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Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry
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Powerpoint presentationLyric Poetry

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  • 1. Lezlie Joy Caryl JoieKathleen Mae Reianne Mariela Pauline Arnie Arvin Ralph Ryan Bill Bix Bless
  • 2.  Lyric poetry is a genre of poetry that expresses personal and emotional feelings. It is usually short and song-like. In the ancient world, lyric poems were those which were sung to the lyre. Lyric poems do not have to rhyme, and today do not need to be set to music or a beat. The lyric poem, dating from the Romantic era, does have some thematic antecedents in ancient Greek and Roman verse, but the ancient definition was based on metrical criteria, and in archaic and classical Greek culture presupposed live performance accompanied by a stringed instrument.
  • 3. A narrative poem is usually much longer and relates a story. A lyric poem is shorter and were originally played to a lyre.
  • 4.  Haiku (also called Nature or Seasonal haiku) is an unrhymed Japanese verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables (5,7,5) or 17 syllables in all. Usually written in the present tense and focuses on nature(seasons).HaikuFormat: I am first with five Then seven in the middle— Five again to end.
  • 5. Furuike yakawazu tobikomumizu no oto -Basho (1644-1694)An old silent pond…A frog jumps into the pond,splash! Silence again. -Translated by Harry Behn
  • 6.  A Villanelle a nineteen-line poem with two rhymes throughout, consisting of five tercets and a quatrain, with the first and third lines of the opening tercet recurring alternately at the end of the other tercets and with both repeated at the close of the concluding quatrain.
  • 7. “The Home on the Hill” Edward Arlington Robinson (1869-1935) Why is it then we strayThey are all gone away, Around the sunken sill?The house is shut and still, They are all gone awayThere is nothing more to say And our poor fancy playThrough broken walls and gray, For them is wasted skill,The wind blows bleak and shrill, There is nothing more to sayThey are all gone away There is ruin and decayNor is there one today, In the House on the Hill:To speak them good or ill They are all gone away,There is nothing more to say There is nothing more to say.
  • 8.  Short and usually unrhymed poem consisting of twenty-two(22) syllables distributed as 2,4,6,8,2 in five lines. This was developed by the imagist, Adelaide Crapsey.
  • 9. ―Snow‖Look up…From bleakening hillsBlows down the light, first breathOf wintry wind…look up, and scentThe snow!
  • 10.  This is a poem of fourteen(14) lines. There are two(2) kinds of sonnets according to design. The first is the Petrarchan or Italian sonnet which consists of an octave (8 lines) and sestet (6 lines). The Shakespearean or English sonnet consists of three quatrians(four lines each) and a clinching couplet (two lines). William Shakespear wrote about 156 sonnets in his lifetime.
  • 11. “On His Blindness” John Milton (1608-1674)When I consider how my light is spent,Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide,And that one Talent which is death to hide,Lodgd with me useless, though my Soul more bentTo serve therewith my Maker, and presentMy true account, least he returning chide,Doth God exact day-labour, light denyd,I fondly ask; But patience to preventThat murmur, soon replies, God doth not needEither mans work or his own gifts, who bestBar his milde yoak, they serve him best, his StateIs Kingly. Thousands at his bidding speedAnd post ore Land and Ocean without rest:They also serve who only stand and waite.
  • 12. ―Sonnet 1 – From Fairest Creatures We Desire Increase‖FROM fairest creatures we desire increase,That thereby beautys rose might never die,But as the riper should by time decease,His tender heir might bear his memory:But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes,Feedst thy lightst flame with self-substantial fuel,
  • 13. A Limerick is a rhymed humorous or nonsense poem of five(5) lines which originated in Limerick, Ireland. Limerick has a set rhyme of: a-a-b-b-a with a syllable structure of: 9-9-6-6-9. One of the most popular poetic forms among children. The fun of the Limerick lies in its rollicking rhythm and its broad humour.
  • 14. There was a young lady of station"I love man" was her sole exclamationBut when men cried, "You flatter"She replied, "Oh! no matterIsle of Man is the true explanation― -Lewis CarrollA man hired by John Smith and Co.Loudly declared that he’d tho.Men that he sawDumping dirt near his doorThe drivers, therefore, didn’t do. -Mark Twain
  • 15.  Free Verse is an irregular form of poetry in which the content free of traditional rules of versification. Adhering to no predetermined rules, but usually with its own intricate patterns of rhyme and rhythm. It requires the same thoughtful choice of words and rhythmical patterns as the more rigid stanza forms.
  • 16. From After the Sea-ShipWalt Whitman (1819-1892)After the Sea-Ship—after the whistling winds;After the white-gray sails, taut to their spars and ropes,Below, a myriad, myriad waves, hastening, lifting up their necks,Tending in ceaseless flow toward the track of the ship:Waves of the ocean, bubbling and gurgling, blithely prying,Waves, undulating waves—liquid, uneven, emulous waves,Toward that whirling current, laughing and buoyant, with curves,Where the great Vessel, sailing and tacking, displaced the surface;Larger and smaller waves, in the spread of the ocean, yearnfully flowing;The wake of the Sea-Ship, after she passes—flashing and frolicsome, under the sun,A motley procession, with many a fleck of foam, and many fragments,Following the stately and rapid Ship—in the wake following.

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