using Facebook to create new networks for recent hires. Some are in public view while others are hidden for privacy purposes. But both are experimenting with social media so new hires can network with peers around the globe. 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • Swarming InformationBy Justin Rood jrood@govexec.com January 11, 2006Government Executive: Management Mattershttp://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?filepath=/dailyfed/0106/011106mm.htm Less than two hours after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast 0n Aug. 29, for example, volunteers had set up a \"wiki\" -- an open, collaborative online tool -- to be a central repository for information to help survivors find aid and volunteers to provide it.As officials struggled to straighten out their bureaucratic hierarchies, the Hurricane Katrina Help Wiki (www.katrinahelp.info) quickly became a more comprehensive source of information than any government outlet, helping tens of thousands of people use dozens of largely uncoordinated public and private efforts to save themselves and their pets, find food and shelter, and locate loved ones. Thousands contributed information updated postings and made corrections.Intellipedia5
  • State Dept Web 2.0 Presentation 10.21.08

    1. 1. AVATARS AND BLOGS AND WIKIS, OH MY!* HOW WEB 2.0 IS REACHING YOUTH For: U.S. Department of State October 21, 2008  Presented by: y Andrew Krzmarzick *There’s nothing to fear (but fear itself)…so be courageous!
    2. 2. AGENDA Four Generations Cell Phones Learning Preferences Webcasts/Webinars What s Web 2.0? What’s Web 2 0? YouTube/Videos Social Virtual Networking Second Life Blogs Gaming Podcasts Wikis
    3. 3. FOUR GENERATIONS Veterans ‐Born between 1901‐1945 (Youngest = 62 years old) Born between 1901 1945 (Youngest = 62 years old) Baby Boomers ‐ Born between 1945 and 1964 (ages 43–62) Born between 1945 and 1964 (ages 43 62) Gen X ‐ Born between 1965 and 1981 (ages 26–42)  (g ) Millennials ‐ Born between 1982 and 2003 (ages 4‐25)  Source: Washburn, E. Are You Ready for Generation X? Changing World View – The Five Generations, Physician Executive. January‐February 2000.
    4. 4. LEARNING PREFERENCES* PREFERENCES Veterans Boomers Gen X Millennials Formal/conservative Lifelong learners Edutainment Teamwork Value to team vs. self Well-educated Clear expectations Technology Straightforward Interactive/participatory Be efficient Experiential Learn privately Non-authoritarian Use visual aids Learning communities Big picture, then detail Networking, teamwork Up-to-date technology Clear structure Respect for experience Make ’em feel important Break frequently Fun and games Tie to real-world Real-time application Tie to reality Relevant Clear and logical facts Cl dl i lf t Be d B democratic ti Role l R l plays are good d Short tt ti Sh t attention span * Source: Coates, J. Generational Learning Styles. LERN Books. River Falls, WI
    5. 5. THE NEW LEARNER Self‐Initiated Interactive Continuous C ti Blended Approach Bl d d A h Just‐in‐Time Information Sharing g Just Enough Collaborative
    6. 6. THE NEW LEARNER What technology/tools are you currently using to reach Millennials? What would you like to use?
    7. 7. WHAT S WHAT’S WEB 2.0 Imagine an Internet… Imagine an Internet
    8. 8. WHAT S WHAT’S WEB 2.0 Collaboration + Interaction = Web 2.0 
    9. 9. SOCIAL VIRTUAL NETWORKING Who in this room has the most  connections/friends/fans?
    10. 10. SOCIAL VIRTUAL NETWORKING
    11. 11. SOCIAL VIRTUAL NETWORKING
    12. 12. SOCIAL VIRTUAL NETWORKING Step 1:  Pick a Place to Connect Step 2:  Create an Account Step 3:  Confirm Your Email Step 4:  Set Up Your Web Page St     S t U  Y  W b P Step 5:  Edit and Save!
    13. 13. IMPLEMENTATION 1. Why? Tie to mission, goals, objectives, needs, gaps. 1  Why? Tie to mission  goals  objectives  needs  gaps 2. How? Decide which tools best meet goals. 3. What? Content is the key to success. 4. Who? Assign owner/contributors; define audience Assign owner/contributors; define audience. 5. When? Create a schedule to implement and evaluate. 
