Creative Commons and Student Journalism 2.0

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An introduction to Creative Commons for students participating in the Student Journalism 2.0 research project.

http://sj.creativecommons.org

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  • Might want to ask--who here has heard of CC before? Have them explain it. Go off of their response. I’m sure some of them have heard of it.
  • Just a general overview. Good to drive home the point that we are international, and your presence will give the organization a face. We’ll get to what we actually do later.
  • I would go over this briefly, say you’ll explain more about flexible terms and standard copyright later.
  • What do they make of this statement?
  • Drive home this point, that they use stuff for free off the Internet all the time without a second thought. Have they ever remixed anything? Do they watch YouTube/do they upload to it? Do they own a digital camera? Do they use Flickr? When they lift things off the Internet for reports, do they cite? Etc.
  • Show of hands, or just go through list.
  • Specify, “in general.”
  • How many of them have seen this? Been told this? How many teachers have lectured them about plagiarism? Talk a little about the RIAA maybe, lawsuits, etc. Have they heard of the Pirate Bay dude in Sweden or wherever?
  • Talk about how even you can use copyrighted works without permission, as long as its for certain purposes, etc. But the exceptions aren’t always clear in the law and it can be confusing. You’ll learn more about it later!
  • Specify, “in general.”
  • What WE do, as an org, is to provide you.... etc. Drive home the point that CC is copyright for the Internet. Talk about how Nine Inch Nails pre-cleared their album; they wanted to share it! Before CC, there was no way they could do that legally. With CC, they easily let their fans know what they can or can’t do with their music!
  • Talk about how copyright covers these rights. So CC lets creators give some or all of these rights away. The usual spiel.
  • Here, emphasize how the students, too, are creators, and can manage their own copyright with CC!
  • Talk about how even you can use copyrighted works without permission, as long as its for certain purposes, etc. But the exceptions aren’t always clear in the law and it can be confusing. You’ll learn more about it later!
  • A fun tangent, if they can hear via speakers. I couldn’t find the original interview, but most students know who Stephen Colbert is and just showing this is entertaining.
  • Basic overview of the conditions.
  • Just talk about it briefly, say there are four that turn into six licenses, giving various freedoms but that all of them require you to credit the original author. Say you’ll get into it next time--- the machine-readable, legal, etc. aspects of CC! CC is copyright for the Internet! = basic messaging point.
  • Voila! People can lift your stories and spread the news to China! (They have to attribute you of course.) Endless possiblities!
  • What do they think journalism has to do with it? Why would CC be relevant to what they do? Don’t have to get their input here---transition slide.
  • Have they heard about how print journalism is dying? Why do they think so? What do they think about it.
  • A lot of people now get their news via blogs and tweets. This is known as citizen journalism. Talk about how there are new media tools and platforms that journalism should be taking advantage.
  • An example - citizen contributed journalism. Talk a little about this project if you have time.
  • An example - citizen contributed journalism. Talk a little about this project if you have time.
  • I would go over this briefly, say you’ll explain more about flexible terms and standard copyright later.
  • A fun tangent, if they can hear via speakers. I couldn’t find the original interview, but most students know who Stephen Colbert is and just showing this is entertaining.
  • A fun tangent, if they can hear via speakers. I couldn’t find the original interview, but most students know who Stephen Colbert is and just showing this is entertaining.
  • A fun tangent, if they can hear via speakers. I couldn’t find the original interview, but most students know who Stephen Colbert is and just showing this is entertaining.
  • Of course this slide deck is CC licensed.
  • Creative Commons and Student Journalism 2.0

    1. 1. What is Creative Commons?
    2. 2. First things first http://creativecommons.org We’re a nonprofit based in San Francisco with around 30 employees around the world.
    3. 3. What we’re all about http://creativecommons.org We offer free legal and technical tools that allow creators to easily share their work.
    4. 4. Digital technologies have revolutionized how creative works are made, distributed, and used. Original text by Creative Commons Australia No. 00213J CRICOS
    5. 5. Everyday we use Movies Pictures Music Text Are you ready??? by ssh available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ssh/12638218/ under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 licence
    6. 6. C • It covers everything you want to use – blogs, photos, music, videos, computer games • It covers everything you want to do – copying, emailing, posting it to a blog • Even if it’s on the internet (or TV or radio) Creative Commons Australia
    7. 7. • Emailing that news story to a friend? • Posting a picture/song/film onto your blog? • Using a song in a podcast or film? • Uploading your favorite scenes of a TV show on YouTube? • Copying a song from a friend’s iPod? by 1Happysnappers( is catching up slowly ) http://www.flickr.com/photos/21560098@N06/3636921327/) Original text by Creative Commons Australia CC BY
    8. 8. These activities are usually illegal unless you get permission.
    9. 9. Most people who tell you about copyright focus on restrictions by Creative Commons Australia
    10. 10. Of course, there are exceptions. Fair use
    11. 11. Creative Commons licenses make copyright about freedom.
    12. 12. Creative Commons provides tools for creators to grant permission ahead of time Original slide by Creative Commons Australia
    13. 13. These permissions include the right to copy/distribute, perform, display, build upon, and remix.
    14. 14. These tools are also for managing your own copyright Tooled Flatty by flattop341 available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/flattop341/1085739925/ under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence Original slide by Creative Commons Australia
    15. 15. Flickr user ryanr, http://flickr.com/photos/ryanr/142455033 So that you can collaborate and share material with anyone.
    16. 16. So how does it work?
    17. 17. Four License Conditions Six Licenses
    18. 18. What does journalism have to do with it?
    19. 19. www.newspaperdeathwatch.com
    20. 20. First 18 days of the Iranian Election: 2,024,166 Tweets #iranelection
    21. 21. http://creativecommons.org Engaging journalism students in the evolving technical, legal, and social landscape of online journalism.
    22. 22. How does engaging with these ideas change what you do?
    23. 23. We want to hear from you.
    24. 24. Goals 1. To engage you with copyright, CC, online publishing, and how all that relates to journalism. 2. To better understand what you think about these topics. 3. To develop materials and strategies for a national project.
    25. 25. Attribute to with a link to learn.creativecommons.org Creative Commons, ccLearn, the double C in a circle and the open Book in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders.

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