0
Content Marketing for PR Pros<br />YouToo Social Media Conference 2011 – April 15<br />Presented by Paul Roetzer, PR 20/20...
Content Marketing: Changing the PR Industry Forever<br />“Content marketing, which requires expert copywriting and strateg...
Content Marketing Tools<br /><ul><li>Articles
Blogs
Case studies
eBooks
Photos
Podcasts
Press releases
Videos
Webinars
White papers</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
Hybrid Professionals – 10 Traits<br /><ul><li>Social-web savvy
Inbound marketer
Publisher
Analyst
Relationship builder
Lifelong student
Thought leader
Risk taker
Tech savvy
Game changer</li></ul>Source: 10 Traits of an Emerging PR Pro <br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
The Numbers<br /><ul><li>More than 16 billion core searches each month
1.9 billion videos streamed each month
Americans watch 3.5 hrs/week of online video
5 billion photos hosted by Flickr
85 million LinkedIn members
152 million blogs on the Internet
145 million Twitter users
600 million Facebook members
More than 30 billion pieces of content shared each month on Facebook</li></ul>Sources: Facebook, comScore, Arbitron, Flick...
“We all have a story to tell.”<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
Stand Out From the Crowd . . .<br />Win Their Hearts and Minds . . .<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
Win with a Persona-Based Content Strategy<br />Define & differentiate your brand.<br />Build your content creation team.<b...
1) Define & differentiate your brand.<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
What is a brand?<br />Brand = experiences + perceptions<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
How to define your brand?<br /><ul><li>Who are we (in 160 characters or less, and without meaningless jargon)?
What are the three greatest strengths/weaknesses of our brand?
What are our greatest opportunities for growth?
What makes us different, remarkable?
What value (i.e. expertise, resources, guidance, tools) can we bring to our audiences?
What makes customers buy from us the first time (acquisition)? What keeps them coming back (retention)?</li></ul>Twitter: ...
2) Build your content creation team.<br />Source: Driven By Content video series<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
Potential content creators<br /><ul><li>Internal: Marketing, communications, sales, executives, customer service, technica...
Outsourced: Freelance writers, publishers, journalists, PR firms</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
Importance of an editor<br /><ul><li>Maintain the editorial calendar
Keep the team on track
Proof all content prior to publishing
Ensure consistency of style, format, tone & messaging
Can be internal or outsourced</li></ul>Source: What Your Blog May Be Missing<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
What makes for great content?<br /><ul><li>Strategic
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Content Marketing Slide Deck from Paul Roetzer

1,185

Published on

April 2011 - YouToo Social Media Content Marketing Presentation by Paul Roetzler of PR 20/10

Published in: Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,185
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Content marketing requires strong technical and creative writing skills, business acumen, marketing savvy and strategic thinking. A perfect fit for the capabilities of top PR pros.
  • Content marketing requires strong technical and creative writing skills, business acumen, marketing savvy and strategic thinking. Again, a perfect fit for the capabilities of top PR pros.
  • http://royal.pingdom.com/2011/01/12/internet-2010-in-numbers/
  • But it’s not told through traditional channels anymore.We can now tell our own story through online vehicles such as:ArticlesBlogsCase studieseBooksPhotosPodcastsPress releasesVideosWebinarsWhite papers
  • There will always be competition for their affection, so we as small businesses have stand out from the crowd in order to win the hearts and minds of our prospects and customers. We have to be remarkable and memorable, take chances, put their needs and goals ahead of ours, bring value to their lives and help them find success and happiness.And that’s where content marketing comes in . . .
  • And the reality is, if you don’t, then someone else will take the time and fill that void in their life.The same is true in business. As marketers, our job is to know our prospects and customers. To match our knowledge and expertise with their needs for products, services and information.To put a face and name to the individuals we want to reach and influence
  • But, as we learned in the dating analogy, it’s not about us, it’s about publishing information that our prospects, customers and other key audiences find valuable.
  • Many people like to define a brand as “a promise.” I like to think of it as the sum of people’s experiences with and perceptions about you (personal) and your organization.Keep in mind that social media has altered how people interact with brands, and in many cases their online experiences can be the first and only impression they have.
