Progress Reports and the Public                         ENG 3302Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports   © 2012 byBedfo...
Table of ContentsTopic                                            SlidesProgress Reports                                 3...
Progress ReportsChapter 17. Writing Informational Reports   © 2012 byBedford/St. Martins
Informational reports can take many forms: • e-mails • memos • forms • reports • Web pages     Chapter 17. Writing Informa...
The writing process for informational      reports includes six steps:• Analyze your audience.• Analyze your purpose.• Res...
Consider three questions whenwriting reports for multicultural readers:• How might your readers react to your  information...
You likely will have to write   five types of informational reports:• directives• field reports• progress and status repor...
Use this strategy when writing directives:• Explain why the new policy is desirable or at  least necessary.• Present clear...
Use this strategy when writing field reports: • Describe inspections, maintenance, and site   studies. • Explain the probl...
Answer these six questions in a field report:  • What is the purpose of the report?  • What are the main points covered in...
Understand the difference between    a progress report and a status report:• A progress report describes an ongoing projec...
Report your progress honestly whenresponding to three common problems:• The deliverable won’t be what you thought it  woul...
Two organizational patterns are    typical in progress and status reports:Time Pattern                       Task PatternD...
Project an appropriate tone       in a progress or status report:• If the news is good, convey your optimism but  avoid ov...
Use this strategy       when writing incident reports:• Explain what happened.• Explain why it happened.• Explain what the...
Use this strategy     when writing meeting minutes:• Be clear, comprehensive, objective, and  diplomatic.• Report the even...
Communicating with the PublicChapter 17. Writing Informational Reports   © 2012 byBedford/St. Martins
Tools and policies for     communication have changed:• The old philosophy was top down. For  example, a company wanting t...
Here are four one-way applications for presenting information to the public:• newsletters• brochures• white papers• podcas...
A typical newsletter includes         most of these 10 elements:•   banner•   table of contents•   headlines•   bylines•  ...
A typical newsletter includes     most of these 10 elements (cont.):•   continuation headings•   photographs•   pull quote...
Follow these four suggestions       when creating a brochure:• Decide where and how your brochure will be  reproduced.• De...
Follow these seven suggestions    for writing an effective white paper:• Communicate useful information.• Use a subtle app...
Practice these six ethical values     when marketing your organization:•   honesty•   responsibility•   fairness•   respec...
Follow these four steps             when creating a podcast:•   Prepare for your podcast.•   Record the podcast.•   Edit t...
Three social-media applications     for connecting with the public:• discussion boards• blogs• wikis     Chapter 22. Conne...
Follow these six guidelines    when posting to discussion boards:•   Share your knowledge.•   Do your homework before post...
Follow these six guidelines             when writing a blog:• Know and follow your company’s blogging  policies.• Provide ...
Follow these six suggestions              when using a wiki:•   Know your audience.•   Keep your wiki up-to-date.•   Integ...
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  1. 1. Progress Reports and the Public ENG 3302Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 byBedford/St. Martins
  2. 2. Table of ContentsTopic SlidesProgress Reports 3-16Public Connections 17-29 Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins
  3. 3. Progress ReportsChapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 byBedford/St. Martins
  4. 4. Informational reports can take many forms: • e-mails • memos • forms • reports • Web pages Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 4
  5. 5. The writing process for informational reports includes six steps:• Analyze your audience.• Analyze your purpose.• Research the subject and compile your information.• Choose an appropriate format.• Draft the report.• Revise, edit, and proofread the report. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 5
  6. 6. Consider three questions whenwriting reports for multicultural readers:• How might your readers react to your informational report?• Will your readers be comfortable with your choice of application?• Do you need to adjust your writing style? Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 6
  7. 7. You likely will have to write five types of informational reports:• directives• field reports• progress and status reports• incident reports• meeting minutes Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 7
  8. 8. Use this strategy when writing directives:• Explain why the new policy is desirable or at least necessary.• Present clear, compelling evidence.• Consider opposing arguments effectively.• Present yourself as cooperative, moderate, fair-minded, and modest.• If appropriate, include arguments that appeal to readers’ broader goals of security, recogni- tion, professional growth, and connectedness. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 8
  9. 9. Use this strategy when writing field reports: • Describe inspections, maintenance, and site studies. • Explain the problem, methods, results, and conclusions. • Deemphasize methods. • Include recommendations if needed. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 9
