Chou - SXSW 2011- Minority Report

404 views
338 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
404
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • With the rapid changes in communication technologies, health agencies and programs, including the NCI, are struggling to figure out how to take advantage of the new and emerging forms of communication in efforts to promote and maintain health. Distilling hype vs. reality.. Etc.
  • Reaching people where they are. Social influences (The Science article)
  • Even though only AA is significant, this result speaks to the connection between advances in technology and disparities. Why? Given Internet access, Whites are not using SM more than other ethnic groups.
  • Persistent digital divide? Disparities in health-related internet use?
  • 1- Still, at least 40% of survivors not on the Net and not directly/first-handedly benefiting from Internet-based cancer communication tools and programs…. sociodemographic variability in terms of internet use…
  • Besides better design and usability: we also need to think about the gaps that can be filled by social media and communication changes.
  • Chou - SXSW 2011- Minority Report

    1. 1. Social media & health disparities<br />Wen-Ying Sylvia Chou<br />Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch<br />National Cancer Institute<br />SXSW Interactive<br />March 13, 2011<br />
    2. 2. Social media<br /><ul><li>Interactivity
    3. 3. Participation
    4. 4. User-generated content
    5. 5. Content and platform increasingly blurred</li></li></ul><li>Web 2.0 changes in communication: Key measures<br /><ul><li>Internet penetration(~69-75% adults1, 2)
    6. 6. Broadband adoption(~66%2)
    7. 7. Mobile technologies (~82% 2),
    8. 8. Social networking participation (23% of Internet users1)
    9. 9. Health information seeking online (80% of Internet users2)
    10. 10. Health-related Internet use3</li></ul>1Chou, WS et al. 2009. Social Media Use in the US: Implications for health communication, J Med Internet Res, 1(4): e48.<br />2 Pew Internet and American Life Project<br />3Chou, WS et al. In Review. Health-related Internet Use among Cancer Survivors: Data from Health Information National Trends Survey, 2003-2008. <br />
    11. 11. HINTS Estimate, 2003: 63%<br />HINTS Estimate, 2008: 68%<br />HINTS Estimate, 2005: 61%<br /><ul><li>Slide courtesy of Brad Hesse</li></li></ul><li>Social media activities for Internet users<br />Chou, WS et al. 2009. Social Media Use in the US: Implications for health communication, J Med Internet Res, 1(4): e48.<br />
    12. 12. Health-related Internet use<br />Internet as 1st source of health information<br />Emailing Providers<br />Online Rx purchase<br />Support group participation<br />
    13. 13. Using social media for health information<br /><ul><li>National Research Corporation survey: 41% reported using social media as a source of health care information.
    14. 14. Facebook as 1st choice and YouTube a distant second.</li></li></ul><li>Implications on health disparities<br /><ul><li>Hypes vs. reality?
    15. 15. Key question:
    16. 16. How to harness the power of social media to enhance communication for maintaining and improving health, individually and for all?</li></li></ul><li>Disparities in technology access and health <br />
    17. 17. Household Broadband Use by Income (2009)<br />Dept of Commerce 2010 Report<br />(Slide courtesy of Vish Viswanath)<br />
    18. 18. Household Broadband Use by Race/Ethnicity (2009)<br />Dept of Commerce 2010 Report<br />(Slide courtesy of Vish Viswanath)<br />
    19. 19. The Digital Divide<br />Health information seeking by education<br />Rutten LF et al. 2008. Cancer Communication: Health Information National Trends Survey. Washington DC: National Cancer Institute.<br />Slide courtesy of Brad Hesse<br />
    20. 20. The Digital Divide<br />Health information seeking by race / ethnicity<br />Rutten LF, Moser RP, Beckjord EB, Hesse, BW, Croyle RT. Cancer Communication: Health Information National Trends Survey. Washington DC: National Cancer Institute. 2007.<br />Slide courtesy of Brad Hesse<br />
    21. 21. At the same time….<br /><ul><li>Data suggest the digital divide may be narrowing:
    22. 22. Controlling for Internet access, social media is penetrating the US independent of education, race/ethnicity or health care access</li></ul>Image credit: www.neiu.egu<br />
    23. 23. Social-networking site participation across race/ethnicity groups<br />Variables in the model include: age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, self-described general health and psychological distress, and personal cancer experience. <br />Chou, WS et al. 2009. Social Media Use in the US: Implications for health communication, J Med Internet Res, 1(4): e48.<br />
    24. 24. Minorities have equal or greater usage on most major social media platforms<br />PEW Internet and American Life Project 2010 data<br />
    25. 25. Health-related Internet and social media use<br />
    26. 26. Cancer survivors’ Internet use: <br />HINTS 2003-08<br /><ul><li>Internet access is associated with younger age, being non-Hispanic White, higher education, metropolitan residency, and better self-reported health
    27. 27. There was no significant differences in any measure of health-related Internet use by race/ethnicity
    28. 28. Health status and time since cancer diagnosis did not affect health-related Internet use</li></ul>Chou, WS et al. In Review. Health-related Internet Use among Cancer Survivors: Data from Health Information National Trends Survey, 2003-2008<br />
    29. 29. Health communication implications<br /><ul><li>Enabling equitable Internet access
    30. 30. Use of social media ≠ health-related use
    31. 31. Platform and content blurred
    32. 32. Measurement challenges
    33. 33. Need to rethink communication paradigms
    34. 34. Functions of social media and motivations for use
    35. 35. Information exchange and sharing in participative media
    36. 36. Self expression
    37. 37. Entertainment and amusement
    38. 38. Social support</li></li></ul><li>Implementation of social media-based communication efforts <br /><ul><li>Identifying communication needs of a target population that can be better served through social media
    39. 39. Facilitate peer support and connection
    40. 40. Care transitions and continuity
    41. 41. Real-time symptom tracking
    42. 42. Decision support
    43. 43. Patient engagement</li></li></ul><li>Social media activities at the National Cancer Institute<br />Building the evidence base to support practice<br />Funding opportunity (Program Announcement) on the use of social media for health communication<br />http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/hcirb/<br />Thank you!<br />

    ×