  • Public relations agencies, communications pros, freelancers, former journalists and traditional publishers are all in the conversation as possible sources, but many have yet to step up and evolve their capabilities to meet the growing demand for results-driven online content.
  • 1. Strategic - Online content has to connect to your business goals and brand. Hire writers that understand marketing strategy, and how to deliver copy that integrates across web, search, social and public relations strategies. 2. Brand Centric - Your brand is a sum of experiences and perceptions. Words, images and actions define your brand everyday, and with inbound marketing, your website and content may often serve as the first (and possibly only) opportunity to make an impression.  Business copywriting must convey core brand messages, tell your organization’s story and create positive perceptions that motivate action. 3. Buyer Persona Focused - Great copywriting makes personal connections with readers. Copy needs to speak directly to buyer personas, address their pain points and bring value. Therefore, your copywriters — whether internal or outsourced — must have a clear understanding of your organization’s target audiences, and know how to engage them. 4. Optimized for Search Engines - Online content must be crafted for visitors, but optimized for search engines. Ideally, business copywriters will have core SEO knowledge and capabilities. 5. Technically Sound - Technically sound copy is concise and powerful. It uses proper grammar and is written at the appropriate reading level. It is also consistent in person, voice, tone and format. Copywriters need strong technical writing skills, and the ability to apply these skills whatever the task, medium or subject matter.  6. Creative - Never underestimate the value of quality creative writing. While many of the other elements we’ve discussed can be learned, business-savvy creative writers are in high demand and scarce supply, and can be an invaluable asset to your organization. 7. Results Driven - Copywriting needs to be tied to your organization’s objectives, and should play a key role in delivering results (e.g. generating leads, educating key audiences, positioning as an industry leader, etc.). Copywriters should be invested in tracking the content’s success through metrics such as: pageviews, content downloads, leads and social media reach. This enables future content to be strategized based on past performance, and can encourage the incorporation of new ideas and topics, to drive traffic and capture audiences. Read more: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/6120/7-Key-Elements-Of-Great-Business-Content.aspx#ixzz10HzhCgsw
  • Buyer personas are profiles or biographies on the distinct market segments (e.g. customers, prospects, mainstream media, bloggers) you plan to reach and influence. For a successful marketing campaign, it’s important to understand the goals, concerns and preferences of each of your buyer personas and to tailor your content and messaging accordingly. If done correctly, your target audiences will feel like you are speaking directly to them — answering their questions, addressing their concerns and using their language — thus increasing the likelihood that they will want to engage with your business.To help personalize your buyer personas and make them really come alive, it is often beneficial to give your personas names, distinct traits and even photos. Then, when creating strategy, visualize these archetypical people and direct your messaging to them. By defining and building strategy around your buyer personas, you will be able to better target communications and content, while potentially increasing efficiency and profitability.
  • What has made online matching sites so wildly successful is the ability to connect people based on their profiles, the equivalent to the business world’s buyer personas. In dating, the more you know about someone and understand them, the better chance you have of making a real and lasting connection.
  • MAD-R: Can afford the product/service, have the needed authority to buy, desire it, and respond similarly to a marketing mix.
  • Tap into the knowledge of sales reps and other individuals who communicate with customers on a daily basis. They can probably provide you with some insight into your regular customers, just like I was able to do in the fast food example.Find out what your customers’ motivations, concerns and attitudes are. If possible, speak with current customers.But what if you’re a startup, releasing a new product or venturing into a new market? Or, what if you just don’t have access to historical data? Do a little digging. Research third party sources to gather the information. Here are some suggestions to begin your search:Look at existing publications geared toward your target market segments. What type of language do they use? How do they present their information?Do you see a lot of images, graphs, etc.? What are the hot topics they discuss?Find industry blogs. Who writes them? What are they writing about?Locate and browse social networks and forums that people in your target market segment use. Search for related groups on LinkedIn, Facebook and Ning. Do Twitter searches for keywords. Analyze what people are talking about online. What do they seem interested in? What challenges are they facing? What questions do they ask?Do a quick keyword analysis using a keyword tool. What words do people search the most often? What related keywords are being used? What long-tail keywords exist and what do they say about your potential buyers?Read analyst reports, news articles, government reports, etc. pertaining to your target market segments. Study related legislation. What laws and proposed legislation issues affect your market?Identify sample companies that fit into your market segment. Look at their Websites. Read their annual reports. Get a good feel for their size, structure, successes and challenges. See what you can learn from them. What can you do better? How can you differentiate yourself to really speak to your potential customers?Once you have gathered all the ingredients, create your buyer personas by answering questions about your target audiences based on research. For example; here are a few to get started:
  • ROI Ivan here, who doesn’t care about awareness, engagement, search rankings or any other metric but sales. He doesn’t read blogs, as a matter of fact, he doesn’t even know what they are. His referrals come from his country club buddies, and unless it’s in the print version of the Wall Street Journal, it’s not news.But Ivan runs a $25 million financial services company, and his Gen Y son, who’s addicted to texting and social media, is 3 years away from taking over and transforming the business.
