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  • 1. TAYAO, Ada Marie S. EDUC190 Personal Reflection 3 2008 – 16167 Sir Noel Feria October 6, 2010 A Personal Upgrade From what I have observed, usually, parents have this notion that computer games and academic learning cannot go hand-in-hand. However, as presented by some of my classmates, this is not the case. True, even before, educational computer games have been developed – usually in tutorial forms. What I think is different now is that efforts are being made to not make the games so explicitly EDUCATIONAL. What I mean by this is that educational games are being developed in such a way that the player/student does not have to feel like he or she is being explicitly instructed on this certain lesson or skill. It’s just a fun game that people can learn a lot from without receiving instruction that is too direct to the point. What’s even better is that even Filipinos are starting to develop educational games. This time, students can be exposed to games made by their fellow Filipinos who know the contexts to be applied for Filipino students. In connection to educational games, although I was not able watch all of the video presentations, when I was looking for a suitable topic for our group for Software Freedom Day 2010, I came across a lot of free open source software which students and teachers could use for learning and teaching. It’s nice to see that the world is opening up its knowledge to people who can make these software better, and to people who can use the software for meaningful purposes. During the Y4iT Congress last September, we were able to encounter people who were developing technology that would be or is already very useful to many people. I was not really able to listen to a full lecture because I did other errands as a volunteer, but still, it was an enjoyable experience. It was there that I saw just how much effort is put into bringing together people for a major event full of useful lessons and insights for the speakers and the participants, especially to the youth.
  • 2. After the Y4iT Congress, we resumed regular classes. I really liked the lecture on computer security because I think it was practical and useful not necessarily for us as teachers, but for us as computer and internet users. It was also nice that we did an activity which involved role-playing – not usually an activity that would come to one’s mind when the course is mainly about technology. Just like during the initial part of the semester, we once again viewed some TED Talks as well. I was pleasantly overwhelmed by the technology shown to us. Before we watched the video on the power of the mind, I thought that being able to make objects move through your thoughts was still only possible in the world of special effects. It may not exactly be how we imagined it in the movies, but the fact that there is actual technology with that similar capacity shows that our technology today really has soared to such great heights. I think that I as well have soared to greater heights because of this course. I’ve been able to try out various operating systems (Windows, Ubuntu, Mac), and I relatively sailed through them. Being exposed to different operating systems has given me, I think, a wider perspective on computers and how people use them. Also, while working on my digital portfolio, I was able to look back on the many activities that our class did. It was interesting to see just how much we grew from using word processors to setting-up databases. I think our assignments and skills development activities really have helped me develop skills that I know will be useful to me whether as a student or as a teacher. It’s up to me to further develop these skills that have been introduced to me. It’s up to me to upgrade myself.