Roundtree -  SXSW 2011 - Minority Report
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Roundtree -  SXSW 2011 - Minority Report Roundtree - SXSW 2011 - Minority Report Presentation Transcript

  • Minority Report: Social Media for Decreasing Healthcare DisparitiesDecreasing Healthcare Disparities SXSW 2011 Aimee Kendall Roundtree, PhD Aimee Kendall Roundtree, PhD University of Houston‐Downtown @akroundtree
  • Why this topic? y p
  • Minorities use social media a lot. (Source: Florida State University Center for Hispanic Marketing Communication)
  • Healthcare Disparities Persist.• Minorities are more likely to be diagnosed with late‐stage breast cancer and  colorectal cancer compared with whites.• When hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction, Hispanics are less likely to  receive optimal care.• Many racial and ethnic minorities and persons of lower socioeconomic  position are more likely to die from HIV. Minorities also account for a  disproportionate share of new AIDS cases. disproportionate share of new AIDS cases• The use of physical restraints in nursing homes is higher among Hispanics and  Asian/Pacific Islanders compared with non‐Hispanic whites.• Blacks and poorer patients have higher rates of avoidable hospital admissions  Blacks and poorer patients have higher rates of avoidable hospital admissions (i.e., hospitalizations for health conditions that, in the presence of  comprehensive primary care, rarely require hospitalization). (Source: National Healthcare Disparities Report  2007) ( l lh )
  • Healthcare Disparities Matter to  Healthcare Disparities Matter to Individuals and Society. “[T]o the extent that minority beneficiaries of publicly funded health programs are less likely to receive high quality care, these beneficiaries as well as the taxpayers that support these beneficiaries—as well as the taxpayers that supportpublic health care programs—may face higher future health care costs." (Unequal Treatment, 1999)“The personal cost of disparities can lead to significant morbidity, disability, and lost productivity at the individual  o b d ty, d sab ty, a d ost p oduct ty at t e d dualevel. At the societal level, distal costs follow from proximal opportunities that were missed to intervene and reduce burden of illness. (National Healthcare Disparities Reportburden of illness ”  (National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2010)
  • Community Matters in Health Behavior.Community Matters in Health Behavior. (Source: Social Cognitive Theory, Bandura, 1989)
  • Community Matters in Minority Health. Community‐based participatory research has  p numerous examples of communities working  g to improve quality overall, while reducing  p healthcare disparities for vulnerable  populations. (Source: National Healthcare Disparities Report, 2003)
  • Research in Progress• Content analysis of 100 minority‐owned Twitter  accounts• Survey of Facebook users regarding how they use  the network for health decision‐making and  community• Content analysis of how 75 minority health  advocacy groups use Facebook d b k
  • Preliminary FindingsP li i Fi di
  • What health info do we share on Twitter? The basics.
  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Body ImageBody Image
  • General HealthGeneral Health
  • Does Facebook have potential for patient  activation (i.e., encouraging more patient involvement in healthcare decision making)? Maybe.
  • People aren’t currently using Facebook for People aren’t c rrentl sing Facebook for health decision‐making. 
  • But Facebook users feel close to their virtual  community members.
  • And Facebook users are generally active in And Facebook users are generally active in health decision‐making.
  • African Americans might be slightly more likely than others to use health info from Facebook.
  • How do minority health groups use Facebook?  Mostly like old media.
  • They share studies and findings.
  • They post flyers, info about campaignsThey post flyers, info about campaigns
  • They promote events.They promote events.
  • They report news and government action.They report news and government action.
  • They link to other social media.They link to other social media.
  • Only a few use it for activism.Only a few use it for activism.
  • They have modest success engaging followers. They have modest success engaging followers. Average High LowMembers 462 7,377 27Posts/month 7 80 1Comments/month 12 283 0Likes 27 614 0
  • Minorities use social media, and social media Mi iti i l di d i l dimay replicate real‐world social bonds and , by  extension, social influence.  i i l i fl Social influence can impact health behavior. But, on whole, minority health advocacy groups haven’t yet capitalized on the media for  building communities. 
  • Recommendations• Write like a friend, not an agency. , g y• Target patient navigators, rather than patients.• Share narratives, anecdotes and profiles more  than facts and figures.• Allow your followers to share content as much as  you do.  you do• Listen as much as you talk. Respond as much as  y you initiate. • Start from their level of engagement, then  scaffold to new behavior. 
  • Contact Info Contact InfoEmail:   roundtreea@uhd.edu Twitter:  @akroundtree Twitter: @akroundtree