  • Social Technographics classifies people according to how they use social technologiesGroups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly except Conversationalists who participate in at least one of the included activities at least weekly. The Social Technographics Ladder Creators make the social content consumed by others. They write blogs or upload video, music, or text. Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly except Conversationalists who participate in at least one of the included activities at least weekly. The Social Technographics Ladder Conversationalists voice their opinions to other consumers and businesses using vehicles like SNS and Twitter. Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly except Conversationalists who participate in at least one of the included activities at least weekly. The Social Technographics Ladder Critics respond to content from others. They post reviews, comment on blogs, participate in forums, and edit wiki articles. Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly except Conversationalists who participate in at least one of the included activities at least weekly. The Social Technographics Ladder Collectors organize content for themselves or others using RSS feeds, tags, and voting sites like Digg.com Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly except Conversationalists who participate in at least one of the included activities at least weekly. The Social Technographics Ladder Joiners connect in social networks like MySpace and Facebook Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly except Conversationalists who participate in at least one of the included activities at least weekly. The Social Technographics Ladder Spectators consumer social content including blogs, user-generated video, podcasts, forums, or reviews Groups include people participating in at least one of the activities monthly except Conversationalists who participate in at least one of the included activities at least weekly.
  • [Image: Screenshot of mock calendar]Share ideas to build out the calendar withVideoCase studiesCurationRepurposing contentHiring writersGuest authorsInstitute/hub with multiple authorsInvolve employees, especially those working directly with customers
  • “in order to grow smarter and faster than the competition, organizations must maintain powerful and informative Websites, participate in social media and continually publish great content through blogs, podcasts, videos, optimized press releases, case studies, white papers, eBooks and articles.”As Matt Cutts highlighted, there are an array of opportunities for small businesses to publish content that has a direct impact on their site performance and bottom line:The Basics-Blog-VideoEmail newslettersThe Next Level – Premium Content (might require outside support)-Releases-eBooks-Case studies-Original reports-Webinars-White papers-Streaming video (shows, events, presentations)Let’s take a look at a few examples. Keep in mind, it’s about connecting with your buyer personas, so plan for the mediums that will reach them and deliver the greatest value.Matt’s video reinforces a number of these points, and offers some additional ideas on how to participate, and what to publish in order to build links, relationships and brand:http://www.pr2020.com/page/9-content-driven-link-building-tipshttp://www.youtube.com/user/GoogleWebmasterHelp
  • * Newsletter, research, original report, press release, media relationsGenerated significant PR opportunities, including ReadersDigest.com. Buyer persona storyRD.comalexa #5,600
  • In March 2011, Westfield Insurance released Work Out the Bugs in your Information Security eBook - a curated eBook from top posts from the InfoSec blog, launched in Oct. 2008. IT Business Edge, a non-insurance specific IT source, took this content, and with permission, created two highlight content pieces targeted to its audience. Top 10,000 Alexa.
  • [Image: Screenshot of mock calendar]Share ideas to build out the calendar withVideoCase studiesCurationRepurposing contentHiring writersGuest authorsInstitute/hub with multiple authorsInvolve employees, especially those working directly with customers
  • Keeps content on messageRelevant to buyer personasConnects to business goalsGives editor opportunity to look at big picture
  • Original research report targeting B2B marketers and publishers. Establishes thought leadership, engage influentials, drives traffic, search rankings, generates inbound links and PR opportunities.