  10. 10. Answer these six questions in a field report: • What is the purpose of the report? • What are the main points covered in the report? • What were the problems leading to the decision to perform the procedure? • What methods were used? • What were the results? • What do the results mean? Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 10
  11. 11. Understand the difference between a progress report and a status report:• A progress report describes an ongoing project.• A status report, or activity report, describes the entire range of operations of a department or division. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 11
  12. 12. Report your progress honestly whenresponding to three common problems:• The deliverable won’t be what you thought it would be.• You won’t meet your schedule.• You won’t meet the budget. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 12
  13. 13. Two organizational patterns are typical in progress and status reports:Time Pattern Task PatternDiscussion Discussion A. Past Work A. Task 1 B. Future Work 1. Past Work 2. Future Work B. Task 2 1. Past Work 2. Future Work Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 13
  14. 14. Project an appropriate tone in a progress or status report:• If the news is good, convey your optimism but avoid overstatement.• Don’t panic if the preliminary results are not as promising as you had planned or if the project is behind schedule. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 14
  15. 15. Use this strategy when writing incident reports:• Explain what happened.• Explain why it happened.• Explain what the organization did or will do to follow up on the incident. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 15
  16. 16. Use this strategy when writing meeting minutes:• Be clear, comprehensive, objective, and diplomatic.• Report the events of the meeting accurately.• Do not record emotional exchanges between participants; the minutes should reflect positively on participants and the organization. Chapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 16
  17. 17. Communicating with the PublicChapter 17. Writing Informational Reports © 2012 byBedford/St. Martins
  18. 18. Tools and policies for communication have changed:• The old philosophy was top down. For example, a company wanting to publicize a new product would issue press releases, write articles for trade magazines, and place ads in magazines and on TV.• The new philosophy is bottom up. Now, a company uses social media to connect with its various stakeholders. Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 18
  19. 19. Here are four one-way applications for presenting information to the public:• newsletters• brochures• white papers• podcasts Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 19
  20. 20. A typical newsletter includes most of these 10 elements:• banner• table of contents• headlines• bylines• jump lines and end signs Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 20
  21. 21. A typical newsletter includes most of these 10 elements (cont.):• continuation headings• photographs• pull quotes• publisher• postal information Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 21
  22. 22. Follow these four suggestions when creating a brochure:• Decide where and how your brochure will be reproduced.• Design your information to fit appropriately on the panels.• Use the front panel to attract attention.• Avoid design clichés. Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 22
  23. 23. Follow these seven suggestions for writing an effective white paper:• Communicate useful information.• Use a subtle approach.• Cite your sources.• Make the white paper easy to skim and navigate.• Help readers who don’t know all the jargon.• Make sure the white paper prints well in black and white.• End with a call to action. Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 23
  24. 24. Practice these six ethical values when marketing your organization:• honesty• responsibility• fairness• respect• openness• citizenship Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 24
  25. 25. Follow these four steps when creating a podcast:• Prepare for your podcast.• Record the podcast.• Edit the podcast.• Publish the podcast. Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 25
  26. 26. Three social-media applications for connecting with the public:• discussion boards• blogs• wikis Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 26
  27. 27. Follow these six guidelines when posting to discussion boards:• Share your knowledge.• Do your homework before posting a question.• Support your claims with evidence.• Stay on topic.• Avoid personal attacks.• Disclose potential conflicts of interest. Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 27
  28. 28. Follow these six guidelines when writing a blog:• Know and follow your company’s blogging policies.• Provide good content without saying too much.• Use an authentic voice.• Avoid conflicts of interest.• Manage your time carefully.• Follow up on negative comments. Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 28
  29. 29. Follow these six suggestions when using a wiki:• Know your audience.• Keep your wiki up-to-date.• Integrate the wiki with other documentation.• Integrate the wiki within your community.• Make organization a high priority.• Help reluctant users get involved. Chapter 22. Connecting with the Public © 2012 by Bedford/St. Martins 29

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