    14. 14. BLOGS What is a Blog? a. an online journal or diary j y b. a  time waster c. abbreviation for “web log” d. a creature from a bad sci‐fi movie
    15. 15. BLOGS
    16. 16. PODCASTS Q. What s the difference between  Q  What’s the difference between  a podcast and a vodcast? A. Podcast = Audio Downloadable Vodcast = Video   Video 
    17. 17. PODCASTS
    18. 18. PODCASTS Step 1:  Pick a Platform Step 2:  Create an Account Step 3:  Create Your Call Step 4:  Start/Record Call Step 5:  Edit and Post!
    19. 19. CELL PHONES What has your Cell Phone taught  you lately? “Most cell phones today have  more computing power  than was available to  NASA during the  • Audio Books Apollo space program…” • Podcast Briefs (i.e. Guide by Cell) ( y ) h f ‐ Wes Ferguson, Author of  • Text Message Tips Moving at the Speed of Creativity • Entire Classes????
    20. 20. CELL PHONES According to figures from Eurostat:* • Tops in Europe is Luxembourg with 158 mobile subscriptions per 100 people, closely followed by Lithuania and Italy. • In Hong Kong the penetration rate reached 139.8% 139 8% of the population in July 2007 2007. • Over 50 countries have mobile phone subscription penetration rates higher than that of the population and the Western European pp p average penetration rate was 110% in 2007. • U.S. currently has one of the lowest rates of mobile phone penetrations in the industrialised world at 85%. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone
    21. 21. WEBCASTS & WEBINARS Q. What’s the difference between  Q  Wh t’  th  diff  b t   a webcast and a webinar? A.  Webcast = One‐Way Webinar = Interaction
    22. 22. WEBCASTS & WEBINARS
    23. 23. EBOOKS
    24. 24. YOUTUBE Why/How do you use Wh /H  d     ?
    25. 25. YOUTUBE
    26. 26. SECOND LIFE What s the coolest name for an  What’s the coolest name for an  avatar in Second Life? a. I h b d I Ichabod Issachar h b. Siegfried Lactanoid c. Zedeka Nadezda d. Horatio Fizelmeister Second Life Avatar
    27. 27. SECOND LIFE Transforming Government October 9, 2008 •State Department, Bureau of International Information Programs with Cambridge Education, and the University of Southern California’s Center on Public Diplomacy. •14 countries: Iran, the UK, Hungary, Latvia, Turkey, Finland, Bulgaria, Spain, Scotland, the Netherlands, Wales, Denmark, Canada and the United States.
    28. 28. Reinventing Public Diplomacy VIDEO GAMES Through Games Competition • 2005-2006: USC Center on Public Diplomacy hosted a video game-making contest. • The challenge: design a prototype or modify a game incorporating the fundamental characteristics of public diplomacy. • May 2006: announced the contest winners during the awards ceremony, which was held at the Davidson Center at the University of S th t th U i it f Southern C lif i California. • The event was simulcast in Second Screenshot of the awards ceremony in Second Life Life, where the attendance on Annenberg Island exceeded that at USC's Davidson Center. http://uscpublicdiplomacy.org/index.php/virtualworlds/contest // / / /
    29. 29. WIKIS Wh t i  th   ld i    Wiki? What in the world is a Wiki? a. an online encyclopedia b. a web‐based tool where multiple users  create, publish and edit information t   bli h  d  dit i f ti c. a Hawaiian word for “fast”  d. all of the above
    30. 30. WIKIS
    31. 31. WIKIS Step 1:  Pick a Wiki Platform St     Pi k   Wiki Pl tf Step 2:  Create an Account Step 3:  Set Up Your Wiki Step 4:  Produce Content St  5   Edit  d P t! Step 5:  Edit and Post!
    32. 32. WEB 2.0: NEXT STEPS 1. 1 Why? Tie to mission, goals, objectives, needs, gaps. Why? Tie to mission  goals  objectives  needs  gaps 2. Who? Assign owner/contributors; define audience.  3. How? Decide which tools best meet goals. 4. What? Content is the key to success. 5. When? Create a schedule to implement and evaluate. 
    33. 33. BRAINSTORMING Social Virtual Networking eBooks Blogs YouTube Podcasts Second Life Cell Phones Wikis • Webcasts/Webinars  What will you do to reach youth  using Web 2.0 tools?
    34. 34. THANK YOU! FOR MORE INFORMATION: ANDREW KRZMARZICK (202) 821‐6288 ANDREW_KRZMARZICK@GRAD.USDA.GOV HTTP://GENERATIONSHIFT BLOGSPOT COM HTTP://GENERATIONSHIFT.BLOGSPOT.COM

    ×