  • Traditional marketing budget formulas (e.g. percentage of revenue/assets, competitor benchmarks, etc.) are mostly irrelevant in today’s content-driven and community-based campaigns.Traditional budgeting pays for placement, breeds complacency, and lacks true connections to meaningful metrics such as Website traffic, inbound links, leads and sales.Inbound marketing pays for production and participation, and gives underdogs and innovators the ability to grow faster and smarter by outthinking, not outspending, the competition.
  • SourcesImpact of content farmsFixed project vs. per wordTechnical vs. creativeYou get what you pay for
  • Content strategy must be agile. If an eBook works, do more.Focus on minimum of one blog post per week.Monitor performance and make adjustments.
  • SourcesImpact of content farmsFixed project vs. per wordTechnical vs. creativeYou get what you pay for
  • Content marketing requires strong technical and creative writing skills, business acumen, marketing savvy and strategic thinking. Again, a perfect fit for the capabilities of top PR pros.
  • Demand Media is producing more than 4,000 pieces of content per dayCuration will continue to gain momentum as more marketers start incorporating curation into their content marketing strategies and major Web outlets enhance their features to address changing user needs.Also, this highlights the importance of targeted, persona-based content.
  • Content strategy must be agile. If an eBook works, do more.Focus on minimum of one blog post per week.Monitor performance and make adjustments.
  • Content strategy must be agile. If an eBook works, do more.Focus on minimum of one blog post per week.Monitor performance and make adjustments.
  • Content strategy must be agile. If an eBook works, do more.Focus on minimum of one blog post per week.Monitor performance and make adjustments.
  • Transcript of "Content Marketing Slide Deck from Paul Roetzer"

    1. 1. Content Marketing for PR Pros<br />YouToo Social Media Conference 2011 – April 15<br />Presented by Paul Roetzer, PR 20/20<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />#YouToo2011<br />
    2. 2. Content Marketing: Changing the PR Industry Forever<br />“Content marketing, which requires expert copywriting and strategic planning, is the single largest growth opportunity for PR agencies (and professionals).”<br />10 Public Relations Trends That Will Change the Industry Forever<br />Dec. 7, 2008 <br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    3. 3. Content Marketing Tools<br /><ul><li>Articles
    4. 4. Blogs
    5. 5. Case studies
    6. 6. eBooks
    7. 7. Photos
    8. 8. Podcasts
    9. 9. Press releases
    10. 10. Videos
    11. 11. Webinars
    12. 12. White papers</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    13. 13. Hybrid Professionals – 10 Traits<br /><ul><li>Social-web savvy
    14. 14. Inbound marketer
    15. 15. Publisher
    16. 16. Analyst
    17. 17. Relationship builder
    18. 18. Lifelong student
    19. 19. Thought leader
    20. 20. Risk taker
    21. 21. Tech savvy
    22. 22. Game changer</li></ul>Source: 10 Traits of an Emerging PR Pro <br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    23. 23.
    24. 24.
    25. 25. The Numbers<br /><ul><li>More than 16 billion core searches each month
    26. 26. 1.9 billion videos streamed each month
    27. 27. Americans watch 3.5 hrs/week of online video
    28. 28. 5 billion photos hosted by Flickr
    29. 29. 85 million LinkedIn members
    30. 30. 152 million blogs on the Internet
    31. 31. 145 million Twitter users
    32. 32. 600 million Facebook members
    33. 33. More than 30 billion pieces of content shared each month on Facebook</li></ul>Sources: Facebook, comScore, Arbitron, Flickr, Royal Pingdom<br />
    34. 34. “We all have a story to tell.”<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    35. 35. Stand Out From the Crowd . . .<br />Win Their Hearts and Minds . . .<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    36. 36. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    37. 37. Win with a Persona-Based Content Strategy<br />Define & differentiate your brand.<br />Build your content creation team.<br />Profile your buyer personas.<br />Connect content to your goals (and theirs).<br />Choose your publishing tools.<br />Develop your editorial calendar.<br />Integrate your search, social & PR strategies.<br />Establish your budgets (time & money).<br />Launch, measure & evolve.<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    38. 38. 1) Define & differentiate your brand.<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    39. 39. What is a brand?<br />Brand = experiences + perceptions<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    40. 40. How to define your brand?<br /><ul><li>Who are we (in 160 characters or less, and without meaningless jargon)?
    41. 41. What are the three greatest strengths/weaknesses of our brand?
    42. 42. What are our greatest opportunities for growth?
    43. 43. What makes us different, remarkable?
    44. 44. What value (i.e. expertise, resources, guidance, tools) can we bring to our audiences?
    45. 45. What makes customers buy from us the first time (acquisition)? What keeps them coming back (retention)?</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    46. 46. 2) Build your content creation team.<br />Source: Driven By Content video series<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    47. 47. Potential content creators<br /><ul><li>Internal: Marketing, communications, sales, executives, customer service, technical, journalism school interns
    48. 48. Outsourced: Freelance writers, publishers, journalists, PR firms</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    49. 49. Importance of an editor<br /><ul><li>Maintain the editorial calendar
    50. 50. Keep the team on track
    51. 51. Proof all content prior to publishing
    52. 52. Ensure consistency of style, format, tone & messaging
    53. 53. Can be internal or outsourced</li></ul>Source: What Your Blog May Be Missing<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    54. 54. What makes for great content?<br /><ul><li>Strategic
    55. 55. Brand centric
    56. 56. Buyer persona focused
    57. 57. Optimized for search engines
    58. 58. Technically sound
    59. 59. Creative
    60. 60. Results driven</li></ul>Source: 7 Key Elements of Great Business Content<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    61. 61. Buyer persona focused content<br /><ul><li>Make personal connections
    62. 62. Address pain points and bring value
    63. 63. Demonstrate a clear understanding of your audiences, and know how to engage them
    64. 64. Promote and deliver in their preferred format</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    65. 65. 3) Profile your buyer personas.<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    66. 66. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    67. 67. Defining your buyer personas<br /><ul><li>What are their goals and aspirations?
    68. 68. What motivates and inspires them?
    69. 69. What are their problems/pains/obstacles?
    70. 70. How do they consume information (online and offline)?
    71. 71. What/who influences their buying decisions?
    72. 72. What's important to them? </li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    73. 73. Other buyer persona criteria<br /><ul><li>Geography
    74. 74. Demographics
    75. 75. Title/responsibilities
    76. 76. Industry
    77. 77. Preferred communications
    78. 78. Technographics (social media activity)
    79. 79. Buying cycle
    80. 80. Alternatives/competition
    81. 81. Success factors
    82. 82. MAD-R (Money, Authority, Desire, Response)</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    83. 83. How do you research personas?<br /><ul><li>Analyze customer database
    84. 84. Talk to sales reps
    85. 85. Read industry publications, blogs & analyst reports
    86. 86. Check magazine editorial calendars
    87. 87. Monitor/participate in social networks
    88. 88. Run a keyword analysis
    89. 89. Review organic traffic reports
    90. 90. Assess competitor websites & content
    91. 91. Ask them</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    92. 92. “ROI Ivan”<br /><ul><li>Type: Old school/laggard
    93. 93. Title: CEO, president
    94. 94. Industry: Finance, insurance, accounting, legal
    95. 95. Pains: Business flat or declining
    96. 96. Causes: Economy, lack of innovation/vision
    97. 97. Sources: WSJ, trade magazines
    98. 98. Influencers: Peers, media
    99. 99. Technographics: Inactive
    100. 100. Success: Bottom line
    101. 101. Content: Case studies, press releases, original reports</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    102. 102. “Engagement Erin”<br /><ul><li>Type: New school/early adopter
    103. 103. Title: Marketing director, community manager, owner
    104. 104. Industry: Technology, retail, arts & entertainment
    105. 105. Pains: Information & inbox overload, multitasking, platform confusion, too tactical
    106. 106. Causes: Lack of training, following the “experts/gurus,” reporting to “Ivans”
    107. 107. Sources: Social, blogs, webinars
    108. 108. Influencers: Peers, bloggers
    109. 109. Technographics: Creator
    110. 110. Success: Leads, inbound links, engagement, speaking opportunities, website traffic
    111. 111. Content: Blog, videos, mobile apps, webinars, eBooks</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    112. 112. 4) Connect content to your goals (and theirs).<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    113. 113. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    114. 114. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    115. 115. Their goals<br /><ul><li>Knowledge
    116. 116. Confidence
    117. 117. Peace of mind
    118. 118. Efficiency
    119. 119. Differentiation
    120. 120. Competitive advantage
    121. 121. Growth/ROI</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    122. 122. 5) Choose your publishing tools.<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    123. 123. Content-driven link building<br /><ul><li>Participate in the community
    124. 124. Publish original research
    125. 125. Distribute email newsletters
    126. 126. Get a blog
    127. 127. Provide how tos, tutorials
    128. 128. Make a few videos</li></ul>Source: Google Webmaster Central Channel<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    129. 129. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    130. 130. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    131. 131. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    132. 132. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    133. 133. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    134. 134. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    135. 135. 6) Develop your editorial calendar.<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    136. 136. The value of abstracts<br /><ul><li>Topic: How to handle negative comments about your brand online.
    137. 137. Categories: Social Media, Brand
    138. 138. Audience/Buyer Persona: Execs (Executive Eddie) and brand managers (Brandy Brand Manager) who are nervous about social networking because of the loss of brand control.
    139. 139. Goal: Education
    140. 140. Abstract: This blog post will provide actionable tips for brand managers on how to react to negative comments online — whether on review sites, personal blogs, social networks or in response to company postings.
    141. 141. Date: TBD</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    142. 142. 7) Integrate your search, social & PR strategies.<br />Source: How to Build Your Inbound Marketing GamePlan<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    143. 143. Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    144. 144. 8) Establish your budgets (time & money).<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    145. 145. Primary budget factor = content creation<br /><ul><li>Internal = time
    146. 146. Outsourced = money</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    147. 147. What does content cost?<br /><ul><li>Traditional = $1/word
    148. 148. Today = ???</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    149. 149. 9) Launch, measure & evolve.<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    150. 150. Measurement & Impact<br /><ul><li>Content downloads
    151. 151. Donations
    152. 152. Inbound links
    153. 153. Keyword rankings
    154. 154. Leads
    155. 155. Reach
    156. 156. Referring sites
    157. 157. Registrations
    158. 158. Speaking opportunities
    159. 159. Website visitors</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    160. 160. The Case of Matt Cutts<br />Sources: Is Matt Cutts the Most Powerful Man in PR?<br />
    161. 161. The Platform<br /><ul><li>106,000+ Twitter Followers
    162. 162. Gadgets, Google & SEO blog with Alexa Rank of 3,219
    163. 163. Google Webmaster YouTube Channel with 24,000+ subscribers and more than 2.3 million channel views
    164. 164. Frequent speaker, and media source</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    165. 165. The New Model PR Pro<br /><ul><li>Strong personal brand
    166. 166. Value creation through multi-media content
    167. 167. Use of social media to reach, influence and engage
    168. 168. Thought leader and industry expert
    169. 169. Trusted resource</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    170. 170. Beware of the Content Flood<br />Some estimates indicate that in just a few years content on the Internet will double every 72 hours.<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    171. 171. Closing Thoughts<br /><ul><li>Understand what makes audiences unique.
    172. 172. Have a plan and build a strong content team.
    173. 173. Be remarkable and memorable.
    174. 174. Take chances.
    175. 175. Put their needs and goals ahead of yours.
    176. 176. Bring value to their lives and help them find success.</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    177. 177. Resources<br /><ul><li>Driven By Content video series
    178. 178. What Your Blog May Be Missing
    179. 179. 7 Key Elements of Great Business Content
    180. 180. Google Webmaster Central YouTube Channel
    181. 181. How to Build Your Inbound Marketing GamePlan
    182. 182. 2010 B2B Content Marketing: Benchmarks, Budgets and Trends
    183. 183. Content Curation: Bringing Order to Information Overload
    184. 184. 10 Public Relations Trends That Will Change The Industry Forever</li></ul>Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    185. 185. Thank You!<br />Paul Roetzer<br />(216) 333-1242<br />paul@pr2020.com<br />Twitter: @paulroetzer<br />www.PR2020.com<br />Twitter: @PaulRoetzer<br />
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×